Posts Tagged ‘ radiation ’

Parents Daily News Roundup

Wednesday, May 9th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Targeting Child’s Play to Help Tackle Autism
As efforts expand to diagnose autism earlier and more accurately, researchers also are striving to figure out ways to treat children as young as one year old.

Concussion Crisis Growing in Girls’ Soccer
The number of girls suffering concussions in soccer accounts for the second largest amount of all concussions reported by young athletes, according to the American Journal of Sports Medicine.

FDA: Kids’ Medical Tests Need Child-Size Radiation
The government is taking steps to help ensure that children who need CT scans and other X-ray-based tests don’t get an adult-sized dose of radiation.

Bans on School Junk Food Pay Off in California
Five years after California started cracking down on junk food in school cafeterias, a new report shows that high school students there consume fewer calories and less fat and sugar at school than students in other states.

Kids Who Sleep in Parents’ Bed Less Likely to Be Overweight
Children who wake up at night and are allowed to fall back asleep in their parents’ bed are less likely to be overweight than kids put back into their own bed, a new study says.

Four Kids Rescued from Hood of Moving Car, Fort Wayne Police Say
Two people are in police custody after they allegedly strapped four children to the hood of a car and drove off after leaving a Fort Wayne liquor store, CBS affiliate WANE reported.

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Wednesday, December 7th, 2011

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Woman Seeking Food Stamps Shoots Her Children
A woman who for months was unable to qualify for food stamps pulled a gun in a state welfare office on Monday and staged a seven-hour standoff with the police that ended with her shooting her two children before killing herself, officials said.

Sugar Is on the Menu for Kids’ Breakfast
Only one in four children’s cereals meets government guidelines for limits on sugar, according to a new report by the Environmental Working Group, a consumer advocacy organization.

Radiation Traces Found in Japanese Baby Formula
Traces of radiation spilled from Japan’s hobbled nuclear plant were detected in baby formula Tuesday in the latest case of contaminated food in the nation.

Santa Finds Kids Giving Shorter Lists in Recession
With unemployment stubbornly high, more homes in foreclosure and the economic outlook dim, many children who visit Santa are all too aware of the struggle to make ends meet.

Steroids May Boost Survival for Very Preemie Babies
Giving steroids to pregnant women at risk for preterm birth as early as 23 weeks during their pregnancy may boost an infant’s overall chance of survival and reduce the baby’s risk of serious developmental issues, including brain injury, a new study says.

Students Gripe About School’s 5-Strikes Grammar Policy
Summit Christian Academy in Missouri has released a new policy, effective in January, stating that students will have to rewrite their papers if they have more than five grammatical errors. On the rewrite, however, they won’t be able to get anything higher than 75%.

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Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, June 14th, 2011

Goody Blog Daily News RoundupSmartphone danger: Distracted parenting
Still, I know my addiction to my hand-held device is bad. Checking my phone while talking to my kid while cooking dinner is hurting my capacity to stay with a thought for more than 140 characters.

Living with pets may protect infants from allergies
Children who live with dogs and cats are less likely to develop allergies to those animals later in life, but only if the pet is under the same roof while the child is still an infant, a new study suggests.

Japan city to give radiation counters to children
Japan’s Fukushima city said on Tuesday it would hand radiation dosimeters to 34,000 children to gauge their exposure from the crippled nuclear power plant about 60 kilometres (40 miles) away.

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Daily News Roundup

Thursday, March 31st, 2011

Who’s to blame? Girls fighting girls a growing trend
[Video] (MSNBC)

Breast-feeding feeds babies’ big brains, study suggests
Why some animals, like humans, have bigger brains than others has long puzzled scientists. Now a new study adds weight to the idea that such brainy brawn in mammals is determined by the amount of maternal investment.  (MSNBC)

Health Tip: Help Prevent Toddler Falls
The curious nature of young children pushes them to explore, but they may be unsteady on their feet, increasing the likelihood of falls. (Yahoo News)

Airport Security Scans: What would your doctor do?
I was in the security line at an airport a few months ago when I watched a fellow passenger do something I’d never seen done before: He dissed the scan. (CNN)

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Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, January 4th, 2011

Radiation Imaging Is Common in Children
The average child in the U.S. will have around seven medical imaging tests involving radiation by the time he or she reaches the age of 18, a new study suggests. (Web M.D.)

Traditional Care Of Late-Preterm Infants Detrimental To Child’s Health
In the last 15 years the U.S has seen a sharp increase in the number of babies born as late-preterm infants, between 34 and 37 weeks’ gestation. This is approximately 400,000 children each year, comprising over 70 percent of all preterm births. Often, late-preterm infants are treated the same as full-term infants since they are commonly a similar size and weight. Growing research is showing that this can be detrimental to a late-preterm infant’s health and frequently results in readmission to the hospital within the first month of life. (Medical News Today)

Interventions aimed at infants improve school readiness and achievement
Parent education programs delivered through pediatric primary care offices increased parent-child play and reading activities critical for child development and school readiness during infancy in at-risk families. (Medical Net.com)

VIP program appears to promote parent-child interactions in families with low socioeconomic status
Parent education programs delivered through pediatric primary care offices appeared to increase parent-child interactions during infancy in at-risk families. (Medical Net.com)
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