Posts Tagged ‘ preschool ’

Perfecting the Art of Potty Training?

Monday, January 31st, 2011

potty-training-toiletsShould a child be banned from preschool for having too many potty accidents?

At a preschool in Arlington, VA, a 3-year-old named Zoe was recently suspended for failing to comply with the school’s potty training policy.  Even though Zoe had already been potty trained, the new preschool schedule changed Zoe’s potty dynamics.  Since she began having too many accidents in a short amount of time at preschool, she was reproached by the school and asked to leave for one month. Eventually, her mom found another preschool (one without a potty training policy) willing to enroll Zoe, and she has not had any accidents since starting her new preschool.

News about this suspension worries parents who are already feeling the pressure to speed up their children’s education from an early age, from enrolling toddlers in sports to getting preschoolers to read chapter books. Since some preschools now accept only students who will be less hands-on in the potty department, parents are feeling the need to potty train their kids even if they’re not ready for it. There is also a social stigma that if a child is falling behind in developing certain behavioral or language skills, the child is delaying his achievements.

However, as expert Elizabeth Page pointed out in The Washington Post, potty training is considered a motor skill that depends on a child’s own pace, much like other milestones such as walking, talking, and reading.  Adults shouldn’t force kids to potty train before they are ready or shame and embarass them if they aren’t progressing as fast as other children.  Potty training can take time and even those who are potty trained could still have accidents.  In short, children should be allowed to progress on their own terms to potty training success.

Get potty training tips on Parents.com:

As a parent, are you worried about potty training your child?  What potty training techniques and tips would you recommend?

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Watch: ‘My Princess Boy’ on the Today Show

Wednesday, January 5th, 2011

A few months ago, we shared a story about one mom’s decision to let her son wear a princess costume for Halloween.  The mom, Cheryl Kilodavis, wrote and self-published a book titled “My Princess Boy” about her young son’s love for tutus, sparkles, and pink.  Her book has since gained popularity and is now published by Simon & Schuster. 

Below is a clip from Monday’s segment of the ”Today Show” in New York City, where Cheryl and her son (Dyson, now 5-years-old) speak about the importance of acceptance, inclusion, and embracing every child’s uniqueness.  Plus, stay tuned for our own upcoming interview with Cheryl Kilodavis!

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-XBCLGDbhKg

More on “My Princess Boy”:

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Poll: Should Little Boys Dress Like Girls?

Wednesday, November 10th, 2010

kilodavis-princessboyA hot debate is brewing among parents and among our readers: Would you let your little boy dress in girls’ clothing?

Cheryl Kilodavis is the mother of a 4-year-old boy who loves wearing sparkly and pink dresses, skirts, tiaras, and jewelry.  She wrote and self-published a children’s picture book titled “My Princess Boy,” based on her son, to create a dialogue about traditional gender roles, acceptance of differences, and unique self-expression. Another mom named Sarah blogged about her son’s choice to wear a “female” Halloween costume

We heard from parents like you who commented on the Parents magazine Facebook page and on the Parents Community discussion board.  Here are some highlights from the ongoing debate:

As an educator with a master’s degree in education, a former preschool teacher of 7 years, and a mother to a toddler, it is perfectly normal for a child to play in a way that may not be classified as “gender appropriate.”  Children learn the most by playing with other children, especially in the early years…It is all part of their development. Pretend play is a good way for children to model behaviors they see in their world. - Tracy Seng Wren

I do not approve or encourage my son to dress like a girl or act effeminate. As a father, my role is to teach him the appropriate male gender roles.  I would have no problem with my son cooking, helping with household chores, etc. There is a big difference with that and a boy dressing up as a girl. - Jose Tadeo

What do you think? Take our poll below and read more comments after the jump. 

 

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Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, November 9th, 2010

Low blood levels of Vitamin D linked to chubbier kids, faster weight gain - Kids who are deficient in vitamin D accumulated fat around the waist and gained weight more rapidly than kids who got enough vitamin D, a new University of Michigan study suggests. [Science Daily]

Fearless children show less empathy, more aggression - Preschool-aged children who demonstrate fearless behavior also reveal less empathy and more aggression towards their peers. This has been shown in a new study that was carried out at the University of Haifa’s Faculty of Education. “The results of this study show that fearless behavior in children can be identified and is related to neurological and genetic predisposition. This type of behavior has less correlation at least in infancy with standards of educational processes or parenting practice,” says Dr. Inbal Kivenson-Baron, who carried out the study. [Medical News Today]

Breastfeeding moms don’t get less or worse sleep than moms who use formula, study finds - Breastfed infants are reported to awaken more often and to sleep less. But does that mean breastfeeding mothers get less sleep, too? Not necessarily, according to the study, “Infant Feeding Methods and Maternal Sleep and Daytime Functioning,” in the December issue of Pediatrics. [Medical News Today]

New research highlights importance of parent-child communication to combat obesity - As part of its proprietary survey program, Student ViewPOINT™, ARAMARK Education, a leading provider of school food and nutrition services, surveyed almost 40,000 middle school and high school students across the country. The research revealed that parent-child communication has a significant influence on the nutrition habits of children. [The Medical News]

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World’s Biggest Toddler Banned from School

Wednesday, October 20th, 2010

xiaohao-CEN-TheSun

Photo Credit: CEN/The Sun

What if your child was—literally—too big to attend school?

A 3-year-old boy in the Guangzhou region of southern China was  banned from the preschool he was attending for being a “health hazard” to other children.  Despite being named Xiao Hao (“xiao” means “small” in Mandarin Chinese), there is nothing small about the boy—he weighs a whopping 140 lbs., nearly five times more than the average preschooler, making him the tallest and heaviest kid in his class and in the world.

Xiao Hao’s parents were able to find another preschool willing to let their son attend.  They are also seeking medical help for their son to maintain good physical and heart health.  Some doctors believe Xiao Hao may have a growth hormone disorder that is causing him to increase at an unusual rate.  Others believe he is the sad result of “Little Emperor Syndrome,” when parents and relatives overindulge their kids as a result of China’s one-child policy.

Do you think it was right for the school to ban Xiao Hao?  Would you let your child attend school with him?

>> Take Our Quiz: Is Your Child at Risk for Becoming Overweight?

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