Posts Tagged ‘ mumps ’

Original Study Linking Autism and Vaccines a ‘Fraud’

Thursday, January 6th, 2011

In 1998, a British doctor named Andrew Wakefield published a research paper suggestion autism in children was linked to the measles mumps rubella (MMR) vaccine.  The groundbreaking research was published in The Lancet, a medical journal specialzing in oncology, neurology, and infectious diseases. 

While some medical professionals were skeptical of the research results and discredited it, some doctors and parents voiced their support for the research and became suspicious about other vaccines.   Some moms, including celeb mom Jenny McCarthy, became pickier about vaccinations or stopped vaccinating their children completely.

Even though The Lancet retracted Dr. Wakefield’s research in early 2010, a recent editorial in the the British Medical Journal has publicly denounced Dr. Wakefield’s research as “fraudulent.”  The editorial asserts that Dr. Wakefield “falsified data” and tampered with his research results to give the (MMR) vaccine bad publicity.  At the time, Dr. Wakefield was involved in a lawsuit against the manufacturers of the (MMR) vaccine and would have gained money for winning–an obvious conflict of interest.

After the research was released in 1998, there was a sharp decrease in parents giving their children the (MMR) vaccine.  Even though the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports 90% of children in the United States are vaccinated, mumps remain the second most common disease that can be easily vaccinated.  Also, in 2008, reports for measles reached an all-time high since 1997, and about 90% of the kids with measles hadn’t been vaccinated.

Since Dr. Wakefield has been unable to reproduce his research results and there are no other conclusive studies, there is no proof that autism is linked to the (MMR) vaccine or other vaccines.  However, the new information has lead parents to wonder if they should have vaccinated their children, while doctors are disturbed how one study prevented children from getting necessary medical attention.

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As a parent, do you believe autism is still linked to vaccinations ? Do you vaccinate your children and will you continue to do so? Share your thoughts in the comments section.

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Sure Shot

Tuesday, April 27th, 2010

This is National Infant Immunization Week, commemorated by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to stress the importance of vaccinations. This year there’s a new component: the Protect Tomorrow campaign. The point of this campaign, launched by the American Academy of Pediatrics, is to remind parents of the diseases that once wreaked so much havoc in the lives of children—ones like mumps, measles, and diphtheria—which are all nearly eradicated, but could easily resurface in a big way if we don’t immunize our kids.

One of our advisors, pediatrician Alanna Levine, M.D., is a big supporter of Protect Tomorrow. “I feel especially connected to this project because my father suffered from polio as a child,” she told us. “His story of being 13 years old and sitting in a glass cubicle, watching the man next to him die, has had a huge impact on me, and I hope it will do the same for parents who have concerns about vaccinating their own children.”

We at Parents stay on top of the research on vaccines. We understand the fears mothers and fathers have. And we realize that all of the conflicting advice out there can be unnerving. But ultimately, we emphasize that all approved vaccines are safe for healthy children. To this end, we’re running a story in our May issue called “Vaccines: Getting to the Point.” It’s a thoroughly reported examination of the theories and myths that still abound on the topic, and it may put to rest a few of your own.

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