Posts Tagged ‘ self-control ’

Elmo and Murray from Sesame Street–Live In Our Office!

Thursday, September 19th, 2013

Yesterday we had the pleasure of hanging out with Elmo and Murray, who dropped by to help spread the word about Sesame Street‘s 44th season, which kicked off Monday. (That’s me and Michael Kress, executive editor of Parents.com, proudly posing with the muppets.) The theme of the season is self-regulation, otherwise known as that thing most of our kids haven’t quite mastered. The shows will focus on helping children master skills like managing emotions, making transitions, being flexible, screening out distractions, and remembering rules–all of which will help them in school, or help them get ready for school.

We asked Elmo and Murray all kinds of questions: Do you ever get so frustrated that you want to push or hit someone? What happens when your mom and dad serve you a meal that you really don’t like? Do you fight with your siblings? (They don’t have any, but they still had a good answer about getting along with others.) You’ll see what they had to say in a fun video series we’ll show you soon–and you can show your own children as a way to get them on board with good behaviors. (I know I’ll be showing my girls what Murray had to say about trying foods he doesn’t think he’s going to like.) In the meantime, have your children check out the new season of “Sesame Street”–though I’ll bet they are already–which includes a new segment called “Cookie’s Crumby Pictures,” movie spoofs that show Cookie encountering all kinds of opportunities to show off his self-regulation skills.

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, August 16th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Job Losses Persist for the Less-Educated
After suffering the largest share of job losses in the recession, Americans with no more than a high school education have continued to lose jobs during the sputtering recovery while better-educated people have gained millions of jobs, according to a Georgetown University study. (via New York Times)

Blood Type Might Be a Clue to Heart Disease Risk
People who have blood types A, B, or AB have a slightly higher risk of heart disease compared to those with type O, the most common kind, according to research released Tuesday. (via Associated Press)

U.S. Kids Downing More Diet Drinks
The number of U.S. children who drink sugar-free beverages has doubled in the past decade, a new study finds. (via Reuters)

Chemical in Antibacterical Soap Weakens Muscle Function
A new study questions the safety of triclosan, a common chemical in antibacterial products like soap, toothpaste and mouthwash. (via Time)

Children’s Self Control is Associated with Their Body Mass Index as Adults
A new study scheduled for publication in The Journal of Pediatrics finds that delaying gratification longer at 4 years of age is associated with having a lower body mass index (BMI) 30 years later. (via Science Daily)

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Children with Self-Control May Become Successful Adults

Tuesday, February 1st, 2011

disciplineIf your 3-year-old shows remarkable self-control, congratulations: Your child will most likely become a successful adult.

A New Zealand study recently published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences involved scientists following 1,000 children from birth to adulthood.  The study analyzed the children’s “health, wealth, family and criminal status when the participants reached age 32, then looked for correlations between the self-control score and these outcomes, correcting, for I.Q. and socioeconomic status” (MSNBC.com)

The study revealed that children who displayed self-control at 3-years-old made less bad judgments when they were teens, such as smoking cigarettes, taking drugs, dropping out of school, and getting pregnant.  According to ScienceDaily, self-control was defined by factors such as a child’s threshold for tolerance, persistence in sticking with and executing goals, ability to think before acting, and patience in waiting.  Children who either learned or grew up teaching themselves discipline and self-control had a better future that didn’t include credit card debts, substance abuse, or low self-esteem. 

So instead of just natural intelligence, self-control can be important in propeling children to success.

Does your child have good self-control? What parenting tips do you have to help your kids to be more disciplined?

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