Posts Tagged ‘ sleep ’

Rosie to the Rescue: Get Your Baby to Sleep

Thursday, November 8th, 2012

Check out blog posts by Rosie Pope, star of Bravo’s “Pregnant in Heels,” every week at Parents.com! 

Sleeping through the night: four magical words any parent wants to be able to say about her child. However, they’re four words that seem so hard to achieve.

I think I get asked more sleep-related questions than other type. Sleep is something that makes us parents extremely anxious, not only because we want our wee ones to get enough sleep to help their development, but also so that we get enough Z’s and can be at our most functional, too. (BTW, I write this as I take another gulp of coffee, as we have not yet sleep-trained Vivienne!) Let’s face it, after months of a few hours of sleep a night, none of us are the best parents that we can be.

Still, a lot of parents, including me, have a very hard time doing what’s necessary to get our children to sleep through the night as early as we’d like, and that means doing some form of sleep training. Of course, you don’t have to sleep train, and maybe you have a sleep prodigy (lucky you!). But in my experience, a child won’t start sleeping through the night on his own accord truly, and that means approximately 7pm to 7am, until he’s well into his second year of life, and maybe much later than that. Teaching good sleep habits and the ability to self-sooth so that your baby can put himself to sleep, and fall back asleep if he wakes up in the middle of the night, is extremely important. And while I do find sleep training difficult, I make sure to do it and I am much happier (and so are my kids) for it. You’ve probably heard of the following options, and it’s up to you to decide what’s right for you:

  • Gradual Parent Removal Method/Chair Method: The parent puts the child in the crib awake, and sits in a chair close to the crib until he falls asleep. Over seven nights, the chair is moved further back until it’s no longer in the room and the child can self-sooth. You cannot engage with him while in the room.
  • Dr. Ferber’s Graduated Extinction Approach/The Progressive Approach: This basically involves putting the child in the crib awake and checking on him in regular intervals until he falls asleep, increasing the intervals each night for seven nights.
  • Dr. Weissbluth’s Extinction Method: The child is put in the crib awake and the parents don’t return until morning. This method takes around two to three nights.

I find the earliest possible time you can sleep train is at 4 months, if your baby weighs at least 14 pounds, and of course you have to first make sure that he’s eating enough during the day (24-32 oz milk) so that he doesn’t need milk during the night, which often means that sleep training occurs a little later.

I know people have mixed feeling about CIO but used in this setting for sleep, there really is no strong evidence that it harms our babies, and knowing that the “extinction” method only takes two to three nights, you could all be having sweet dreams sooner than you imagined. That being said, when we sleep train in our household, my husband has to sit on me, as it is not an easy thing to do.

Bottom line: Decide what is best for your family, and be consistent. Sweet dreams.

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Monday, October 15th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Adding Up Autism Risks
New research published in the journal Molecular Autism shows that common genetic polymorphisms (genetic variation) can add up to an increased risk of autism spectrum disorders. (via Science Daily)

HPV Vaccine Doesn’t Spur Teen Sex, Study Finds
The HPV vaccine does not send teenage girls out seeking sex, contrary to the protests of some parents who worried about immunizing young girls against a sexually transmitted virus, researchers reported Monday. (via NBC News)

Peanut Butter Recall Extended to Raw, Roasted Peanuts
More than 400 products have been added to the growing list of recalled items. (via ABC News)

El Paso Schools Confront Scandal of Students Who ‘Disappeared’ At Test Time
Administrators are accused of keeping low-performing students out of classrooms at test time to bolster schools’ scores. (via New York Times)

More Sleep Means More Focused, Emotionally Stable Kids
Getting too little could leave them more emotional and impulsive. (via Time)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, October 2nd, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

‘Active’ Video Games Get Some Kids Off the Couch
Kids may spend too much time in front of the TV, but “active” video games are getting some of them on their feet and moving, according to a study out Monday. (via Reuters)

Baby Communication Gives Clues to Autism
A new study shows that measures of non-verbal communication in children, as young as eight months of age, predict autism symptoms that become evident by the third year of life. (via Science Daily)

Smoked Salmon Blamed for Salmonella Outbreak
Smoked salmon tainted with salmonella bacteria has sickened hundreds of people in the Netherlands and the United States, sparking a major recall, health authorities said Tuesday. (via AP)

HPV Vaccine Safe But Linked to Fainting and Skin Infections, Study Finds
The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine is generally safe, but may increase the risk of fainting and skin infections shortly after vaccination, a new study finds. (via My Health Daily News)

Pedestrian Accidents Are More Preventable for Young People
Trauma surgeons have identified two preventable reasons why young pedestrians are struck by motor vehicles — poor guardian supervision and distraction because of mobile device use. (via Science Daily)

Poor Sleep and Sleep Habits in Adolescence May Raise Health Risks
Evidence now suggests that sleep problems during adolescence may negatively impact heart health. (via CNN)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Monday, September 10th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Private School Parents More Likely to Opt Out of Vaccines
A California school survey shows that parents who send their children to private schools opt out of immunizations more than their public school counterparts. (via AP)

Older Overweight Children Consume Less Calories than Healthy Weight Peers
A new study shows that children who become overweight in early childhood have difficulty losing weight even when they consume less calories than their healthy weight peers. (via Science Daily)

Infant Sleep Training Has No Long Term Effects
Using behavioral training to help babies fall asleep doesn’t seem to harm them emotionally or developmentally years later, but it doesn’t benefit them long-term either, according to a new study. (Reuters)

Breastfeeding in Infancy May Shield Adults from Depression
A German study suggests people who were breastfed as infants may have a lower risk of depression as adults. (via My Health News Daily)

‘Toys R Us’ Launches Children’s Tablet
Toys R Us Inc. is launching, ‘Tabeo,’ a new children’s tablet that will contain family friendly apps and parental controls for internet use. (via Wall Street Journal)

Toddler Death Prompts Window Blind Recall
450,000 window blinds sold in Michigan, Ohio and Indiana have been recalled after a Detroit toddler was strangled by the blind cords. The blinds did not have cord stop devices. (via CBS News)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Monday, August 6th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Violent Cartoons Linked to Sleep Problems in Preschoolers
Swapping Batman for Big Bird could help young kids sleep better, a new study found. The study of sleep habits among 565 preschool-age children found that those who tuned in to age-appropriate educational programs were less likely to have sleep problems than those who watched sparring superheroes or slapstick scenes meant for slightly older kids. (via ABC News)

A White Dad Does His Black Daughter’s Hair, and the Internet Smiles
The little family moments are often the ones we wind up treasuring over the years. Usually, they’re lost in the shuffle of daily life, but sometimes they’re captured on camera. And sometimes, those pictures capture the hearts of people everywhere. Such is the case of a picture posted on Facebook by Frank Somerville, a TV news anchor in Oakland, CA. (via MSNBC)

Parents Get Physical With Unruly Kids, Study Finds
Parents get physical with their misbehaving children in public much more than they show in laboratory experiments and acknowledge in surveys, according to one of the first real-world studies of caregiver discipline. (via Science Daily)

Gold Medal Mom: ‘I Felt Selfish’ Training for Olympics
For every woman who feels like she’s had to scale back her personal ambitions since becoming a mother, gold medal cyclist Kristin Armstrong has a message: Don’t give up on your dreams. (via Today.com)

Motherhood May Make You Smarter, New Study Says
In the study, women who were new mothers scored better on tests of visuospatial memory — the ability to perceive and remember information about their surroundings — compared with women who didn’t have children. (via MSNBC)

Growing Up Grateful Gives Teens Multiple Mental Health Benefits
Grateful teens are more likely than their less grateful peers to be happy, less likely to abuse drugs and alcohol and less likely to have behavior problems at school, according to research presented at the American Psychological Association’s 120th Annual Convention. (via Science Daily)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, August 2nd, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Fudge Factor: Americans in Denial About Weight Gain
Researchers from the University of Washington found people — especially men — often think they are losing weight when they really aren’t, a new study shows. (via NBC News)

Study: Shaky Mental Health Linked to Higher Death Risk
Among disease-free, healthy adults included within a new U.K. study, the more signs of psychological distress people had, the higher the death rates they experienced — even at low levels of distress and even after accounting for a large number of health conditions and health behaviors that might explain the link. (via TIME)

23andMe Seeks FDA Approval for Personal DNA Test
Genetic test maker 23andMe is asking the Food and Drug Administration to approve its personalized DNA test. The company’s saliva-based kits have attracted scrutiny for claiming to help users detect whether they are likely to develop illnesses like breast cancer, heart disease, and Alzheimer’s. (via Associated Press)

Why Lack of Sleep Weakens Vaccine Effectiveness
A new study shows people getting less than six hours of sleep per night on average were far less likely than longer sleepers to show adequate antibody responses to the vaccine and so they were far more likely — 11.5 times more likely — to be unprotected by the immunization. (via TIME)

Mindfulness Training May Improve Health and Well-Being of Pregnant Women and Newborns
First-time mothers who pay attention to their emotional and physical changes during their pregnancy may feel better and have healthier newborns than new mothers who don’t, research suggests. (via Science Daily)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Monday, July 2nd, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

As Crops Rot, Millions Go Hungry in India
Every day some 3,000 Indian children die from illnesses related to malnutrition, and yet countless heaps of rodent-infested wheat and rice are rotting in fields across the north of their own country. (via Reuters)

Slightly Early Birth May Hurt Baby’s Academic Performance
Kids who get too early a start at life – even if they are born in the first half of the gestation period associated with “normal term” birth – appear more likely to struggle at reading and math by the time they reach third grade, new research suggest. (via ABC News)

Hitting Your Kids Increases their Risk of Mental Illness
A new study in Pediatrics finds that harsh physical punishment increases the risk of mental disorders — even when the punishment doesn’t stoop to the level of actual abuse. People who experienced physical punishment were more likely to experience nearly every type of mental illness examined. (via TIME)

California Bill Would Let Children Have More than Two Parents
When adults fight over parenthood, a judge must decide which two have that right and responsibility – but that could end soon. California State Sen. Mark Leno is pushing legislation to allow a child to have multiple parents. (via The Sacramento Bee)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, February 21st, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Sex-Changing Treatments Are on the Rise in Kids
A small but growing number of teens and even younger children who think they were born the wrong sex are getting support from parents and from doctors who give them sex-changing treatments, according to reports in the medical journal Pediatrics.

Ultrasound Abortion Bill Nears Vote in Virginia
A bill requiring a woman to get an ultrasound before having an abortion is poised to pass Virginia’s legislature this week, placing it on track to be signed into law by Gov. Bob McDonnell.

New Guidelines Planned on School Vending Machines
The Obama administration, in a continuation of its efforts to curb childhood obesity, plans to set nationwide guidelines to promote healthy choices in schools.

Kids Who Don’t Gender Conform Are at Higher Risk of Abuse
Swapping gender roles is common in childhood play, but a new study finds that non-conforming kids are at risk for physical and sexual abuse and post-traumatic stress.

Even Babies Can Recognize What’s Fair
Babies as young as 19 months are affronted when they see displays of injustice.

How Much Sleep Do Teens Really Need? Maybe Less than You Think
If your teen’s lack of sleep is keeping you up nights, a new study should help put your mind at ease.

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