Posts Tagged ‘ Parents Daily News Roundup ’

Parents Daily News Roundup

Wednesday, May 1st, 2013

Public School in Queens Adopts All-Vegetarian Menu, Becomes the First in NYC To Do So
A New York City elementary school has adopted an all-vegetarian menu, serving kids tofu wraps and veggie chili. Public School 244 is the first public school in the city to go all-veggie. The animal-welfare group People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals says it might be the first all-veggie public elementary school in the nation. (via Huffington Post)

Newtown Educators To Be Honored By Medal Of Honor Society
The Congressional Medal of Honor Society plans to honor the six educators killed in the December massacre at the Sandy Hook Elementary School in Connecticut with its highest civilian award. (via Huffington Post)

Researchers Successfully Treat Autism in Infants: Playing Games That Infants Prefer Can Lessen Severity of Symptoms
Most infants respond to a game of peek-a-boo with smiles at the very least, and, for those who find the activity particularly entertaining, gales of laughter. For infants with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), however, the game can be distressing rather than pleasant, and they’ll do their best to tune out all aspects of it — and that includes the people playing with them. (via Science Daily)

Twins Delivered 87 Days Apart
A woman in Ireland gave birth to twins 87 days apart, The Belfast Telegraph reported.
Dr. Eddie O’Donnell, a consultant obstetrician, said this birth was “probably the first of its kind” in Irish medical history and described the event as “extremely unusual.” (via Fox News)

NICU Treatments Linked to Intellectual Disabilities
Neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) interventions for babies born very small and early have drastically reduced infant deaths in the United States, but in doing so they’ve contributed to more intellectual disabilities, according to a new study. (via Reuters)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, April 11th, 2013

Preschool For All Plan in Obama Budget May Skip Some States
President Barack Obama’s “Preschool for All” initiative in his 2014 budget proposal is billed as a way to make sure every American child can attend preschool for free. Helping kids in their early years can ease achievement gaps and help them enter the workforce later on, the administration said. “This would constitute the largest expansion of educational opportunity in the 21st century,” Secretary of Education Arne Duncan said on a Wednesday call with reporters. (via Huffington Post)

Young Children Have Grammar and Chimpanzees Don’t
A new study from the University of Pennsylvania has shown that children as young as 2 understand basic grammar rules when they first learn to speak and are not simply imitating adults. The study also applied the same statistical analysis on data from one of the most famous animal language-acquisition experiments — Project Nim — and showed that Nim Chimpsky, a chimpanzee who was taught sign language over the course of many years, never grasped rules like those in a 2-year-old’s grammar. (via Science Daily)

Study Finds No Fertility Drug, Ovarian Cancer Link
Despite lingering concerns that using fertility drugs might raise a woman’s chances for later developing ovarian cancer, new research suggests the drugs don’t contribute any added risk. “One important message is women who need to use fertility drugs to get pregnant should not worry about using these fertility drugs,” said Dr. Albert Asante, lead author of the study and a clinical fellow in the division of reproductive endocrinology at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. (via Reuters)

How Childhood Hunger Can Change Adult Personality
The effects of going hungry in childhood may be more lasting than previously thought. Researchers studying people raised on Barbados who suffered severe starvation as infants found these adults were more anxious, less sociable, less interested in new experiences and more hostile than those who were well-nourished throughout childhood, according to a study published in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry. (via TIME)

Car Exhaust Linked to Childhood Cancers, Study Finds
Scientific experts have reams of data to show that the nation faces an epidemic of illnesses that are exacerbated by vehicle exhaust. These illnesses include cardiovascular disease, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), lung cancer and diabetes. The latest study, presented on April 8, 2013 at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) 2013 Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C., showed a possible link between exposure to traffic-related air pollution and several childhood cancers. (via Fox News)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Wednesday, April 10th, 2013

Month of Birth Impacts Immune System Development
Newborn babies’ immune system development and levels of vitamin D have been found to vary according to their month of birth, according to new research. (via Science Daily)

Obama Pre-K Expansion Battle Pits Kids Against Cigarettes
President Barack Obama’s 2014 budget pits education activists against the tobacco industry by proposing to help fund a new early childhood education program with a tax hike on tobacco. (via Huffington Post)

Breakfast Cereal Tied to Lower BMI for Kids
Regularly eating cereal for breakfast is tied to healthy weight for kids, according to a new study that endorses making breakfast cereal accessible to low-income kids to help fight childhood obesity. (via Reuters)

Babies of Blind Moms Excel in Vision Tests
Babies born to blind mothers have better visual attention and memory than their counterparts with seeing parents, new research suggests. The findings, published April 9 in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B, suggest that blind parents’ inability to respond to gaze and eye contact doesn’t harm their babies’ development. (via Fox News)

Michelle Obama Harper High School: First Lady to Visit Chicago School Impacted by Violence
First lady Michelle Obama is heading to Chicago to address a conference on gun violence and speak with students at a high school deeply affected by the bloodshed. With Congress poised to begin debate Thursday on firearms restrictions, the White House is mounting a vigorous push for action this week. (via Huffington Post)

British “Test Tube Baby” Pioneer Robert Edwards Dies
Robert Edwards, a British Nobel prize-winning scientist known as the father of in-vitro fertilization (IVF) for pioneering the development of “test tube babies”, died on Wednesday aged 87 after a long illness, his university said. Edwards, who won the Nobel prize for medicine in 2010, started work on fertilization in the 1950s, and the first so-called test tube baby, Louise Brown, was born in 1978 as a result of his research. (via Reuters)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, March 28th, 2013

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Most Restaurant Kids’ Meals Packed With Calories
Most kids’ meals at the USA’s top chain restaurants are still failing to make the grade when it comes to good nutrition, a new analysis finds. (via USA Today)

Genetic Variants and Wheezing Put Kids At Risk For Asthma
Almost every toddler will sniffle through a cold by the time they are three, but if they wheeze while they’re sick, they may be at higher risk of developing asthma. (via TIME)

Quality Preschool Benefits Poor and Affluent Kids, Study Finds
Quality prekindergarten programs can boost children’s school skills whether the kids come from poor or well-off homes, a new study shows. (via NBC News)

Bulletproof Backpacks for Kids: Cautious Protection or Feeding Anxiety?
A wave of parents are willing to try the extreme and controversial measure of making their children wear bulletproof materials to protect them at school in the wake of the shooting in Newtown, Conn., and other school shootings. But gun control advocates see this as a disturbing sign of how willing we have become to accept gun violence as the norm. (via ABC News)

Warren Buffett On Teaching Kids Smart Investing, With Cartoons
Kids will learn practical and valuable lessons about money management and can easily relate to the easy-going and fun, animated series. (via Forbes)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Wednesday, March 27th, 2013

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Chicago School Closings Provoke Parents’ Confusion, Anger
Nanette Fouch does not understand why her granddaughter may have to transfer from a Chicago elementary school earmarked to close partly because of poor academics to one where students scored even lower on a recent standardized test. (via Huffington Post)

Violent Video Games are a Risk Factor for Criminal Behavior and Aggression, New Evidence Shows
People are quick to point the finger or dismiss the effect of violent video games as a factor in criminal behavior. New evidence from Iowa State researchers demonstrates a link between video games and youth violence and delinquency. (via ScienceDaily)

A High School Where the Students are the Teachers
If high school students took charge of their education with limited supervision, would they learn? A Massachusetts school is finding out. (via TIME)

Study Clarifies Link Between Fertility Treatments and Neurological Problems in Kids
Children born from in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatments have shown a higher risk of developmental problems, but what is responsible for the heightened risk? (via TIME)

Albany Moves to End Standoff in New York City Over Teachers Evaluations
Amid rising concerns about the promotion and consumption of energy drinks, researchers released new data Thursday suggesting energy drinks may negatively affect heart rhythm and blood pressure. (via The New York Times)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, March 26th, 2013

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Math Skills: What Scientists Can Teach Parents about Kids’ Developing Minds
We know a lot about how babies learn to talk, and youngsters learn to read. Now scientists are unraveling the earliest building blocks of math – and what children know about numbers as they begin first grade seems to play a big role in how well they do everyday calculations later on. (via Huffington Post)

Arguments in the Home Linked with Babies’ Brain Functioning
Being exposed to arguments between parents is associated with the way babies’ brains process emotional tone of voice, according to a new study to be published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. (via Science Daily)

Traffic Congestion Causes Childhood Asthma, Study Confirms
For the first time, European researchers have confirmed poor air quality due to congested road traffic is linked to kids’ asthma, the Los Angeles Times reported. A study, published online in the European Respiratory Journal, found 14 percent of childhood asthma cases were attributed to nearby traffic pollution, according to the newspaper. (via Fox News)

North Dakota Governor Approves 6-Week Abortion Ban
North Dakota Gov. Jack Dalrymple has signed legislation that would ban most abortions if a fetal heartbeat can be detected, something that can happen as early as six weeks into a pregnancy. (via Associated Press)

Debate on School Security Ramps Up
Hoping to head off a push to expand police presence in the nation’s 100,000 public schools, a national civil rights group plans to issue an alternative this week to beefing up school security. The plan focuses on counselors, campus safety teams, secure entrances and communication. It does not support adding more armed police. (via The Washington Post)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Monday, March 25th, 2013

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

CDC: 105 Children Died During Flu Season in US
Health officials say the flu season is winding down, and it has killed 105 children — about the average toll. The flu season started earlier than usual and ended up being moderately severe. (via FOX News)

Babies Shouldn’t Get Solid Foods Until 6 Months Old
A new study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found many mothers are feeding babies solid foods earlier than the recommended age of six months, according to the Cleveland Clinic. (via FOX News)

Kids Who Exercise Are Less Likely to Have Fractures in Old Age
It turns out that strengthening bone to avoid fractures starts at a very young age.
Physical activity, such as the exercise children get in school gym classes, is important for fighting obesity, but the latest research suggests it may help to keep bones strong as well. (via TIME)

Celebrity Endorsers May Impact How Much Kids Eat
Celebrities who endorse specific foods in TV commercials are a powerful influence on children, and that effect may extend beyond the advertisement itself, according to a new study from the UK.(via Reuters)

Some Schools Urge Students to Bring Their Own Technology
Educators and policy makers continue to debate whether computers are a good teaching tool. But a growing number of schools are adopting a new, even more controversial approach: asking students to bring their own smartphones, tablets, laptops and even their video game players to class. (via The New York Times)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Friday, March 22nd, 2013

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Chicago School Closings: District Plans To Shutter 54 Schools
Citing budget concerns and falling enrollment, Chicago Public Schools officials announced Thursday they plan to close 54 schools next year and shut down 61 school buildings — the largest single wave of school closures in U.S. history. (via Huffington Post)

Camera Found In Maryland High School Bathroom Was Put There By Anne Arundel County Police Officer, Say Officials
An Anne Arundel County police officer has been placed on administrative leave after an investigation indicated he placed a camera in a boys bathroom at Glen Burnie High School, police said Thursday. (via Huffington Post)

Misregulated Genes May Have Big Autism Role
A new study finds that two genes individually associated with rare autism-related disorders are also jointly linked to more general forms of autism. The finding suggests a new genetic pathway to investigate in general autism research. (via Science Daily)

Antibiotics Not Worth Risk in Most Chest Colds: Study
Doctors need to give antibiotics to more than 12,000 people with acute respiratory infections to prevent just one of them from being hospitalized with pneumonia, according to a new study. (via Reuters)

Toddler Meals Have Too Much Salt, CDC Reports
Most ready-to-eat meals for toddlers have too much salt, government researchers say. (via Fox News)

Energy Drinks Linked With Heart Problems
Amid rising concerns about the promotion and consumption of energy drinks, researchers released new data Thursday suggesting energy drinks may negatively affect heart rhythm and blood pressure. (via Fox News)

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