Posts Tagged ‘ preemies ’

Parents Daily News Roundup

Monday, April 15th, 2013

Lullabies and other music may help sick preemies
Singing or playing womb-like sounds in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) may help slow the heart rate and improve sleep and eating patterns of premature babies, a new study suggests. (via Reuters)

Children, Ages 5 And 7, Drown In L.I. Pool
A 5-year-old boy and a 7-year-old girl drowned Sunday afternoon in a backyard pool in Suffolk County. (via CBS News)

Education Reform: Starting at the Beginning
School officials in Atlanta have been accused of racketeering for cheating on tests in order to gain bonus pay and status for their schools. (via Huffington Post)

Sexist ‘Avengers’ T Shirts Tell Boys To Be Heroes And Girls To Need A Hero
Marvel, the comic book publisher, is now contributing to the boys are strong/girls are weak dichotomy with two t-shirts based on the popular “Avengers” franchise. (via Huffington Post)

People, networks may sway parents’ vaccine choices
The people and information sources parents surround themselves with may influence their choice to vaccinate their children or not, according to a survey from one county in Washington state. via Reuters

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World Prematurity Day in the NICU

Monday, November 19th, 2012

This post is written by Dana Points, editor in chief of Parents.

Watching a nurse change what must surely be the world’s smallest diaper will do more to motivate you to want to prevent prematurity than reading troubling statistics about early birth. Nevertheless, I’ll share some: Worldwide, 15 million babies are born preterm each year. 1.1 million die and many others are disabled. The rate of preterm birth in the U.S. has dropped over the last five years, but we still have the highest rate of any industrialized country.

I saw the diaper change–and incubator after incubator holding the tiniest babies, often attached to ventilators and monitors–during a visit to the neonatal intensive care unit at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital, which is affiliated with Stanford University School of Medicine. There, the March of Dimes has funded a unique research center where scientists from across a wide array of specialties are examining the causes of prematurity in hopes of finding cures. (I had the opportunity to make the visit because I am a March of Dimes trustee.)

Researchers are looking at the role microorganisms that live in our digestive tract, on our skin and elsewhere in the body play in prematurity; at the connections between genes and the environment; and at the way data can be used to examine why some hospitals have higher rates of early births and what doctors can do to bring down the numbers. Here at Parents we have “bagel Wednesdays” when our staff shares breakfast and conversation. But at the MOD’s Prematurity Research Center they have “preterm Wednesdays” where scientists share findings and ideas. Pretty humbling to think about the difference.

The scientists and the babies are heroic here, but so are the California moms-to-be and moms who are participating in the center’s research by giving weekly samples scraped from their gums and skin, as well as urine and blood samples, which scientists are using to help identify possible causes of prematurity. The lab’s giant freezers are crowded with 10,000 samples. The vials arrive in thermal lunch bags like the kind my kids use. These are bright red so as not to be confused with…lunch (photo to the right).

The goal of the Prematurity Research Center is essentially to put the NICU out of business, and the doctors who spend their days treating these babies say their top priority is prevention. Until that goal is achieved, we’ll keep World Prematurity Day on the calendar as a reminder so the tiniest babies won’t be forgotten.

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Friday, October 12th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Exposure to Traffic Air Pollution in Infancy Impairs Lung Function in Children
Exposure to ambient air pollution from traffic during infancy is associated with lung function deficits in children up to eight years of age, particularly among children sensitized to common allergens, according to a new study. (via Science Daily)

Drug Shortage Led to Spike in Kids’ Infections
When there was a shortage of a drug used to prevent IV-related infections in kids, the frequency of those infections increased almost ten-fold at one hospital, a new study shows. (via NBC News)

No Clear Link Between Organic Food, Birth Defect
Baby boys whose moms ate organic during pregnancy do not seem to have a lower risk of a birth defect of the penis, a new study finds. (via Reuters)

Preemies from Low-Income Families at High Risk for Dangerous Brain Bleeds
Babies born prematurely to low-income parents have a disproportionately high risk for developing dangerous brain bleeds that require multiple surgeries and extensive follow-up, according to a new study. (via Science Daily)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Monday, October 8th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Nearly Half of Children With Autism Wander From Safety: Survey
Nearly half of children with autism wander or “elope” from safety — often to pursue a special interest or goal — with more than half of those kids disappearing long enough to cause great concern about their well-being, new research suggests. (via U.S. News and World Report)

Certain Eye Injuries in Kids May Indicate Child Abuse: Study
Physicians can use eye examinations to figure out whether infant and toddler head injuries were caused by accidental injury or child abuse, suggests a new study that adds to existing evidence on this method of detecting abuse. (via U.S. News and World Report)

Case Count Rises to 91 in Fungal Meningitis Outbreak
At least 91 people have been infected with an unusual type of meningitis caused by contaminated steroid injections, federal health officials said Sunday, with seven deaths. (via NBC News)

Fresh Blood Not Better for Transfusions for Premature Infants, Clinical Trial Shows
In a finding that runs counter to commonly held beliefs about fresh being better, a clinical trial shows that acutely ill premature babies who received fresher blood did not fare better than those who received the current standard of care. (via Science Daily)

Rare Program Allows Arrested Moms to Stay Home with Their Children
A New York program allows arrested mothers to live with their children in a private apartment instead of prison while they serve out court mandates. (via Fox News)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, July 5th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Mother’s Blood Shows Birth Defects in Fetal DNA
Researchers said they were able to sequence the entire genome of a fetus using only a blood sample from the mother, an advance in the effort to find noninvasive ways for expectant parents to determine if their babies will be born with genetic conditions. (via Fox News)

Smoking Mothers’ Embryos ‘Grow More Slowly’
French academics in an IVF clinic took regular pictures of an egg from the moment it was fertilized until it was ready to be implanted into the mother. At all stages of development, embryos from smokers were consistently a couple of hours behind, a study showed. (via BBC News)

Too Much Coffee Could Hurt Women’s Chances of IVF Success
Women who drank five or more cups of coffee a day were about 50% less likely to get pregnant through in-vitro fertilization than non-drinkers, according to a recent Danish study. The authors noted it was “comparable to the detrimental effect of smoking.” (via TIME)

Company Studying OxyContin’s Effect in Children
The maker of the prescription painkiller OxyContin confirms that a clinical trial is currently underway to measure the opioid’s effects in children. Although doctors can prescribe OxyContin off-label to pediatric patients, the drug — which was overwhelmingly tested in adults — is not approved for use in children by the Food and Drug Administration. (via CNN)

Premature Birth May Raise Risk for Mental Illness, Study Reports
Young adults born very premature — at less than 32 weeks’ gestation — were more than twice as likely to be hospitalized for schizophrenia or delusional disorders, almost three times as likely for major depression, and more than seven times as likely for bipolar illness. (via NY Times)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Monday, July 2nd, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

As Crops Rot, Millions Go Hungry in India
Every day some 3,000 Indian children die from illnesses related to malnutrition, and yet countless heaps of rodent-infested wheat and rice are rotting in fields across the north of their own country. (via Reuters)

Slightly Early Birth May Hurt Baby’s Academic Performance
Kids who get too early a start at life – even if they are born in the first half of the gestation period associated with “normal term” birth – appear more likely to struggle at reading and math by the time they reach third grade, new research suggest. (via ABC News)

Hitting Your Kids Increases their Risk of Mental Illness
A new study in Pediatrics finds that harsh physical punishment increases the risk of mental disorders — even when the punishment doesn’t stoop to the level of actual abuse. People who experienced physical punishment were more likely to experience nearly every type of mental illness examined. (via TIME)

California Bill Would Let Children Have More than Two Parents
When adults fight over parenthood, a judge must decide which two have that right and responsibility – but that could end soon. California State Sen. Mark Leno is pushing legislation to allow a child to have multiple parents. (via The Sacramento Bee)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Monday, June 4th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Premature Babies Have Higher Mental Illness Risk
Babies born prematurely have a much higher risk of developing severe mental disorders including psychosis, bipolar disorder and depression, according to a study to be published on Monday.

FDA Warns About Benzocaine in Baby Pain Gels
A new consumer update released by the Food and Drug Administration says babies and benzocaine–an ingredient found in many over the counter pain gels and liquids–don’t mix.

Facebook Mulls Letting Kids Under 13 Aboard
Facebook’s 13-and-up age cut-off could soon be a thing of the past.

Most New Moms Don’t Meet Own Breastfeeding Goals
Two thirds of new mothers who intended to breastfeed exclusively for several months or more didn’t meet their own goals in a new study.

Obama Writes Note to Excuse Boy from School
When a Minnesota fifth-grader skipped school to see his father introduce President Obama at a campaign event, he received the excuse note of a lifetime, personally written by the president himself.

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Friday, May 25th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

More Kids Eating Detergent Packs, Docs Report
Miniature laundry detergent packets arrived on store shelves in recent months as an alternative to bulky bottles and messy spills. But doctors across the country say children are confusing the tiny, brightly colored packets with candy and swallowing them.

Childhood Cancer Effects May Linger in Adults
Survivors of childhood cancers have an increased risk of disfigurement and persistent hair loss later in life, and for some that may lead to long-term emotional distress, suggests a new study.

Study Links Obesity to C-Section Births
Elizabeth Cohen discusses a study linking babies born via C-section to obesity.

Supreme Court Rules Against Benefits for Posthumously Conceived Kids
Karen Capato used her deceased husband’s frozen sperm to conceive twins. The Supreme Court has ruled the kids aren’t eligible for federal benefits because of their posthumous conception.

9-Ounce Newborn May Leave the Hospital
Kenna Moore was born at a wee nine ounces, perhaps one of the smallest babies in the world to survive.

School Plans Condom Giveaway for Prom
Bedford-Stuyvesant Preparatory High School in Brooklyn, N.Y. will make 500 condoms available at the school’s June 7 prom.

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