Posts Tagged ‘ sleep ’

American Baby’s Baby Booty: Win the New Halo Bassinest Plus a Gift Set!

Thursday, October 2nd, 2014

The mission of safe sleep for babies is something that HALO takes very seriously. While they’ve always been a leader in safe baby nightwear, such as their SleepSack Swaddle and SleepSack wearable blanket, they’re now introducing their first piece of gear, the innovative HALO Bassinest Swivel Sleeper.

Use the bassinet to have your baby sleep by your side, but not in your bed (which poses a suffocation hazard; if you don’t believe them, read about safe sleep habits from First Candle). Unlike traditional bassinets, this one can slide right next to you in bed, plus one side lowers down, making it easy to lift your baby out for feedings. Also, the mesh sides provide both good air flow and a clear view of your sleeping infant, for peace of mind. It’s good from the moment you bring your newborn home until he or she is about 5 months old.

The Bassinest just launched for $230 at Giggle and Right Start. But HALO is also generously giving one away here! HALO will send ONE (1) lucky winner a HALO Bassinest Swivel Sleeper and a HALO gift set (including a SleepSack, Swaddle and a SleepSack wearable blanket); a retail value of approximately $294.00.

To enter, leave a comment below, up to one a day between today and the end of the day October 8th. More Qs about our giveaway? Read our official rules. Be sure to check back on October 9th and scroll to the bottom of the post to see who won. We reach out to winners via Facebook message (it goes into your “other” message folder on Facebook), so if you win, look for us there as well. Goody luck!

Congrats to our winner, Casey Hoffman! Please check your “other” message folder on Facebook in order to claim your prize.

Watch the video below for additional tips on dressing your baby for sleep.

 

Dress Baby for Sleep
Dress Baby for Sleep
Dress Baby for Sleep

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American Baby’s Baby Booty: Win a Trio of Transition Swaddles from Zipadee-Zip

Thursday, February 6th, 2014

Turns out my niece is not such a sleeper. She snoozes for 45 minutes or so, then pops back awake. My brother and sister-in-law swaddled her from birth, and that really did help for some months. Then having her arms bound started to make her furious. (Plus, once a baby can roll, a tight swaddle is a safety issue…babies have to have their arms free enough to push on the mattress and lift their little head up to breath.)

Even though I’m a baby-gear expert, I didn’t know what to recommend beyond trying a baby sleeping bag/wearable blanket. But my relatives are intrepid, and found this little Zipadee-Zip. The parents who invented it had the same issue as my bro and sis-in-law, their daughter wanted to be free and coddled at the same time. They invented this star-shaped wearable blanket so that an older baby’s feet and arms can be totally enclosed, yet have some necessary freedom of movement. 

If you’re having sleep issues, this might help! This week’s giveaway will offer ONE lucky winner the chance to choose three favorite styles of Zipadee-Zips. It’s a package worth $104 to $119, depending on which styles you chose. (Each Zipadee-Zip costs between $35 and $39 plus postage.)

To enter, leave a comment below, up to one a day between today and the end of the day February 12. More Qs about our giveaway? Read the official rules. Be sure to check back on February 13 and scroll to the bottom of the post to see who won. We reach out to winners via Facebook message (it goes into your “other” message folder on Facebook), so if you win, look for us there as well. Goody luck!

Are you a swaddling newbie? Watch our video!

How to Swaddle Baby
How to Swaddle Baby
How to Swaddle Baby

Congrats to our winner Alisha Erickson!

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The Joy of a Sleeping Baby

Tuesday, September 24th, 2013

You probably know that infants should snooze about 14 to 15 hours total (nighttime rest plus naps) every 24 hours. So why does it feel like your sweetie is always awake? Or the minute her sleepy head hits the crib, she pops her eyes wide open? Because making sure your infant gets good zzz’s takes a lot of hard work, time and practice!

We’d love for you to share your thoughts and opinions with us about all things sleep-related for babies from birth to age one.

Please take a moment to complete our short survey. You can also enter to win a Babies “R” Us gift card. And who couldn’t use a little cash for baby gear?! But hurry! This survey and sweepstakes ends October 4.

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Tags: , | Categories: Babies, GoodyBlog, Health & Safety

American Baby’s Baby Booty: Win a Cloud b Sleep-Well Package

Thursday, June 20th, 2013

You know who sleeps well? A newborn, as demonstrated by my niece, below. When you’re one day old, what else are you going to do?

But as a mom of two, I know that this new baby is going to wake up and want to party like all of them do. And for that, my Bro and his wife are going to need strategies. Here are some from Cloud b (a company that focuses on products for baby’s sleep) that I agree with completely:

* You need a routine. If you do the same things night after night in the same order, eventually it signals sleep to a kid. Your routine can be bath/nursing/song/swaddle/lights out, or any variation, it’s just the consistency that matters.

* Swaddling helps most newborns. Not all, but most! It makes them feel like they’re still in the womb, and keeps them from waking themselves if they involuntarily startle.

* Noise helps nearly every infant. They are not used to the sound of silence because the womb is noisy 24/7 thanks to mom’s whooshing blood. A white-noise device helps babies feel at home. 

I’d also add that babies need to be put down awake so they settle themselves to sleep. I failed miserably at this; I nursed each of my babies to sleep and then carefully laid them down conked out, and let’s just say it didn’t do anyone any favors. I finally read Have a Great Sleeper, from Parents magazine advisor Dr. Harvey Karp, and now I get that I should have rocked them gently awake after laying them down, so they could resettle themselves in those first few minutes. It’s such good advice. Have any of you tried this and had it work?

And if any of you are struggling with sleep issues, Cloud b may be able to rescue you with a Sleep-Well package valued at more than $100. One lucky person who comments below will win the Cloud b Tranquil Turtle (which shines soothing dots of lights on the ceiling and plays sea sounds), Sleep Sheep, shown above (a great white-noise device), a Lullabag for safe sleep since you never want a blanket in the crib, and Twinkles to Go Octo, so you even have a soother for vacation. Leave a comment below, up to one a day between now and the end of the day on Wednesday, June 26th. We’ll pick one lucky commenter at random to win. Here are the official rules. Goody luck!

 

Congratulations to out winner Roxanne Winkleman!

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Friday, March 1st, 2013

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Transgender Mississippi Student ‘Leah’ Supported by High School While Students Protest 
Students at a Batesville, Miss. high school are protesting because they believe that a transgender classmate is receiving “special treatment.” As WLOX 13 reports, over 30 students at South Panola High School have vocalized their opposition to a transgender girl identified only as Leah, who has been allowed to wear female clothing. (via Huffington Post)

Zero Degrees? Time for Baby’s Outdoor Nap
American parents may think they’ve got the naptime drill down, ensuring that their infant is on her back with no loose covers or pillows, possibly in a sleep sack if it’s chilly. But Nordic parents add one element to the mix: fresh air, even in winter. (via Fox News)

BPA Exposure Linked to Asthma in Kids
The list of adverse health effects from BPA exposure continues to grow. Bisphenol A, or BPA, is commonly used to line food and beverage cans, and helps to keep plastics flexible, but studies suggest the compound can leach into the foods we eat. (via TIME)

No Clear Benefits for Kids’ Blood Pressure Checks
There’s no evidence that checking kids’ and teens’ blood pressure – and treating them if it’s high – can reduce their heart risks in adulthood, according to a new analysis. (via Reuters)

Eating Junk Food While Pregnant May Make Your Child a Junk Food Addict
Here’s another reason why a healthy diet during pregnancy is critical to the future health of your children: New research published in the March 2013 issue of The FASEB Journal, suggests that pregnant mothers who consume junk food actually cause changes in the development of the opioid signaling pathway in the brains of their unborn children. (via Science Daily)

Action Video Games Boost Reading Skills of Children with Dyslexia Study Suggests
Much to the chagrin of parents who think their kids should spend less time playing video games and more time studying, time spent playing action video games can actually make dyslexic children read better. (via Science Daily)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Wednesday, February 27th, 2013

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Philadelphia School Lunches Get Fancy With ‘Eatiquette’ Program (Photos)
It sounds more like a restaurant order than a school lunch menu: baked ziti with a side of roasted fennel salad and, for dessert, cinnamon apple rice pudding. But that’s one of the meals offered in the cafeteria at People For People Charter School in Philadelphia. And it’s served family-style. Students pass serving dishes around circular tables, where they eat off plates, not cafeteria trays, and use silverware instead of plastic utensils. (via Huffington Post)

NYC Schools After Sandy: Destruction, And Restoration Showcased in New DOE Images
Hurricane Sandy ravaged public schools in low-lying areas across the city — and new photos released by the Department of Education Tuesday show just how bad that damage was. (via Huffington Post)

The Legacy of Lead: How the Metal Affects Academic Achievement
Lead exposure may be on the decline, but it’s still taking its toll on children’s performance in school. Legal requirements to remove lead from gasoline, paint and other common products have led to decreases in lead exposure. But remnants of the metal remain, according to the latest study, and this legacy may be enough to affect children’s cognitive functions. (via TIME)

Sleep Reinforces Learning: Children’s Brains Transform Subconsciously Learned Material Into Active Knowledge
During sleep, our brains store what we have learned during the day ‒ a process even more effective in children than in adults, new research shows. (via Science Daily)

Increased Risk of Sleep Disorder Narcolepsy in Children Who Received Swine Flu Vaccine
A study finds an increased risk of narcolepsy in children and adolescents who received the A/H1N1 2009 influenza vaccine (Pandemrix) during the pandemic in England. (via Science Daily)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Wednesday, January 16th, 2013

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

No Exercise, More Than Couch, Tied To Fat In Kids
For kids, time spent inactive seems less of a factor in higher body fat than does a lack of exercise, according to a new study. Researchers found that the more minutes kids spent exercising at the pace of a fast walk each day, the lower their body fat percentage was. But the time they spent as couch potatoes made no difference, according to results published in the Journal of Pediatrics. (via Reuters)

Childhood Trauma Leaves Legacy of Brain Changes
Painful experiences early in life can alter the brain in lasting ways. A difficult reality for psychiatrists and counselors of child abuse is that young victims are at high risk of becoming offenders themselves one day, although it’s unclear why. But now a team of behavioral geneticists in Switzerland report a possible reason: early psychological trauma may actually cause lasting changes in the brain that promote aggressive behavior in adulthood. (via TIME)

Sleep Stealers: What’s Keeping Children From Getting Enough Shut-Eye?
The latest research homes in on the biggest sleep robber. Children are sleeping less, and there’s no shortage of reasons why: with television, video games and the internet, they are finding it harder to shut down and go to sleep. (via TIME)

Some Children Lose Autism Diagnosis: Small Group With Confirmed Autism On Par With Mainstream Peers
Some children who are accurately diagnosed in early childhood with autism lose the symptoms and the diagnosis as they grow older, a study supported by the National Institutes of Health has confirmed. The research team made the finding by carefully documenting a prior diagnosis of autism in a small group of school-age children and young adults with no current symptoms of the disorder. (via Science Daily)

Risk To All Ages: 100 Kids Die of Flu Each Year
How bad is this flu season exactly? Look to the children. Twenty flu-related deaths have been reported in kids so far this winter, one of the worst tolls this early in the year since the government started keeping track in 2004. (via Yahoo News)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, November 27th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Autism Risk for Developing Children Exposed to Air Pollution: Infant Brain May Be Affected by Air Quality
Research demonstrates that polluted air — whether regional pollution or coming from local traffic sources — is associated with autism. (via ScienceDaily)

Study Leaves Women with Conflicting Advice on Mammograms
Controversial U.S. guidelines for mammography issued in 2009, calling for screening every two years rather than annually for women over 50 years old, can result in breast cancers being missed, according to U.S. researchers studying the hotly debated topic. (via Reuters)

U.S. Children Get Recommended Amounts of Sleep: Study
While parents may sometimes despair of their children getting enough shut-eye, especially with age-old stalling tactics of another story or another glass of water, children in the United States do appear to be getting the recommended amount of sleep. (via Reuters)

Cognitive Behavior Therapy Improves Quality of Life in Children With Asthma and Anxiety
Researchers have found that a program of cognitive behavior therapy delivered by nurses to children who had asthma and anxiety improved the children’s quality of life scores and reduced the risk of escalation of treatment. (via ScienceDaily)

7-Year-Old Girl One of Oregon’s Youngest Medical Marijuana Patients
A 7-year-old girl suffering from leukemia is one of Oregon’s youngest medical marijuana patients. (via Fox News)

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