Posts Tagged ‘ schools ’

Parents Daily News Roundup

Friday, November 2nd, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Fewer U.S. Kids Dying of Diabetes
According to federal health officials, the 61% decrease of kids dying of diabetes is due to better treatment and increased awareness. (via HealthDay)

Study Finds Healthy Snacks Still Limited in Some U.S. Schools
U.S. school children searching for a healthy snack at school may find a bag of potato chips is much easier to come by, a new report says. (via Reuters)

A Little Exercise May Help Kids with ADHD Focus
Twenty minutes of exercise may help kids with ADHD settle in to read or solve a math problem, new research suggests. (via Fox News)

Parents’ Anxiety Can Trickle Down to Kids
A new study suggests children are at a higher risk of developing anxiety if a parent has a social anxiety disorder. (via PsychCentral)

Church-Going Teens Go Further With School
Sociologists have found that religiously-affiliated youth are 40 percent more likely to graduate high school than their unaffiliated peers, and 70 percent more likely to enroll in college. (via ScienceDaily)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Friday, October 26th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Good Bacteria During Pregnancy May Ward Off Eczema
Babies were less likely to get an itchy skin rash when their mothers took probiotics during pregnancy and while breastfeeding, according to a new study. (via Reuters)

Parents Who Argue Over Money Connected to Overspending by Kids
In a new study, students who specifically responded that “my parents usually argued about finances” were twice as likely to have more than two credit cards than those who said their parents didn’t argue over money, and three times as likely to have a large amount of debt. (via Time)

Texas Schools Begin Tracking Students With Computer Chips in ID Cards
Two schools in San Antonio have begun tracking students using radio-enabled computer chips embedded in their ID cards, allowing administrators to know the precise whereabouts of their charges on campus. (via NBC News)

Why Fertile Women Are More Aloof
According to a new study, ladies who settled down with Mr. Stable over Mr. Steamy are less likely to be sexually attracted to their partner during their most fertile period than women who paired up with sexually-desirable men. (via Time)

Pregnant Mothers on Anti-Depressants Are Putting Babies At Risk, Warn Scientists
Thousands of women who take anti-depressants during pregnancy are endangering their unborn babies, researchers have warned. (via Daily Mail)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, October 18th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Fewer Children for Women After Ectopic Pregnancy
Women whose first pregnancy is ectopic have fewer children and are at increased risk for another ectopic pregnancy, a new study says. (via HealthDay News)

Children With Autism Can Identify Misbehavior But Have Trouble Putting it in Words
New brain imaging studies show that children with autism may recognize socially inappropriate behavior, but have difficulty using spoken language to explain why the behavior is considered inappropriate. (via ScienceDaily)

Florida School Officials Defend Racial and Ethnic Learning Goals
When the Florida Board of Education voted this month to set different goals for student achievement in reading and math by race and ethnicity, among other guidelines, the move was widely criticized as discriminatory and harmful to blacks and Hispanics. But the state intends to stand by its new strategic plan. (via New York Times)

Prolonged Formula Feeding, Delay in Solid Foods Associated with Increased Risk for Leukemia
Results of one study indicate that the risk for developing pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia increased the longer a baby was fed formula and the longer solid foods were delayed. (via ScienceDaily)

Some Parents Misunderstand Kids’ Cancer Studies
Children with incurable cancer can take part in early trials of a new drug’s safety, but many parents may misunderstand the goals of those studies, new research finds. (via Reuters)

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5 Essential Back-to-School Tips for Parents

Tuesday, September 4th, 2012

Back to School colored pencilsEditor’s Note: In a post for an ongoing series, Dr. Harley A. Rotbart, a Parents advisor, will be guest blogging once a month. He will be offering different advice, tips, and personal stories on how parents can “savor the moment” and maximize the time they spend with kids. Read more posts by Harley Rotbart from this series.

Ready or not, it’s that time again. Your kids are trying on fall clothes, cleaning out backpacks from last year, and shopping for school supplies. Another exciting year of growth and development is on the horizon for your children. Here are five sure-fire ways to make this a year of growth and development for you as well.

Hold a weekly calendar meeting.

Each new year of school brings more complicated choreography to your kids’ schedules – and to your schedule as well. Every Sunday night, sit down with your kids and enter every commitment and event of their upcoming week into your personal calendar. There are 3 important reasons to do this: a) you should always know where your kids are; b) you have a head start on dinner conversation if you know what your kids have been up to all day; c) you may get a pleasant surprise – a meeting of yours is canceled in time for you to make the second half of a basketball game. But you’ll only know about the game if it’s on your calendar.

Volunteer at school.

Every school is underfunded and shorthanded. Your kids’ school can use your help and participating in an after-school activity can be a meaningful experience. Depending on your kids’ ages and their level of pride (or embarrassment) in seeing you at school, there are many roles to fill: homeroom parent, teacher’s aide, hall monitor, coach’s assistant, team parent, crossing guard, PTA, office volunteer, and field trip chaperone or driver, to name a few.  Spending a part of your day at school gives you an up-close look at interactions with teachers and friends, hallway dynamics, and locker lore. All this can lead to more good dinner conversation!

Drive a carpool.

Whether it’s driving back and forth to school or to and from after-school activities you learn a lot about your kids by driving the carpool. Mysteriously, the carpool driver becomes practically invisible to the passengers, especially when it’s more than just your own kids in the car. This allows you an invaluable “fly on the dashboard” opportunity to eavesdrop on your kids social interactions, catch up on grade school gossip, and hear about homework without even asking.

Help with homework.

Be involved with your kids’ homework every night. When they’re in grade school, sit with them for part of the time they’re doing work – not to catch every math mistake but to make sure they get the big picture. In middle school, just look over their completed work regularly for overall quality. Show you are happy to see them doing such a nice job. Your pride in their work will become their pride. By high school, it’s enough to ask each night if they’ve finished their homework and occasionally review a teacher’s comments on the graded work.  No matter the age, if your kids ask for help, do your best to guide them without doing their homework. Remember, you’ve already learned “times tables,” so now it’s their turn.

Manage extracurricular activities.

Beware of “potpourri parenting” – soccer Mondays, violin Tuesdays, karate Wednesdays, etc. Kids’ options for extracurricular activities are limitless, and you may be tempted to enroll your kids in everything, thinking you’re “enriching” them.  As long as your kids are enjoying these activities, and you’re not missing chances to spend more time with them, there’s nothing wrong with having many varied experiences. But if programming begins to replace parenting or if your kids are showing “enrichment fatigue,” reduce the amount of activities. Your time together as a family is almost always more enriching, especially since time with your young kids is fleeting. Don’t give it all away.

The school years won’t seem to pass by as quickly if you get involved in your kids’ school lives. So have a wonderful fall semester!

Dr. Harley A. Rotbart

Dr. Harley A. Rotbart is Professor and Vice Chairman of Pediatrics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and Children’s Hospital Colorado.  He is the author of three books for parents and families, including the recent No Regrets Parenting, a Parents advisor, and a contributor to The New York Times Motherlode blog. Visit his blog at noregretsparenting.com and follow him on Facebook and Twitter (@NoRegretsParent).


Image: “Back to school” and colored pencils via Shutterstock

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, August 7th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Some Schools Add Days to Academic Year to Increase Learning Time
According to the National Center on Time and Learning, a nonprofit research group in Boston, about 170 schools — more than 140 of them charter schools — across the country have extended their calendars in recent years to 190 days or longer. (via NY Times)

Teens Who Don’t Have Sex Still at Risk for HPV
A new study conducted in Cincinnati, which involved teen girls and young women, found that 11.6 percent of those who had never had sexual intercourse were infected with at least one strain of HPV. (via NBC News)

Honey May Ease Nighttime Coughing in Kids
A spoonful of honey before bed may help little kids with a cough – and their parents – sleep through the night, a new study suggests. Parents also reported that after giving honey to kids, their coughing was less frequent and less severe. (via Reuters)

Hospital Brings 3,000 Cats to Cancer Patient
When 16-year-old cancer patient, Maga Barzallo said the thing she missed most was her cat Merry, Seattle Children’s asked Facebook fans to send in pictures of their favorite pets – and received 3,000 photos in response. The hospital staff then combined the cat photos with purring sounds to create a slideshow for the teenager. (via CNN)

Urine Test May Predict Women’s Bone Risk
Researchers report that levels of a substance called cross-linked N-telopeptide of Type 1 collagen, or NTX, which is released into the urine when bones weaken, can predict the risk for future fracture in premenopausal, asymptomatic women. (via NY Times)

Can Telling the Truth Make You Healthier?
Telling a few white lies may seem harmless, but a new study suggests that you might improve your mental and physical health if you cut down on the fibs you tell. (via TIME)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Monday, July 30th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

To Earn Classroom Certification, More Teaching and Less Testing
New York and up to 25 other states are moving toward changing the way they grant licenses to teachers, de-emphasizing tests and written essays in favor of a more demanding approach that requires aspiring teachers to prove themselves through lesson plans, homework assignments, and videotaped instruction sessions. (via NY Times)

Does Impulsiveness Give Boys Math Edge?
A new study suggests boys’ impulsive approach to math problems in the classroom may help them get ahead of girls in the long-run. The research claims girls may tend to favor a slow and accurate approach — often computing the answer by counting — while boys may take a faster, but more error-prone tack, calling out the answer from memory. (via Live Science)

Burned-Out Nurses Linked to More Infections in Patients
For every extra patient added to a nurse’s workload, there was roughly one additional hospital-acquired infection logged per 1,000 patients, according to a new study from the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing. (via NBC News)

Psychological Abuse: More Common and Equally Devastating as Other Child Maltreatment
A new study suggests psychological abuse — possibly one of the most common forms of child abuse — may be just as devastating as other forms of child abuse. Psychological maltreatment can include terrorizing, belittling, or neglecting a child, the study’s authors say. (via TIME)

Mysterious Nodding Disease Afflicts Young Ugandans
More than 300 young Ugandans have died as a result of nodding syndrome, a mysterious illness that stunts children’s growth and destroys their cognition, rendering them unable to perform small tasks. Uganda officials say some 3,000 children in the East African country suffer from the affliction. (via Associated Press)

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Flat Stanley Visits New York City

Monday, January 23rd, 2012

Recently, I spent two days with a special out-of-town guest, taking her sightseeing around New York City.  We navigated Manhattan with ease, taking on diverse areas such as Gramercy Park, Flatiron District, Midtown East, Times Square, and the Upper East Side. My guest, part of the Flat Stanley Project, never made a fuss or complained — being made of markers and laminated paper.

For parents who are unfamiliar with The Flat Stanley Project, it was started in 1995 by Dale Hubert, a teacher in Ontario, Canada, and was inspired by the Flat Stanley children’s books series by Jeff Brown.  The project involves children making paper cutouts of themselves (their personalized versions of Flat Stanley) and then mailing them to friends and family around the world.  The goal is to encourage literacy as kids write about Stanley’s adventures through his visits, and to promote pen pal exchanges.  Over 6,000 schools in 88 countries have participated in the project, and even famous folks such as President Obama and actor Clint Eastwood have been photographed with a Flat Stanley.

My friend’s young daughter sent me her Flat Stanley (from Georgia!) and my inner host and shutterbug went all-out visiting Big Apple landmarks (Empire State Building, Times Square, Rockefeller Center), historical sites (Theodore Roosevelt’s birthplace, Fifth Avenue Public Library), and some children’s paradises (Toys “R” Us, FAO Schwartz, American Girl Place). It was really fun soaking up familiar sights I wouldn’t normally visit as a New Yorker, and I’m ready for my next Flat Stanley visitor.

Parents, learn more about how to get your school involved in this global literacy project at FlatStanley.com, and make sure to download the (free) Flat Stanley app from iTunes.

Befriending a guard outside FAO Schwartz

Resting at the Alice in Wonderland statue in Central Park

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, December 15th, 2011

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Failure Rate of Schools Overstated, Study Says
A study by the Center on Education Policy says that under the No Child Left Behind law, 48 percent of schools would be labeled as failing this year — not 82 percent.

Marijuana Use Growing Among Teenagers
Marijuana use among teenagers has reached a 30-year peak even as use of alcohol, cigarettes and cocaine continues a slow decline, according to a new government report.

Ohio Boy Who Weighed 200 Pounds to Live with Uncle
A boy removed from his mother’s custody over health concerns when his weight ballooned to more than 200 pounds will be taken from foster care and placed in the custody of an uncle, a judge ruled Wednesday.

Utah School Outs Student to Parents
A Utah middle school is defending its decision to out a student to his parents as a “proactive” move to prevent bullying.

Palm-Sized Baby, Just Over 9 Ounces, Is Growing
At birth, Melinda Star Guido was so tiny she could fit into the palm of her doctor’s hand. Weighing just 9 1/2 ounces, she is among the smallest babies ever born in the world. Most infants her size don’t survive, but doctors are preparing to send her home by New Year’s.

Accidental Drug Overdoses on the Rise Among Kids
Researchers say more than 60,000 young children in the U.S. are treated in emergency rooms each year for accidental overdoses because they got into medicines when their parent or caregiver wasn’t looking.

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