Posts Tagged ‘ obesity ’

Parents Daily News Roundup

Monday, January 7th, 2013

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Obesity Declining in Young, Poorer Kids: Study
The number of low-income preschoolers who qualify as obese or “extremely obese” has dropped over the last decade, new data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show. (via Reuters)

Video Games Fail to Stoke Kids’ Appetite for Fruit
Healthy food advertising in the form of online games doesn’t make kids crave more wholesome snacks, according to a new study from the Netherlands. (via Reuters)

Farewell to Aspies: Some Families Reluctant to Let Go of Asperger’s Diagnosis
The news that the term “Asperger’s syndrome” will soon cease to exist has some parents concerned – especially parents raising “Aspie” children. (via Today)

City Prepares for a Strike, Maybe This Week, by School Bus Drivers
The possibility of a strike by New York City’s school bus drivers inched closer on Sunday, with the schools chancellor, Dennis M. Walcott, detailing contingency plans for the 152,000 public and private students who could be affected, as, steps away, hundreds of bus drivers, union leaders and parents noisily protested the loss of job security in new contracts. (via New York Times)

11 States Get Failing Grades on Public School Policies From Advocacy Group
In just a few short years, state legislatures and education agencies across the country have sought to transform American public education by passing a series of laws and policies overhauling teacher tenure, introducing the use of standardized test scores in performance evaluations and expanding charter schools. (via New York Times)

Jeremiah, High School Junior, Creates Social Accounts To Spread Compliments At School
To combat bullying and boost positivity at his school, one student is going online and posting compliments on Twitter about many of his classmates. His account, @westhighbros, has tweeted over 3,000 nice messages since it launched in October 2011. (via Huffington Post)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Wednesday, December 26th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Nearly One in Three Children With Food Allergies Experience Bullying, Survey Shows
Nearly a third of children diagnosed with food allergies who participated in a recent study are bullied, according to researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Almost eight percent of children in the U.S. are allergic to foods such as peanuts, tree-nuts, milk, eggs, and shellfish. (via ScienceDaily)

Obesity Declining in Young, Poorer Kids: Study
The number of low-income preschoolers who qualify as obese or “extremely obese” has dropped over the last decade, new data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show. (via Reuters)

Four Typical Holiday Money Fights–And How to Avoid Them
Fights about money are already the most common source of discord among American couples throughout the year, triggering an average of three arguments per month according to a recent study by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AIPCA). Add some financial pressure to the holiday mix, and the good cheer can quickly turn to bickering. (via Time)

Gene Variants Affect Pain Susceptibility in Children
At least two common gene variants are linked to “clinically meaningful” differences in pain scores in children after major surgery, reports a study in the January issue of Anesthesia & Analgesia, official journal of the International Anesthesia Research Society (IARS). (via ScienceDaily)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Wednesday, December 19th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Bullying by Childhood Peers Leaves a Trace That Can Change the Expression of a Gene Linked to Mood
A recent study by a researcher at the Centre for Studies on Human Stress (CSHS) at the Hôpital Louis-H. Lafontaine and professor at the Université de Montréal suggests that bullying by peers changes the structure surrounding a gene involved in regulating mood, making victims more vulnerable to mental health problems as they age. (via ScienceDaily)

School Officials Look Again at Security Measures Once Dismissed
Now, in the wake of the massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary in Connecticut, school officials across the nation are reviewing security protocols, including lockdown drills and building entry procedures, but also whether to hire more armed guards. (via New York Times)

Global Rates of Infertility Remain Unchanged Over Past 2 Decades
In 2010, almost 50 million couples worldwide were unable to have a child after five years of trying. Infertility rates have hardly changed over the past 20 years, according to a study by international researchers published in this week’s PLOS Medicine. (via ScienceDaily)

Muscle-Loss Study Sheds New Light On Ways to Prevent Muscle Loss, Obesity and Diabetes
A research study from Nanyang Technological University (NTU) has yielded important breakthroughs on how the body loses muscle, paving the way for new treatments for aging, obesity and diabetes. (via ScienceDaily)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, December 11th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

U.S. Students Still Lag Globally in Math and Science, Tests Show
Fourth- and eighth-grade students in the United States continue to lag behind students in several East Asian countries and some European nations in math and science, although American fourth graders are closer to the top performers in reading, according to test results released on Tuesday. (via New York Times)

Obesity in Young Is Seen as Falling in Several Cities
After decades of rising childhood obesity rates, several American cities are reporting their first declines. The trend has emerged in big cities like New York and Los Angeles, as well as smaller places like Anchorage, Alaska, and Kearney, Neb. The state of Mississippi has also registered a drop, but only among white students. (via New York Times)

Vermont Tops Lists of Healthiest States
The annual America’s Health Rankings list is out, pitting U.S. states against each other in a no-holds-barred contest of health. For the fourth year in a row, Vermont takes the top spot as healthiest state. How did your state fare? (via ABC Health)

Overeating in Children may be Linked to Drug Use
Do bad nutrition habits like overeating or binge eating lead to smoking pot? Some health experts think they might, according to a study published Monday. (via CNN Health)

D Is for Divorce: Sesame Street Tackles Another Touchy Topic
In early 1992, a census report predicted that 40% of children would soon live in divorced homes. As one of the most famous children’s-television programs in the world, Sesame Street was determined to take on a topic most kids shows wouldn’t touch. (via Time)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, November 29th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Pregnant Women Most Vulnerable to Flu
The World Health Organization says pregnant women should be given top priority for flu vaccinations this season, putting them above the elderly, children, and people with chronic health conditions. (via ABC News)

Predicting Obesity at Birth
Researchers say they have a formula for divining which newborns are at the highest risk of becoming obese during childhood. (via Time)

For Children, a Lie on Facebook Has Consequences, Study Finds
A federal law intended to protect children’s privacy may unwittingly lead them to reveal too much on Facebook, a provocative new academic study shows. (via New York Times)

Experts Call for Mental Illness Screening for Children
Leading mental health experts are calling for school children to be screened for risk of mental illnesses such as depression and have devised a test that reliably identifies those at high risk. (via MSNBC)

Online Tool Creates Catch-Up Immunization Schedules
A new online tool takes the guesswork out of developing individualized catch-up immunization schedules by allowing parents and health care providers to easily create a schedule that ensures missed vaccines and future vaccines are administered according to approved guidelines. (via ScienceDaily)

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School Lunches That Make the Grade

Friday, October 26th, 2012

My elementary school didn’t have a cafeteria, but every Tuesday was pizza day. Drooling students lined up in the hallway clutching dollar bills to pay for a piping-hot pepperoni slice and a little carton of milk. I looked forward to it all week.

Luckily, pizza day was only once per week, and my other four lunches were comprised of healthy sliced fruits, veggies, and sandwiches on whole-grain bread (thanks, Mom). But these days, kids are eating in school more often—and that may mean that they’re gorging on fat-packed foods daily. We discussed the problem of unhealthy school lunches in this article from our September 2010 issue. These unhealthy meals have serious long-term effects—check out our recent story on the childhood obesity crisis. The National School Lunch Program dishes out 31 million lunches per day. This school year, the NSLP’s nutrition standards were updated in accordance with the latest Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Lunches have an age-based calorie cap, and schools are required to limit sodium and saturated fat and serve more fruits, veggies, and whole-grain items. But are they measuring up?

Last week, the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine released its eighth School Lunch Report Card evaluating meals served by the National School Lunch Program. Standout schools received high grades for offering veggie-packed side dishes, vegetarian and dairy/egg-free entrée options, and nondairy beverages. (The valedictorian: Pinellas County Schools in Florida, which earned a perfect score.) Schools also garnered points for implementing nutrition education in the cafeteria. Failing grades were assigned to schools that dole out cholesterol-heavy dairy products and processed meats such as hotdogs and pepperoni. Low-scoring districts in Houston and Milwaukee were criticized for serving meals such as chicken-fried steak fingers and breaded catfish.

The good news: healthy lunch options are on the rise. The average grade is a B (84%), up 5% from 2008. Healthier lunch options can help decrease students’ lifetime risk of developing obesity, type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and colorectal cancers.

Looking for healthy meals you can stash in your kid’s lunchbox? We’ve got tons of creative ideas to please even the pickiest eaters.

Read the full report here, and tell us how your kid’s school compares.

Image: School lunch via Shutterstock.

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, September 20th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

The First Drug that Could Ease Social Withdrawal in Autism
An experimental drug that helps people with Fragile X syndrome showed promising results for a treatment for autism. (via Time)

Weight and Taste Sensitivity Are Linked, New Study Says
Obese children have less sensitive taste buds than kids of normal weight, and that may drive them to eat more. (via ABC News)

Study Finds Concerning Levels of Arsenic in Rice
After testing more than 200 samples of rice products, researchers found measurable amounts of arsenic in almost every single one. (via CBS News)

Cancers on the Rise in Pregnant Women
The number of pregnant women diagnosed with cancer has increased over the past few decades, likely due to the older age of expectant mothers and better detection methods. (via Reuters)

Report: Kids Should Only Eat Tuna Once a Month
New research suggests that kids should only eat light tuna once or twice a month to keep their mercury intake at a safe level. (via CNN)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, September 18th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

U.S. Study Links the Chemical BPA to Obesity in Children
Children with higher levels of BPA are more likely to be obese. The chemical can throw off young people’s hormone balance and disrupt their metabolism. (via Reuters)

“Sexting” Again Linked to Risky Sex Among Teens: Study
Teens who “sext” are more likely to engage in risky sexual behavior, according to research. (via Reuters)

High School Students Boycott School Cafeteria Over New Lunch Restrictions
Wisconsin students are boycotting their school’s new low-calorie food restrictions. (via Fox News)

School District Bans Father-Daughter Dances
A Rhode Island school district has banned “father-daughter” and “mother-son” activities as discriminatory. (via USA Today)

Doctors Perform Emergency Surgery to Remove Girl’s Tongue Stuck in Bottle
After getting her tongue stuck in a water bottle, an 8-year-old Georgia girl spent one hour in emergency surgery to have the bottle removed. Her mother says she will likely need speech therapy because of the damage she suffered. (via Fox News)

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