Posts Tagged ‘ school shooting ’

Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, March 14th, 2013

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Newtown Children Remain Scared As School Tries to Move on from Sandy Hook Shooting
They relocated the entire student body to a new school unstained by blood. They brought in counselors to soothe shattered nerves, and parents to comfort the distraught. But authorities know they cannot erase the lingering effects of the massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School – students and faculty members still on edge, still traumatized by the sounds of gunshots and by the horrors they survived. (via Huffington Post)

Michelle Obama ‘Vogue’ Interview: First Lady Says Family is No.1 Priority
Michelle Obama is pushing back against the notion that she and President Barack Obama don’t socialize enough in Washington. The first lady says in an interview in the April issue of Vogue magazine that she and the president were straightforward when they said – before moving from Chicago to Washington in 2009 – that their family, including two young daughters, would be their priority. (via Huffington Post)

Drug Treatment Corrects Autism Symptoms in Mouse Model
Autism results from abnormal cell communication. Testing a new theory, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have used a newly discovered function of an old drug to restore cell communications in a mouse model of autism, reversing symptoms of the devastating disorder. (via Science Daily)

No Attention-Boosting Drugs for Healthy Kids, Doctors Urge
The American Academy of Neurology (AAN), the world’s largest professional association of neurologists, is releasing a position paper on how the practice of prescribing drugs to boost cognitive function, or memory and thinking abilities, in healthy children and teens is misguided. (via Science Daily)

Rare Meat Allergy Linked to Ticks Found in Kids
Some children living in the U.S. Southeast have a rare meat allergy linked to tick bites, according to a new study. Bites from ticks, usually lone star ticks, cause the body to become allergic to a protein called alpha-gal — which also happens to be found in some mammals, including cows, pigs and sheep, the researchers said. (via Fox News)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Friday, February 1st, 2013

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Novartis Recalls Cough Syrups Due to Cap Seal Defect
Novartis AG said on Thursday it is recalling 183 lots of cough syrup after discovering the child-resistant feature on some bottle caps was not functioning correctly. (via Reuters)

DaNita Wilson, Georgia Teacher, Accused Of Having Sex With 7 High School Students (VIDEO)
Georgia high school teacher DaNita Wilson was arrested Tuesday after the Georgia Bureau of Investigation (GBI) launched an inquiry into her conduct. (via Huffington Post)

Voucher Expansion Proposed By Ohio Gov. Kasich: Ed Today
Vouchers To Grow In Ohio? In Ohio, Gov. John Kasich’s (R) budget plan would reduce funding gaps between wealthy and poor public school districts and also create a new voucher program, reports the Columbus Dispatch. (via Huffington Post)

Childhood Obesity Linked to Multiple Sclerosis
A new study has found an association between childhood obesity and the risk of multiple sclerosis (MS) in children and teenagers. Though still rare, pediatric MS is more common now than it was 30 years ago. (via Fox News)

Price Middle School Shooting: Wounded Student Recovering After Fellow Teen Opened Fire
A student opened fire at his middle school Thursday afternoon, wounding a 14-year-old in the neck before an armed officer working at the school was able to get the gun away, police said. (via Huffington Post)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Wednesday, January 30th, 2013

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Activists to U.S. Education Department: Stop School Closings Now
Activists fighting school closings across the country converged at the U.S. Education Department on Tuesday to demand federal action to stop the shutdowns, which they say disproportionately affect poor and minority students. (via The Washington Post)

Excessive Alcohol Use When You’re Young Could Have Lasting Impacts On Your Brain
There is growing evidence for the lasting impact of alcohol on the brain. Excessive alcohol use accounts for 4% of the global burden of disease, and binge drinking particularly is becoming an increasing health issue. (via Science Daily)

Illinois School Shooting Drill: Cary-Grove High School to Fire Blanks In Hallway, Angering Parents
A suburban Chicago high school is planning to hold a controversial and unprecedented new drill: a simulation of a “code red simulation” that will involve the firing of blank bullets in the hallway in an effort to give students and staff “some familiarity with the sound of gunfire.” (via Huffington Post)

School Closures Violate Civil Rights, Protesters Tell Arne Duncan
The standards-based education reform movement calls school change “the civil rights issue of our time.” But about 220 mostly African American community organizers, parents and students from 21 cities from New York to Oakland, Calif., converged on Washington Tuesday to tell U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan he’s getting it backwards on school closures. (via Huffington Post)

GOP Bill That Would Allow Teachers To Carry Concealed Weapons Rejected In Colorado
Colorado teachers will not be carrying concealed weapons at schools any time soon. In Senate committee on Monday, Colorado Democrats rejected a Republican bill that would allow teachers to carry concealed weapons on school grounds. (via Huffington Post)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Friday, January 11th, 2013

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Education Rankings, Anti-Common Core Alliance: Ed Today
Education Week released its Quality Counts report, one of the most comprehensive education rankings in the United States. (via Huffington Post)

Carolyn Cain, Utah Teacher On The Ed Show: Teachers Should Carry Guns Without Telling Parents, Students
A Utah teacher doesn’t think parents “necessarily” have a right to know that their child’s educator is carrying a concealed weapon in the classroom. (via Huffington Post)

Taft Union High School Teacher, Campus Supervisor ‘Talked Down’ Shooter, Deputy Says
A 16-year-old student armed with a shotgun walked into a rural California high school on Thursday, shot one student and fired at others and missed before a teacher and another staff member talked him into surrendering, officials said. (via Huffington Post)

Smartphone App Helps Children With Autism Communicate Better
A smartphone application that has potential to help children with autism communicate more effectively is now available for download. (via Science Daily)

Judge Won’t Block New York City Circumcision Law
A Manhattan federal judge refused to block a New York City regulation requiring people who perform circumcisions and use their mouths to draw away blood from the wound on a baby’s penis to first obtain written consent from the parents. (via Reuters)

Screen Time Not Linked to Kids’ Physical Activity
Cutting back kids’ time watching TV and playing video games may not encourage them to spend more of the day running around outside, a new study suggests. (via Reuters)

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Teach Your Kids (And Yourself) What to Do if You’re in a Situation Like Sandy Hook

Tuesday, December 18th, 2012

One of the things that makes the tragedy at Sandy Hook Elementary even more horrifying to me is that the school seems to have done everything right—the building was locked and had a camera surveillance system, the teachers were well-trained in emergency procedures—but it still didn’t prevent Adam Lanza from getting in and killing 26 people.

Safety experts like Trevor Pyle, who has worked with many top disaster and emergency service agencies, stress that the tragedy could have been much worse. “The teachers and staff did the right thing, and their actions saved countless lives,” he told me in an interview.

There are certain behaviors that could make it more likely for you (and your child) to make it out of a situation like that alive—like six-year-old Aidan Licata and his friends, who ran when the opportunity presented itself, or one little girl, the only survivor from her classroom, who played dead. Here’s what Pyle suggests:

For kids:

• Tell them to listen to their teachers and school staff members. They receive extensive training on what to do and how to take care of the children. So tell them to recognize when the teacher is serious, and follow directions.

• Make sure that they pay attention during the drills, and know what to do when they are told to evacuate.

• Tell them to tell an adult if something appears to be “weird,” and that they aren’t going to get in trouble if they are wrong. Better to be safe than sorry. If they see something, make sure they say something.

For adults:

• Always know where at least two exits are. If you can, escape. If you can’t, hide. If you have to, fight with everything you have.

• If you can run, bring everyone you can with you. Get out of the building, and don’t stop until you find cover. Warn other people away from the building and call 911. Report your location. When cops arrive, keep your hands clear and don’t approach them. They aren’t there to rescue you, they are there to stop the shooter.

• If you have to hide, close and lock the door, turn out the lights, and mute your cell phone. Don’t move until the cops arrive.

• If you have to fight, improvise a weapon and attack. Target the shooter’s head, and torso. Do not hesitate, and don’t stop until he is down.

Hopefully, this is the kind of information you won’t ever have to use—but it may just save your life.

For more information and resources regarding the Sandy Hook Tragedy, visit the following on Parents.com:

Photo: © Vividz Foto/Shutterstock.com

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What to Say About the Sandy Hook Tragedy Before School Tomorrow

Sunday, December 16th, 2012

I tried hard to shield my children, ages 4 and 7, from what happened in Connecticut, taking the advice of so many mental health professionals who advise telling young kids as little as possible about the events. But as I’m sure lots of you experienced yourselves, it’s nearly impossible, even if you kept the TV off all weekend, as we have. For our family, the radio interrupted 24/7 holiday music with condolences to the families of Newtown; going online offered a glimpse of CNN’s home page; and even a trip to the bagel store, where three piles of newspapers sat by the door, revealed too much. So like many parents, we’re having some tough conversations and doing the best we can.

What I’m concerned about now is what may come up at school tomorrow. My 2nd-grader’s teacher has notified us that she’ll say nothing of the events, though if it comes up she’ll discuss it as briefly and simply as possible, which I appreciate. I feel like I need to say a little more to my daughter before she returns to school, though, and I was glad when I got an email from a friend who works with the New Jersey nonprofit Good Grief, which helps children and teens cope with loss. She forwarded these words of guidance from Good Grief’s associate executive director, Joe Primo; perhaps you’ll find them useful, too.

Having a conversation about the shooting this weekend is probably a smart and important thing to do before school on Monday.  Classmates will have their own interpretation of the events; many of those narratives will have been learned this weekend from the media and the adults in their lives. There is not a lot we control about these events, but we can play a big role in how our children hear and come to understand the events. We can best support our children by having an honest dialogue that helps build coping skills and taps into their inherent resiliency. Below is a script you might try.

Adult: So, Alex, have you heard about the sad thing that happened to a school in Connecticut?
Don’t assume Alex doesn’t already know. She may have picked it up already.
Adult: Somebody hurt a lot of children with a gun. It’s very sad. Children died.
WAIT to see how the child responds.
Adult: I think a lot of your friends and teachers will be talking about it on Monday. I would like us to talk about it too.
Allow the conversation to happen and be spontaneous. Here are some things you should know about reactions:
  • No child ever responds the same
  • Children may have an increased sense of fear for their safety
  • Children may be afraid to return to school or name “scary kids” in their school
  • Child process information in fragments. They may take it in and then quickly move onto something else.
Adult: I wonder how these things happen.
Wait to see if the child has ideas of her own.
Adult: Assure the child that their school (name administrators and teachers) works hard to keep them safe. You can encourage them to listen to their teachers about safety protocol. Assure them of your love and allow them to explore their reactions.
Often times, being together and offering each other love are the most meaningful things we can tell our children.
For more on the Sandy Hook tragedy, visit the following on Parents.com:
Image via Good Grief.
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The Tragedy in Sandy Hook

Friday, December 14th, 2012

It’s hard to find the right words—or really any words—to describe what happened today. For what happened today at Sandy Hook School in Newtown, Connecticut, was every parent’s worst nightmare, made real and flashed on the TV news. What I see is a school that’s virtually identical to my daughters’ idyllic little elementary school, and parents and kids who look like our friends. And words fail me as I think of my friends rushing toward the school, and a scenario where some walk out, teary-eyed and clutching their children close—and some don’t. What are the right words for that?

There will be much to talk about in the days and weeks to follow, as more information comes out about what occurred, and who was lost, and why this happened. As we begin to dissect our country’s deep failings: Our inability to pass gun laws that keep dangerous weapons out of the hands of those who shouldn’t have them; our lack of care for the mentally ill (for surely, a person who would plot and plan to attack children with an arsenal of assault weapons must be mentally ill); and our inability to keep even our youngest children safe from harm. And as we, hopefully, push for the changes we need to make to prevent another Columbine, another Virginia Tech, and now, another Sandy Hook.

Right now, these are the only words I can find: Our kids deserve a better world than this. And we need to work together to make it happen.

For information and resources on dealing with the tragedy, visit the following on Parents.com:

Image: fasphotographic /Shutterstock.com

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, April 5th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Studies Show Genes Play Major Role in Autism
A sweeping study of hundreds of families with autism has found that spontaneous mutations can occur in a parent’s sperm or egg cells that increase a child’s risk for autism, and fathers are four times more likely than mothers to pass these mutations on to their children, researchers said on Wednesday.

Birth Control Shots Tied to Breast Cancer Risk, Study Says
Recent use of the injectable contraceptive Depo-Provera for at least a year was associated with a doubling of young women’s breast cancer risk, a new study has found.

Washington Boy, 9, Writes Apology to Girl He Shot
A 9-year-old boy in Bremerton, Wash. wrote a letter apologizing to a classmate who was seriously wounded after a gun discharged from his backpack, lodging a bullet in her spine.

Maid’s Cries Cast Light on Child Labor in India
A 13-year-old girl who worked as a maid reportedly led a life akin to slavery, in a symptom of India’s growing middle class and its demand for domestic workers, jobs often filled by children.

Frozen Assets: Why American Sperm Is a Hot Commodity
The U.S. is by far the largest exporter of human sperm in the world. Every year tens of thousands of vials go to more than 60 countries.

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