Posts Tagged ‘ research ’

No Child Left Inside

Friday, May 24th, 2013

Should kids get an hour of gym every day? 

With physical activity as a proven brain booster, the Institute of Medicine is recommending that schools provide opportunities for at least 60 minutes of physical activity each day for students.

Since the passage of the No Child Left Behind law in 2001, 44 percent of school administrators report slashing big chunks of time from physical education, arts, and recess in order to boost classroom time for reading and math. Mandatory PE classes can help lower our nation’s childhood obesity rates, increase brain power, and add a healthy dose of fun to our kids’ school day, experts say.

A recent study by the Delaware Department of Education and the nonprofit Nemours Health & Prevention Services analyzed the records of more than 80,000 Delaware public-school students. It found that the kids who were more physically fit generally performed better on reading and math tests than their less-active peers.

Another study done by researchers at the University of Rome found that the test scores of 8-11 year olds improved by an average of 10 percent when they exercised right before an exam.

The Institute of Medicine recommends that PE be adopted as a core subject.

Do you think PE should be a core requirement?

Add a Comment

Parents Daily News Roundup

Friday, May 24th, 2013

Playground made from trash gets children back in the swing
Ruganzu Bruno and his troupe of fellow eco-artists created a playground made of recycled materials to raise awareness about environmental degradation. (via CNN)

Pregnancy Hormone May Predict Postpartum-Depression Risk
Levels of a stress hormone released by the placenta could predict a woman’s risk of developing postpartum depression, new research suggests. (via Yahoo! News)

NYC School Principals Send Letter Refusing To Consider Recent State Test In Fall Admissions
Principals around New York City are fighting back against what they see as flawed state tests. (via Huffington Post)

Report: Nation’s kids need to get more physical
The prestigious Institute of Medicine is recommending that schools provide opportunities for at least 60 minutes of physical activity each day for students and that PE become a core subject. (via Yahoo News)

Parents Argue School Is Violating Separation Of Church And State
Does teaching yoga in public schools violate the separation of church and state? That’s what two parents are contending in a lawsuit against Encinitas Union School District in California. (via Huffington Post)

Add a Comment

New Study: Two Types of Fathers in America

Friday, June 17th, 2011

A new study released by the Pew Research Center have found there are two dominant types of fathers in America: fathers who are actively involved in family life vs. fathers who are not because they live apart from the kids.

According to CNN.com, the Pew study found that today’s fathers are more active in their kids’ lives than 50 years ago, but fathers who live outside the household have also more than doubled since the 60s.  Those who live with their families are more in tune with their kids, with 93% talking to their kids a few times a week, over 50% transporting their kids to activities, and 9 out of 10 eating a few weekly meals together.

Education, income, and race are still factors that determine fatherhood – white fathers with higher education and incomes usually lived with their familes.  Only 21% lived apart.  Even though 44% of African-American fathers lived apart from the family, they were still the most active group of fathers who lived outside.

Another Pew survey revealed that 69% of the survey takers believe fathers living in the house contribute to a child’s happiness.  Not surprisingly, it’s important for fathers to be actively involved with their families, no matter if they’re living inside the house or not.

Add a Comment

Children with Self-Control May Become Successful Adults

Tuesday, February 1st, 2011

disciplineIf your 3-year-old shows remarkable self-control, congratulations: Your child will most likely become a successful adult.

A New Zealand study recently published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences involved scientists following 1,000 children from birth to adulthood.  The study analyzed the children’s “health, wealth, family and criminal status when the participants reached age 32, then looked for correlations between the self-control score and these outcomes, correcting, for I.Q. and socioeconomic status” (MSNBC.com)

The study revealed that children who displayed self-control at 3-years-old made less bad judgments when they were teens, such as smoking cigarettes, taking drugs, dropping out of school, and getting pregnant.  According to ScienceDaily, self-control was defined by factors such as a child’s threshold for tolerance, persistence in sticking with and executing goals, ability to think before acting, and patience in waiting.  Children who either learned or grew up teaching themselves discipline and self-control had a better future that didn’t include credit card debts, substance abuse, or low self-esteem. 

So instead of just natural intelligence, self-control can be important in propeling children to success.

Does your child have good self-control? What parenting tips do you have to help your kids to be more disciplined?

Add a Comment

Today Marks First National Amniotic Fluid Awareness Day

Thursday, January 27th, 2011

p_101657501While most women understand that amniotic fluid helps nourish and protect a growing baby in the womb, many are unaware of it’s benefits beyond pregnancy. Today’s launch of the very first National Amniotic Fluid Awareness Day aims to educate parents-to-be on the benefits involved in banking amniotic fluid during a pregnancy, according to Biocell Center, the leader in amniotic fluid preservation. While taking this precaution will cost you upwards of $1,000, research indicates that equipping a child with this option could very well protect him for life, explains Kate Torchilin, CEO of the center.

“The technology to preserve amniotic fluid did not exist until relatively recently so, for decades, doctors and labs have discarded what has proven to be one of the richest, natural sources of mesenchymal stem cells,” says Torchilin. “Amniotic fluid banking is the latest advance in stem cell preservation. Research with these stem cells is leading to significant medical discoveries, and the only way to take advantage is to plan ahead and preserve now.”

When collected and stored during a pregnancy (it’s done as part of an amniocentesis), research suggests amniotic fluid could eventually solve a great deal of medical issues that can arise during the course of  that child’s life and do things like as help repair cartilage, heal wounds or grow heart valves. Because amniotic fluid stem cells are a perfect match for a child, the organs and tissues that can be grown from these cells will always be accepted by his body. There is also the potential for  immediate family members to benefit should they be a match.

“It is easy and safe to collect amniotic fluid throughout the entire pregnancy, as early as the second trimester, because a little bit of it is already routinely collected during some prenatal tests”, says Torchilin. “A small amount – just one to a few teaspoonfuls – of fluid can be then set aside for preservation, without any change to the prenatal test itself.”

“Decisions about prenatal testing and stem cell banking can be overwhelming, so it is important for women who are pregnant or trying to conceiveto learn about all their options and be empowered to make the right decision for themselves and their family’s needs,” said Elizabeth Battaglino Cahill, RN, Executive Director of HealthyWomen, the leader in independent health information for women.  “We hope that stem cell banking becomes a routine consideration during pregnancy planning and that women become educated early on.”

For more information about Amniotic Fluid Awareness day or amniotic fluid banking, please visit http://www.biocellcenter.com or call 1-866-246-2720.

 Would you consider banking  your amniotic fluid? Share your thoughts!

Add a Comment

Pop Quiz: Is Testing Good for Kids?

Tuesday, October 19th, 2010

The next time your child asks why we need tests and quizzes, explain testing is like eating veggies—he may not love it, but it’ll be good for him!

A new research published in this month’s Science magazine explains students not only learn from testing, they also improve their memory. Simply studying without follow-up testing doesn’t help students retain necessary information.

Science magazine’s October issue focuses on a new research that tested undergraduates on their studying, memorizing, and testing abilities.   Students were given a list of Swahili words with English translations and asked to think of helpful ways to associate them.  The students were then divided into two groups—one group was left alone to study without tests while the other group was told to study and given a series of tests. 

At the end of the study, both groups were given a final test—the group that did better was the one given regular practice tests to help sharpen minds and memorization skills.  Quizzing students regularly helped them spend more time trying to understand difficult concepts.

Researchers hope this information can provide students with helpful studying tips.  So start encouraging kids to love (or at least tolerate) the benefits of studying!

Do you agree or disagree with this research?

Add a Comment