Posts Tagged ‘ school safety ’

Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, May 2nd, 2013

Oregon Teachers Fail Active Shooter Drill As Masked Men Shoot Blanks At Surprised Faculty
Cammie DeCastro, principal of the Pine Eagle Charter School in Halfway, Ore., admits that the plan she had to protect her school from an armed gunman is in tatters after two masked men stormed in and appeared to open fire on a meeting room full of teachers last Friday, The Oregonian reports. (via Huffington Post)

Shedding Light On the Long Shadow of Childhood Adversity
Childhood adversity can lead to chronic physical and mental disability in adult life and have an effect on the next generation, underscoring the importance of research, practice and policy in addressing this issue, according to a Viewpoint in the May 1 issue of JAMA, a theme issue on child health. (via Science Daily)

Food, skin allergies increasing in children
Parents are reporting more skin and food allergies in their children, a big government survey found. (via Fox News)

Traffic noise linked with kids’ hyperactivity
Children who live near a noisy road may be at an increased risk of hyperactivity, according to a new study from Germany. (via Fox News)

Amusement rides linked to 4,000 injuries in children each year
Nervous parents may fret about dangerous-looking roller coasters with precipitous drops, or rusty Ferris wheels in traveling fairs, but it turns out that for young children, coin-operated rides in malls and restaurants may be more of a cause for concern than expected, according to a new study. (via Fox News)

Kiera Wilmot, 16, Arrested And Expelled For Explosive ‘Science Experiment’
Wilmot, a Bartow High School student, was arrested at her school last week for allegedly detonating a water bottle filled with an explosive concoction of common household chemicals. (via Huffington Post)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Monday, March 18th, 2013

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Armed Teachers Bill: Florida Rep. Greg Steube Meets Opposition In School Boards
Your child’s third-grade teacher might be packing more than a lesson plan in the classroom if a bill designed to make schools safer becomes law. (via Huffington Post)

Denver School Cheating, Moody’s Likes Philly School Closings: Ed Today
According to Ed News Colorado, about 35 high school students figured out how to go into their teachers’ computer system. They changed their grades on instant “mastery tests” to make it look as if they’d entered the correct answers in the first place. (via Huffington Post)

Despite Evidence, Parents’ Fears of HPV Vaccine Grow
More parents of teen girls not fully vaccinated against human papillomavirus (HPV) are intending to forgo the shots altogether – a trend driven by vaccine safety concerns, new research suggests. (via Reuters)

Grandparents Stepping Up to Help Fund Grandkids’ Education
Go to a workshop on how to pay for your kids’ college education, and you’ll see more gray hair in the audience than in years past. (via Today)

Faced With Eviction and Medical Bills, Parents Take Kids Along for Crime
Police in Utah say they’ve arrested a husband and wife bank robbery team that took their two young children along for the ride. (via ABC News)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, March 7th, 2013

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Simpsonville S.C. Places Police Officers in Elementary Schools at No Extra Cost
Every school day, Simpsonville, S.C., police officer Justin Chandler patrols the halls of Plain Elementary School. But Chandler is not a school resource officer, a position typically filled by specially trained officers who are stationed at schools to bolster security. Unlike many armed guards in public schools, Chandler’s position comes at no extra cost to local taxpayers. (via Huffington Post)

Seattle School Discipline Practices Under Investigation for Racial Bias
The U.S. Education Department is investigating whether Seattle’s public school district discriminates against black students by subjecting them to tougher and more frequent discipline than white students, agency and district officials said. (via Huffington Post)

U.S. Doctor’s Gutsy Move Led to Baby’s Cure from HIV
The doctor who cured an HIV infected baby for the first time is happier talking to children than to adults and is finding all the attention since the news came out a little overwhelming. (via Reuters)

Do More Women Need Diabetes Care When Pregnant?
A change in testing could nearly triple the number of women diagnosed with diabetes during pregnancy, but would catching milder cases help mother or baby? A government panel is urging more research to find that out before doctors make the switch. (via Fox News)

News Corp. Has a Tablet for Schools
For nearly two years, Joel I. Klein helped Rupert Murdoch and News Corporation weather a phone hacking scandal at the company’s British tabloids with the promise that he would eventually be able to return to the role the company hired him for: to spearhead News Corporation’s new venture into the public school market. That day has finally come. (via The New York Times)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Monday, January 28th, 2013

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Pediatricians Issue First-Ever Diabetes Guidelines for Children
With childhood obesity rates on the rise, pediatricians are doing something they couldn’t have imagined a need for a decade ago: they’re debuting guidelines for managing weight-related diabetes among youngsters. (via TIME)

Top K-12 Senator Tom Harkin to Retire
Sen. Tom Harkin, an Iowa Democrat who sits at the top of the Senate panels that deal with both K-12 spending and policy, isn’t planning to seek re-election in 2014. This is a very big deal: Harkin is arguably the most powerful lawmaker in Congress when it comes to education. (via Education Week)

Diet, Parental Behavior and Preschool Can Boost Children’s IQ
Supplementing children’s diets with fish oil, enrolling them in quality preschool, and engaging them in interactive reading all turn out to be effective ways to raise a young child’s intelligence, according to a new report published in Perspectives on Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. (via Science Daily)

Controversy Over Parents Treating Severely Autistic Son with Medical Marijuana
An Oregon family has turned to medical marijuana to manage their son’s severe autistic rage, KPTV reported. Alex Echols, 11, is severely autistic, and his doctor said Alex’s self-destructive behavior is brought on by tuberous sclerosis, a rare, genetic disorder that affects about 50,000 people in the U.S. (via Fox News)

Schools Background Check Visitors In Illinois For Criminal Record
Visitors to schools in a suburban Chicago, Ill., district are now required to undergo a background check as part of added security measures in the weeks following last month’s shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Connecticut. (via Huffington Post)

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Teach Your Kids (And Yourself) What to Do if You’re in a Situation Like Sandy Hook

Tuesday, December 18th, 2012

One of the things that makes the tragedy at Sandy Hook Elementary even more horrifying to me is that the school seems to have done everything right—the building was locked and had a camera surveillance system, the teachers were well-trained in emergency procedures—but it still didn’t prevent Adam Lanza from getting in and killing 26 people.

Safety experts like Trevor Pyle, who has worked with many top disaster and emergency service agencies, stress that the tragedy could have been much worse. “The teachers and staff did the right thing, and their actions saved countless lives,” he told me in an interview.

There are certain behaviors that could make it more likely for you (and your child) to make it out of a situation like that alive—like six-year-old Aidan Licata and his friends, who ran when the opportunity presented itself, or one little girl, the only survivor from her classroom, who played dead. Here’s what Pyle suggests:

For kids:

• Tell them to listen to their teachers and school staff members. They receive extensive training on what to do and how to take care of the children. So tell them to recognize when the teacher is serious, and follow directions.

• Make sure that they pay attention during the drills, and know what to do when they are told to evacuate.

• Tell them to tell an adult if something appears to be “weird,” and that they aren’t going to get in trouble if they are wrong. Better to be safe than sorry. If they see something, make sure they say something.

For adults:

• Always know where at least two exits are. If you can, escape. If you can’t, hide. If you have to, fight with everything you have.

• If you can run, bring everyone you can with you. Get out of the building, and don’t stop until you find cover. Warn other people away from the building and call 911. Report your location. When cops arrive, keep your hands clear and don’t approach them. They aren’t there to rescue you, they are there to stop the shooter.

• If you have to hide, close and lock the door, turn out the lights, and mute your cell phone. Don’t move until the cops arrive.

• If you have to fight, improvise a weapon and attack. Target the shooter’s head, and torso. Do not hesitate, and don’t stop until he is down.

Hopefully, this is the kind of information you won’t ever have to use—but it may just save your life.

For more information and resources regarding the Sandy Hook Tragedy, visit the following on Parents.com:

Photo: © Vividz Foto/Shutterstock.com

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Monday, December 17th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

The Nation Heads Back to School With New Worries About Safety
Officials and parents spent the weekend anxious about how to talk to students about Friday’s shooting and how best to discourage something like it from happening again. (via New York Times)

‘I Am Adam Lanza’s Mother’: When Parents Are Afraid of Their Children
Following the Sandy Hook Elementary school shooting on Monday, one mother of a mentally ill boy stepped forward with an eloquent, wrenching cry for help that has echoed across the Web. In a blog post republished on the Blue Review titled “I Am Adam Lanza’s Mother,” Liza Long writes about living in fear of the son she loves. (via Time)

A New Leash on Infections: Dog that Sniffs Out a Deadly Superbug
Dutch doctors are training beagles’ famously sensitive sense of smell to sniff out Clostridium difficile, stubborn bacteria that cause severe, hard-to-treat diarrhea and sometimes life-threatening colitis. Cases of C. difficile have reached historical highs in recent years, claiming 14,000 lives in the U.S. each year, primarily in hospital or long-term care settings. (via Time)

Brain Imaging Identifies Bipolar Disorder Risk in Adolescents
Researchers from the Black Dog Institute and University of NSW have used brain imaging technology to show that young people with a known genetic risk of bipolar but no clinical signs of the condition have clear and quantifiable differences in brain activity when compared to controls. (via ScienceDaily)

Genetic Defect in Sex Cells May Predispose to Childhood Leukemia
Researchers at the Sainte-Justine University Hospital Center and the University of Montreal have found a possible heredity mechanism that predisposes children to acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common type of blood cancer in children. (via ScienceDaily)

Keep Thimerosal in Vaccines: Pediatricians
A mercury-containing preservative should not be banned as an ingredient in vaccines, U.S. pediatricians said Monday, in a move that may be controversial. (via Reuters)

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