Posts Tagged ‘ mental illness ’

Parents Daily News Roundup

Wednesday, March 6th, 2013

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

The Rise of Tablets as Textbooks
Well before the cleanup from Superstorm Sandy was in full swing, students could read about the weather system that slammed the East Coast in their textbooks. Welcome to the new digital bookcase, where traditional ink-and-paper textbooks have given way to iPads and book bags are getting lighter. (via Huffington Post)

CPS Sex Education: Nation’s Third Largest District Extending Lessons to Kindergarteners (VIDEO)
Is five years old too young to begin receiving sex education lessons? Last week, Chicago Public Schools’ Board of Education approved expanding expanding sexual education in their schools as a means of addressing the high rates of gonorrhea and Chlamydia cases among the city’s teens, as well as a teen HIV rate that has risen 43 percent since 2000, DNAinfo Chicago reports. (via Huffington Post)

New Video Game Detects Vision Problems in Children
Technology is changing the way we view the world, and the American education system is no exception. With as many as one in four children living with undiagnosed vision disorders that may be affecting their performance in school, it’s more important than ever for kids to get screened early. (via Fox News)

New Allergy Guidelines Advises Giving Babies Peanuts Earlier
An article in Tuesday’s Wall Street Journal highlights a new approach to combating food allergies: Introducing allergenic foods like peanut butter and eggs to babies as young as 4 to 6 months old, according to a study in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice. (via Fox News)

Parents to Congress: Police No Solution to Mental Illness
Liza Long’s son first went into the juvenile justice system at 11. He’s mentally ill, but the woman who wrote the viral Internet essay “I am Adam Lanza’s mother” told Congress the police are often the only authorities who can help deal with violent, mentally ill children. (via NBC News)

Rate of Caesarean Deliveries Varies Widely Across U.S.
The rate of Caesarean deliveries, the most common operating-room procedure performed in the United States, varies drastically among hospitals across the country, a new study has found, ranging from 7 percent of all births at the hospital with the lowest share of Caesarean deliveries to 70 percent at the hospital with the highest rate. (via New York Times)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Monday, March 4th, 2013

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Study: Childhood ADHD May Lead to Troubles Later On
Nearly a third of people diagnosed as children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) still have the condition in adulthood, according to a large new study that also found they’re more likely to develop other mental disorders and to commit suicide. (via Reuters)

K-12 Student Database Jazzes Tech Startups, Spooks Parents
An education technology conference this week in Austin, Texas, will clang with bells and whistles as startups eagerly show off their latest wares. (via Reuters)

U.S. Baby’s HIV Infection Cured Through Very Early Treatment
A baby girl in Mississippi who was born with HIV has been cured after very early treatment with standard HIV drugs, U.S. researchers reported on Sunday, in a potentially ground-breaking case that could offer insights on how to eradicate HIV infection in its youngest victims. (via Reuters)

Rewards Get Kids Active, But Don’t Improve Health
Children will meet activity goals to earn rewards, but the extra effort doesn’t necessarily affect their weight and health, according to a new study. (via FOX News)

Los Angeles Board Race Attracts National Attention and Money
On Tuesday, voters in Los Angeles will go to the polls for a mayoral primary. But much of the attention will also be on the three races for the school board, a battle that involves the mayor, the teachers’ union and a host of advocates from across the country — including New York City’s billionaire mayor — who have poured millions of dollars into the races. (via New York Times)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Monday, February 25th, 2013

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Pediatricians Oppose School Suspension, Expulsion
A group representing pediatricians says disciplining students with out-of-school suspension or expulsion is counterproductive to school goals and should only be used on case by case basis. (via Reuters)

Do Antidepressants Hurt Babies? The Scary Thing Is, No One’s Sure
It’s a myth that pregnancy is usually one of the happiest times of a woman’s life. Sure, many are delighted to be pregnant; but at least 14 percent of pregnant women are depressed during pregnancy. Pregnancy, in fact, is now recognized as one of the highest risk periods for mental illness among women. (via Take Part)

Doctors Issue New Guidelines for Treating Kids’ Ear Infections
The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) is putting out new guidelines for pediatricians and parents to follow regarding ear infections. (via Fox News)

Fluoride: Necessary or Too Much of a Good Thing?
Community water fluoridation has been around for more than 65 years, and although proponents cite many benefits, the practice has come under fire recently as critics are questioning the amount our children are consuming – and if it’s even necessary. (via Fox News)

Don’t Tell Kids About Past Drug Use, Study Finds
A study, published in the journal Human Communication Research, found that children whose parents did not disclose drug use, but did deliver a strong antidrug message, were much more likely to develop anti-drug attitudes of their own. When parents did share their own experiences, even when they were very negative ones, the anti-drug message was blunted. (via Today)

Moms Go Topless to Save Kids’ School Bus
When it comes to raising money to help overcome educational budget cuts, there are the old, reliable methods, like the silent auction or a fancy gala, and then there’s the racy route. (via Today)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, November 29th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Pregnant Women Most Vulnerable to Flu
The World Health Organization says pregnant women should be given top priority for flu vaccinations this season, putting them above the elderly, children, and people with chronic health conditions. (via ABC News)

Predicting Obesity at Birth
Researchers say they have a formula for divining which newborns are at the highest risk of becoming obese during childhood. (via Time)

For Children, a Lie on Facebook Has Consequences, Study Finds
A federal law intended to protect children’s privacy may unwittingly lead them to reveal too much on Facebook, a provocative new academic study shows. (via New York Times)

Experts Call for Mental Illness Screening for Children
Leading mental health experts are calling for school children to be screened for risk of mental illnesses such as depression and have devised a test that reliably identifies those at high risk. (via MSNBC)

Online Tool Creates Catch-Up Immunization Schedules
A new online tool takes the guesswork out of developing individualized catch-up immunization schedules by allowing parents and health care providers to easily create a schedule that ensures missed vaccines and future vaccines are administered according to approved guidelines. (via ScienceDaily)

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An Open Letter to Parents Whose Children Don’t Have Autism

Monday, October 8th, 2012

My friend’s sister has four children, ages 14, 13, 7, and 3. This woman’s 13-year-old son has a severe form of autism and a mood disorder with psychotic episodes; doctors have told his parents that their son is a very unusual case. As a result, life is extremely challenging for the entire family. Because their son is prone to frequent and uncontrollable outbursts, they’re all having a particularly difficult time in the condo complex where they moved last year for his mother’s job as a biotech scientist. Her heartbreaking Facebook post, which she allowed me to share, strikes me as the kind of thing every parent should read, particularly if he or she doesn’t have a child with autism–or any other disability or mental illness.

“I would like to say something to those people in our community who look at my husband, myself, and our disabled son in disgust or shout out your windows for us to just keep him quiet. He is a minor inconvenience to you. You get to go back to your lives, travel as you please, eat what you please, and go about your merry way. Imagine what it is like for us, constantly struggling to keep our son safe. Imagine what it is like for our other three children, whose friends’ parents won’t allow them to come over while our son is home, who are constantly told they can’t go places because it’s too difficult, and who often can’t make their needs heard above his yelling. But most of all, imagine what it is like for our son, whose level of anxiety is so great, whose suffering is so enormous, that he is driven to cry, driven to scream, driven to bang his head and bite his arms and legs. Have you ever in your life felt so much pain that you were driven to that? Be grateful for what you have, for being born with a normal functioning brain, and maybe you would consider being helpful instead. We could always use a home-cooked dinner, an offer to take one of our other children to a movie, or just a smile of support.”

Image: autism symbol design isolated on white background via Shutterstock.

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