Posts Tagged ‘ milk ’

New Guidelines For Introducing Allergenic Foods

Wednesday, March 13th, 2013

Throughout my entire childhood (which I bid a fond farewell to roughly a decade ago), I can remember one person I knew with a food allergy—a boy at summer camp who was so allergic to peanuts we couldn’t serve peanut butter in the dining hall. Back then banning peanut butter felt like a foreign concept; today it seems common. I’ve often wondered if the apparent rise in food sensitivities is all in my head. Whether I was just oblivious to friends and classmates who couldn’t eat eggs, nuts, wheat, or other allergenic foods, and whether I’m simply more aware of food allergies now, working at Parents. That doesn’t appear to be the case. According to Food Allergy Research and Education, food allergies are on the rise: The number of people with a food allergy rose 18 percent between 1997 and 2007, and today 1 in 13 kids is affected, or roughly two in every classroom. What if there was a way to stop this trend in its tracks? A recent study from the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology suggests parents may be able to do just that, by introducing the most common allergenic foods—cow’s milk, eggs, soy, wheat, peanuts, tree nuts, fish, and shellfish—around the time you start solids, generally between 4 and 6 months. “Food allergies have increased in the last 10 years, and it’s possible that delaying the introduction of allergenic foods has contributed to that,” says study coauthor David Fleischer, M.D., an associate professor of pediatrics at National Jewish Health, in Denver, Colorado. “There’s a window of tolerance for preventing food allergies.”

Before now there haven’t been any updated guidelines on how to give these foods to a child, and some parents may still follow the recommendations from 13 years ago, which advised against offering your child cow’s milk until age 1, eggs until age 2, and nuts and fish until age 3. But after looking over past research, Dr. Fleischer says it’s safe—and beneficial—to introduce these foods earlier, with a couple exceptions. Children with moderate to severe eczema, which puts them at higher risk for food allergies, and those who’ve already had a reaction to an allergenic food should see an allergist before trying any of the above (and below!) mentioned foods.

Now, without further ado, the most recent advice for introducing cow’s milk, eggs, soy, wheat, peanuts, tree nuts, fish, and shellfish:

  • Do not offer your child one of these highly allergenic foods as the first solid. Begin with rice or oat cereal, vegetables, or fruit to see how your child handles them. Once you’ve successfully introduced a few of these foods, you can begin to offer foods like fish, eggs, and yogurt.
  • The first time you introduce an allergenic food, give it to your child at home, rather than at day care or a restaurant. If there is no apparent reaction—including hives, a rash, swelling, breathing problems, vomiting, or diarrhea—continue to offer the food to your child, gradually increasing the amount.
  • Offer one new food every 3 to 5 days if you don’t see any reactions.
  • Continue to avoid whole cow’s milk until age 1, but not because of allergy risk—it can lead to kidney complications and may affect iron levels in the body. Cheese, yogurt, and milk-based formulas are fine to offer.
  • Peanuts and tree nuts pose a choking risk, so should not be offered before age 1, but nut butters are safe. If you have an older child with a nut allergy, see an allergist before offering peanut butter to your younger child—he’s at an increased risk for developing a peanut allergy.

 

Image: Spoon and jar of peanut butter

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, December 20th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Occasional Family Meals Enough to Boost Kids’ Fruit and Veggie Intake
Eating meals together as a family, even if only once or twice a week, increases children’s daily fruit and vegetable intake to near the recommended 5 A Day, according to new research. (via ScienceDaily)

Probiotics Might Limit Infant Skin Problems
Children who take a supplement of probiotics – those “good” bacteria that live in our guts – are less likely to develop eczema, according to a new review of studies. (via Reuters)

Two Cups of Milk Daily Enough For Most Kids
Two cups of cow’s milk per day may be enough for most kids to have the recommended amount of vitamin D in their blood while maintaining a healthy iron level, suggests a new study. (via Reuters)

New Online Privacy Rules For Children
In a move intended to give parents greater control over data collected about their children online, federal regulators on Wednesday broadened longstanding privacy safeguards covering children’s mobile apps and Web sites. (via New York Times)

Teen’s Views on Dangers of Pot Fall to 20-Year Low
Teenagers’ perception of the dangers of marijuana has fallen to the lowest level in more than 20 years, a new study says, prompting federal researchers to warn that already high use of the drug could increase as more states move to legalize it. (via ABC News)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Monday, August 22nd, 2011

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Eager for Spotlight, but Not if It Is on a Testing Scandal
A former schools chancellor in Washington has refused to talk to USA Today reporters about a cheating scandal.

Falls from windows injure 5,100 kids every year
Every year, more than 5,100 American kids go to the hospital with injuries after falling out of windows, and a quarter of them are serious enough for the children to be admitted, according to the first nationwide study of the problem.

The Placenta Cookbook
For a growing number of new mothers, there’s no better nutritional snack after childbirth than the fruit of their own labor.

Calories, sugar reduced in flavored milk for kids
Good news for milk-pushing moms this September: kid-favorite flavored milks will have less calories and sugar, according to the Milk Processor Education Program.

Congenital heart disease screening recommended for newborns
Before newborns leave the hospital, they should receive a simple, pain-free test to check for signs of congenital heart disease, one of the most common types of birth defects, according to a recommendation by a federal advisory panel.

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