Posts Tagged ‘ skin cancer ’

Today is Melanoma Monday

Monday, May 6th, 2013

I have a confession to make: I haven’t always been good about putting on sunscreen. I remember a few summers in particular—two when I was a lifeguard, the third when I was a canoeing counselor—when I’d hastily slather on a bit of block in the beginning of the summer (never reapplying, of course), then by the end of August, I’d head off to work with perhaps a few dabs on my shoulders and nose. I’ve since reformed my ways, but knowing that 1 in 5 Americans will be diagnosed with skin cancer in their lifetime makes me wish I had become sunscreen savvy a little sooner.

 

In my effort to take better care of my skin now, I asked Latanya Benjamin, M.D., a dermatologist at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital in Menlo Park, California, to give me (and you!) a quick reminder of sun-safe practices:

  • Look for broad-spectrum sunscreens, which block both UVA and UVB rays, with an SPF between 30 and 50.
  • Check the active ingredients list for titanium dioxide and zinc oxide, which are especially good for kids’ sensitive skin.
  • Put it on before you leave your house and reapply every two hours. A golf ball’s worth of sunscreen will cover the entire body.
  • Whenever possible, stay inside or seek shade between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. when the sun’s rays are strongest.
  • In addition to sunscreen, wear a wide-brimmed hat, sunglasses, and loose fitting, long-sleeved shirts and pants when you’re in the sun.

 

Finally, I also plan to take part in one of the free skin cancer screenings happening in New York in May. It’s sobering to think that just one blistering sunburn in childhood can double your risk of developing melanoma, but since I can’t change my past, it helps to know that, when caught early, skin cancer is very treatable. Find a screening in your area by clicking here.

 

 Image: Mom putting sunscreen on her child via Shutterstock.

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, July 3rd, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Fewer Younger Women Are Getting Mammograms
The number of women in their 40s undergoing mammograms slightly declined, says a new study carried out by the Mayo Clinic. The study found a drop of roughly 6 percent in the number of mammograms among these younger women, a change that the researchers called modest but still significant. (via NY Times)

Coffee May Help Protect Against Skin Cancer
Protection against skin cancer can be added to the list of health benefits that come with drinking coffee, a new study says. Women who drank more than three cups of coffee daily were 21 percent less likely to develop basal cell carcinoma, compared with women who drank less than one cup of caffeinated coffee per month, the study showed. For men, this risk reduction was 10 percent. (via msnbc.com)

Nearly 1 in 3 Teens Sext, Says Study
Nearly 1 in 3 teens has sent a nude picture of him or herself to someone else, and more than half have been asked to do so, according to new research on nearly 1,000 Texas teens. The study, published Monday in the Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, also found that teen “sexting” is strongly linked to actual sexual behavior. (via TIME)

Parents Defend Letting Daughter, 5, Swim With Sharks
When Elana and David Barnes posted a home video to YouTube of their 5-year-old daughter swimming in the ocean, they intended to share their vacation memories with friends and family, not the world. But the video quickly became a viral sensation because it shows their daughter, Anaia, not just frolicking in the water but snorkeling with sharks in the waters off the Bahamas. (via ABC News)

Is This Teen Angst or an Uncontrollable Anger Disorder?
With all those raging hormones, every teenager is bound to “lose it” at one time or another. But a recent study suggests that adolescents’ attacks of anger may indicate something more serious than your standard puberty-related mood swings. (via TIME)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Monday, May 14th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Bottles, Binkies and Sippy Cups Can Hurt Kids, Study Finds
The seemingly innocuous ba-bas and binkies caused cuts, bruises and other injuries serious enough to send 45,398 children under age 3 to the nation’s emergency rooms between 1991 and 2010, according to the first large-scale analysis of the problem.

Can You Call a 9-Year-Old a Psychopath?
Psychologists now believe fledgling psychopaths can be identified as early as kindergarten. The hope is to teach these children empathy before it’s too late.

More Batteries to Blame for Kids’ ER Visits
The number of kids treated in emergency rooms after swallowing batteries — or lodging them in their noses and ears — has almost doubled over the past 20 years, a new study suggests.

So Eager for Grandchildren, They’re Paying the Egg-Freezing Clinic
The practice of freezing eggs to enable a pregnancy later on is growing, doctors say, with parents lending emotional and financial support to adult daughters.

The List Is Out! Top Baby Names for 2011 Are…
The Social Security Administration released its top 1,000 baby name list for 2011 on Monday morning.

FDA Delays New Rules for Sunscreen
Sunscreen confusion won’t be over before summer after all. The government is bowing to industry requests for more time to make clear how much protection their brands really offer against skin cancer.

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Wednesday, April 4th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

‘Pink Slime’ in Your Meat? Labels to Tell You, USDA Says
As consumers clamor for more transparency about the beef product dubbed “pink slime,” federal agriculture officials have agreed to allow several meat producers to list the stuff on package labels.

For Young Women, Melanoma Rates on the Rise
In the past four decades, the incidence of melanoma has increased eight-fold among women ages 18 – 39.

Texas Granny Won Tug-of-War With Tornado Over Grandson
A Texas grandmother explained today how she piled three children into a bathtub to survive a rampaging tornado and hung on to a toddler’s feet as the twister tried to suck the boy into its vortex.

Child Abuse Pediatricians Recommend Basic Parenting Classes to Reduce Maltreatment and Neglect
A new sub-specialty of doctors — child abuse pediatricians — are certified as experts in determining whether a broken bone or a bruise is accidental or intentional.

Gay Student Sues Ohio school District Over T-Shirt
A gay student whose southwest Ohio high school prohibited him from wearing a T-shirt designed to urge tolerance of gays is suing the school, saying it’s violating his freedom of expression rights.

Film Inspired by ‘Abortion Survivor’ Is Quiet Hit
“October Baby,” inspired by a woman who claims to be an “abortion survivor,” is doing well in movie theaters.

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New Guidelines on Reducing Risk of Skin Cancer in Children

Monday, February 28th, 2011

cute-babyToday the American Academy of Pediatrics issued a new statement and policy urging parents to limit their children’s sun exposure.  The AAP’s statement, including a report titled “Ultraviolet Radiation: a Hazard to Children and Adolescents,” offers guidelines on how to reduce the risk of skin cancer in children.

Skin cancer, including the most serious condition known as melanoma, continues to increase in children and in female teens who visit tanning salons and are constantly exposed to ultraviolet radiation. 

Along with wearing sunscreen, sunglasses, and appropriate clothing and hats, the new policy suggests children should limit and minimize outdoor activities during peak midday sun hours (10 am – 4 pm).  Children 6 months and younger should be covered at all times and kept out of direct sunlight.  The policy also urges support of a new legislation that will prohibit children under 18 from using tanning devices or going to tanning salons.

According to Thomas Rohrer, M.D., Secretary of the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, “melanoma is the most common skin cancer in children. In addition, only six severe sunburns in a lifetime increase risk of melanoma by 50 percent. It is important that parents, teachers and physicians encourage sun avoidance and protection by monitoring their children’s moles and freckles for the ABCDEs—asymmetry, border irregularity, color variation, diameter, and evolving; encourage children to wear at least 30 SPF sunscreen and reapply it every two to three hours spent outdoors…One study estimated a 78% drop in skin cancer risk if parents protect their children from significant sun exposure in the first 18 years of life.”

Children who freckle and burn easily because of fair skin and light eyes should be extra careful, as well as children with a family history of melanoma.  Protecting your children from an early age will go a long way in preventing signs of skin cancer.

Read skin cancer prevention tips on Parents.com:

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