Posts Tagged ‘ natural ’

Safe Body and Skin Care Products for Kids

Tuesday, January 14th, 2014

It’s scary to think of all the harsh chemicals we ingest daily during harmless activities. Until recently, I didn’t even know that the shampoos, soaps, and cosmetics I was using contained ingredients that were actually dangerous for my health. Many moms are deciding not to take their chances and are instead switching to products made with natural, organic, and easy-to-pronounce ingredients for themselves and their little ones.

Gregg Renfrew, founder of Beautycounter, is one of these moms. After noticing a lack of safe yet stylish products on the market, Renfrew created the body and skin care line, which launched last spring. Renfrew’s Beautycounter products, such as the Everyday Shampoo and Conditioner, are vegan, gluten-free, and made without harmful petrochemicals. Bonus: they come in sleek, sophisticated packaging so you can feel good about replacing some of your old favorites on your vanity.

Of course, parents and their children appreciate different styles and tastes, so with that in mind, Renfrew has decided to extend Beautycounter to create Kidscounter. The line, which launched with its Bath Collection in November, is made with the same healthy goal in mind but with a kid-friendlier approach. The first three products of the kids’ line are the colorful and fruit-scented Nice Do Shampoo, Not a Knot Conditioner, and Squeaky Clean Body Wash, retailing for $16 each.

All of the Beautycounter and Kidscounter products are available for purchase at beautycounter.com or through a local Beautycounter consultant.

Image courtesy of Beautycounter

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Dip-Dye Design

Monday, November 18th, 2013

DIY crafter Alison Caporimo recently released her first book, Instacraft, about fun and simple projects for adorable gifts and décor. We received permission to showcase four crafts from the book on Goodyblog. Come back each Monday (11/4, 11/11, 11/18, 11/25) to see which creations we feature next.

 

Berry Stationery

“Have left over blueberries in the fridge? Let’s make something of them!” Alison says.

Materials:
3 cups water
1 cup blueberries
Stockpot
Card stock

Directions:
1. Pour water into a pot and heat over a high flame until boiling.
2. Stir in blueberries and smash with a spoon or potato masher. Mix well and allow to cool slightly until lukewarm.
3. Dip card stock into dyed water and allow to dry completely before using. (Experiment with dipping times and angles.)

 

Alison’s extra tips for Parents readers:

  • Swap it: Instead of blueberries, try beets, blackberries, tea, or turmeric spice.
  • Challenge your kids to count and measure the ingredients before you get started.
  • Explore and investigate! The color of your dye is true to what it looks like in the pot, so experiment with your measurements to create different shades.
  • To let stationery dry without disturbing the dye, secure the card stock to a wire hanger with clothespins.

 

For more ideas from Alison Caporimo, follow her on Twitter.

Text adapted from Instacraft, with permission from Ulysses Press. Copyright 2013. All images by Meera Lee Patel.

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Grooming Dad: Handmade Soaps from Tanner Goods and Maak Soap Labs

Friday, April 13th, 2012

Parents Magazine, Maak Soap Lab, Tanner Goods

I love when I find a great product that’s made by hand, and it really shows you that sometimes you can’t beat an artisanal item. About a year ago, Maak Soap Labs and Tanner Goods, out of Portland, Oregon, joined forces to create a line of soaps that capture the scent of Cascadia. They ended up with two outdoorsy smells, Upland and Wildwood. They are both made from all-natural ingredients and scented with oils from plants that are indigenous to the region. One added bonus of the bar soaps is that they’re airplane friendly. No liquid means no hassle from the TSA.

Saying they smell good might be an understatement. I kept them on my desk for several days just to make sure I could take a whiff when I needed a “trip” to the mountains. After I finally used the soap for it’s intended purpose, I was pleased with the lather and how the scent didn’t intensify with the water. Plus, my skin felt clean, not dry, after rinsing.

Overall, I think that both scents are worth your while. Wildwood (the green one) is more piney smelling than Upland, but both are very fresh so it’s really up to your personal preference. You can find these handmade soaps at Tanner Goods, where they retail for $9 a bar. You can also read more about their process here.

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Birthing Dolls for Kids?

Thursday, December 9th, 2010

Explaining that  a new baby is on the way can get difficult when kids are a certain age. The stork story doesn’t quite fly anymore, but explaining natural childbirth can be confusing for toddlers and awkward for parents.

So maybe the best way to explain the new arrival is with a MamAmor Doll. We first learned about her on Café Mom.  These dolls naturally birth babies—umbilical cord, placenta and all. There’s even a snap for the doll to breastfeed her newborn. The creators of these dolls are proponents of natural childbirth, attachment parenting, breastfeeding and open conversations with young children.

We can’t seem to decide what to make of these dolls! With prices starting at $130, they’re not exactly cheap but then again it’s a small price to pay to teach your toddler about what to expect. The FaceBook fan page has more than 3,500 followers. The doll’s definitely better than any educational video we’ve seen!

Would you buy one of these dolls? What do you think of them?

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Motherhood: A ‘Prison’ for Women?

Monday, November 8th, 2010

100sq_MTN100Erica Jong certainly thinks so. In her controversial  ”Mother Madness” essay that appeared in Saturday’s Wall Street Journal,  the novelist and poet argues strenuously against “attachment parenting”—a method that calls for an almost constant mental and physical connection between mother and child.

Jong makes the case that in today’s hectic world of busy working mothers such a style is completely impractical when the daily demands of these women are taken into account. “You wear your baby, sleep with her and attune yourself totally to her needs. How you do this and also earn the money to keep her is rarely discussed. You are just assumed to be rich enough,” she writes.

Jong says that while attachment parenting calls for the mother and father to be available to their baby almost constantly, creating a support group of multiple caregivers is not only helpful to stressed out parents but is also essential to raising a well-socialized, independent child. “Kinship is not exclusively biological, after all, and you need a brood to raise a brood,” she writes.

Similarly, she continues, simply because a woman chooses not to breastfeed, make her own baby food, or use cloth diapers does not by any means make her a less-loving or less capable mother. “We need to be released from guilt about our children, not further bound by it,” she explains. ”We need someone to say: Do the best you can. There are no rules.”

Needless to say, many commentors and bloggers have pounced on Jong and come to the defense of attachment parenting. Share your take with us!

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