Posts Tagged ‘ mental health ’

Speaking Honestly About Children’s Mental Health

Thursday, May 9th, 2013

It’s been said that “a mother is only as happy as her least happy child,” and it’s so true that children’s mental health affects the whole family. If your child suffers from anxiety or depression or ADHD, you want to get her the best treatment just like you would if she had diabetes or asthma or cancer. And yet, stigma still does exist, and can get in the way of addressing a child’s problem. In our recent survey of more than 1,600 parents conducted in partnership with the Child Mind Institute, 48% said they think parents are to blame for children who exhibit disruptive behavior.

In the wake of the tragedy in Newtown, there has been a call for improved mental health care—and mental health advocates are seizing this opportunity to talk about the importance of effective diagnosis and treatment. Indeed, our survey found that 60% of parents are concerned that kids who have a mental illness like Asperger’s Syndrome or depression are more likely to hurt themselves or others, and 61% of parents said that parents of children with mental health problems should not be allowed to have a gun in their home. However, the truth is that most violent crimes are not actually committed by people who are mentally ill, and kids with mental health issues can grow up to lead happy, productive lives when they get proper care.

“The Newtown shooting has lead to a national conversation about mental health—not just to prevent potential violence, which is very rare, but to prevent suffering, which is very common and often very treatable,” says Parents advisor Harold Koplewicz, M.D., president of the Child Mind Institute. “What we hope will come from the tragedy is openness that starts in each family and community, when we acknowledge our worries about our own children, and help make other parents feel safe enough to speak up about their worries, too.”

One piece of good news from our survey: 66% of respondents do believe that parents are now more likely to seek help if their child’s behavior worries them. We’ve also been encouraged to learn that an increasing number of pediatricians now have mental-health professionals working right in their office. Not only does that make access to care easier, but it sends a message that mental heath is just as important as physical health.

You can participate in the Speak Up For Kids campaign and learn more from the online events being hosted by the Child Mind Institute in honor of National Children’s Mental Health Awareness Month.

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, May 2nd, 2013

Oregon Teachers Fail Active Shooter Drill As Masked Men Shoot Blanks At Surprised Faculty
Cammie DeCastro, principal of the Pine Eagle Charter School in Halfway, Ore., admits that the plan she had to protect her school from an armed gunman is in tatters after two masked men stormed in and appeared to open fire on a meeting room full of teachers last Friday, The Oregonian reports. (via Huffington Post)

Shedding Light On the Long Shadow of Childhood Adversity
Childhood adversity can lead to chronic physical and mental disability in adult life and have an effect on the next generation, underscoring the importance of research, practice and policy in addressing this issue, according to a Viewpoint in the May 1 issue of JAMA, a theme issue on child health. (via Science Daily)

Food, skin allergies increasing in children
Parents are reporting more skin and food allergies in their children, a big government survey found. (via Fox News)

Traffic noise linked with kids’ hyperactivity
Children who live near a noisy road may be at an increased risk of hyperactivity, according to a new study from Germany. (via Fox News)

Amusement rides linked to 4,000 injuries in children each year
Nervous parents may fret about dangerous-looking roller coasters with precipitous drops, or rusty Ferris wheels in traveling fairs, but it turns out that for young children, coin-operated rides in malls and restaurants may be more of a cause for concern than expected, according to a new study. (via Fox News)

Kiera Wilmot, 16, Arrested And Expelled For Explosive ‘Science Experiment’
Wilmot, a Bartow High School student, was arrested at her school last week for allegedly detonating a water bottle filled with an explosive concoction of common household chemicals. (via Huffington Post)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Friday, February 22nd, 2013

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Girls In New York City Forced To Fight In YouTube Video
A video of two young girls being forced to fight each other in a New York City park has surfaced, catching the attention of authorities, Gothamist reports. (via Huffington Post)

Early Life Stress May Take Early Toll On Heart Function
Early life stress like that experienced by ill newborns appears to take an early toll of the heart, affecting its ability to relax and refill with oxygen-rich blood, researchers report. (via Science Daily)

Most Women Misunderstand IUD Birth Control
In a new survey, most women had inaccurate perceptions about the safety and effectiveness of intrauterine devices (IUDs) in preventing pregnancy, say U.S. researchers, who urge doctors to talk more about the benefits of the devices. (via Reuters)

The Pain of Bullying Lasts Into Adulthood
Kids don’t easily outgrow the pain of bullying, according to a new study that finds that people bullied as kids are less mentally healthy as adults. (via LiveScience)

FDA Approves Roche Drug for Late-stage Metastatic Breast Cancer
U.S. health regulators said on Friday they have approved a new drug made by Roche Holding AG for some patients with late-stage metastatic breast cancer who have failed other therapies. (via Reuters)

Experts Issue Guidelines for Gene Tests in Kids
Groups representing pediatricians and geneticists issued new recommendations on Thursday to provide doctors with guidance about when to test a child’s DNA for genetic conditions. (via Fox News)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, February 21st, 2013

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Teacher Survey Shows Record Low Job Satisfaction in 2012
As school districts continued to cut budgets, increase class sizes, and implement teacher performance evaluations, teachers’ job satisfaction plummeted in 2012, reaching an all-time low, according to a survey released Thursday. (via Huffington Post)

Standardized Test Boycotts, Protests Gain Momentum Around U.S.
High school students and teachers in cities around the U.S. have decided they hate standardized tests so much, they’re just not going to take them, according to news reports.
(via Huffington Post)

Lasting Legacy of Childhood Bullying: Psychiatric Problems in Adulthood
It’s not just the victims of bullying that experience long-term consequences; bullies themselves are also at risk of mental health issues later in life. (via TIME)

Adults Cut Back Fast Food, but U.S. Kids Still Eat Too Much Fat-CDC
American adults have made a little progress in recent years in cutting back on calories from fast food, but children are still consuming too much fat, U.S. health researchers say. (via Reuters)

Caffeine Linked to Low Birth Weight In Babies
One cup of fresh coffee a day significantly increases the chances of giving birth to an underweight baby, a study has found. The new findings from a large Scandinavian study suggest current guidelines on caffeine consumption during pregnancy may not go far enough. (via Fox News)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Friday, September 28th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Preschoolers Use Scientific Reasoning, Study Says
A review article in the journal Science sums up a swath of research suggesting that preschoolers can make deductions about cause and effect, infer preferences and test hypotheses. (via CNN)

Possible Link Between Infants’ Regulatory Behaviors and Maternal Mental Health
It is believed that maternal anxiety and depression can influence the child’s capacity to self-regulate, but infant problems can also exaggerate parental mental health issues. (via Science Daily)

U.S. Is Tightening Web Privacy Rule to Shield Young
Federal regulators are about to take the biggest steps in more than a decade to protect children’s privacy online. (via New York Times)

Researchers Investigate Aggression Among Kindergartners
Not all aggressive children are aggressive for the same reasons, according to researchers, who found that some kindergartners who are aggressive show low verbal abilities while others are more easily physiologically aroused. The findings suggest that different types of treatments may be needed to help kids with different underlying causes for problem behavior. (via Science Daily)

Physical Activity Interventions for Children Have ‘Little Impact’, Study Suggests
Physical activity interventions for children have small impact on overall activity levels and consequently the body fat and mass of children, a study suggests. (via Science Daily)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Monday, August 6th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Violent Cartoons Linked to Sleep Problems in Preschoolers
Swapping Batman for Big Bird could help young kids sleep better, a new study found. The study of sleep habits among 565 preschool-age children found that those who tuned in to age-appropriate educational programs were less likely to have sleep problems than those who watched sparring superheroes or slapstick scenes meant for slightly older kids. (via ABC News)

A White Dad Does His Black Daughter’s Hair, and the Internet Smiles
The little family moments are often the ones we wind up treasuring over the years. Usually, they’re lost in the shuffle of daily life, but sometimes they’re captured on camera. And sometimes, those pictures capture the hearts of people everywhere. Such is the case of a picture posted on Facebook by Frank Somerville, a TV news anchor in Oakland, CA. (via MSNBC)

Parents Get Physical With Unruly Kids, Study Finds
Parents get physical with their misbehaving children in public much more than they show in laboratory experiments and acknowledge in surveys, according to one of the first real-world studies of caregiver discipline. (via Science Daily)

Gold Medal Mom: ‘I Felt Selfish’ Training for Olympics
For every woman who feels like she’s had to scale back her personal ambitions since becoming a mother, gold medal cyclist Kristin Armstrong has a message: Don’t give up on your dreams. (via Today.com)

Motherhood May Make You Smarter, New Study Says
In the study, women who were new mothers scored better on tests of visuospatial memory — the ability to perceive and remember information about their surroundings — compared with women who didn’t have children. (via MSNBC)

Growing Up Grateful Gives Teens Multiple Mental Health Benefits
Grateful teens are more likely than their less grateful peers to be happy, less likely to abuse drugs and alcohol and less likely to have behavior problems at school, according to research presented at the American Psychological Association’s 120th Annual Convention. (via Science Daily)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, August 2nd, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Fudge Factor: Americans in Denial About Weight Gain
Researchers from the University of Washington found people — especially men — often think they are losing weight when they really aren’t, a new study shows. (via NBC News)

Study: Shaky Mental Health Linked to Higher Death Risk
Among disease-free, healthy adults included within a new U.K. study, the more signs of psychological distress people had, the higher the death rates they experienced — even at low levels of distress and even after accounting for a large number of health conditions and health behaviors that might explain the link. (via TIME)

23andMe Seeks FDA Approval for Personal DNA Test
Genetic test maker 23andMe is asking the Food and Drug Administration to approve its personalized DNA test. The company’s saliva-based kits have attracted scrutiny for claiming to help users detect whether they are likely to develop illnesses like breast cancer, heart disease, and Alzheimer’s. (via Associated Press)

Why Lack of Sleep Weakens Vaccine Effectiveness
A new study shows people getting less than six hours of sleep per night on average were far less likely than longer sleepers to show adequate antibody responses to the vaccine and so they were far more likely — 11.5 times more likely — to be unprotected by the immunization. (via TIME)

Mindfulness Training May Improve Health and Well-Being of Pregnant Women and Newborns
First-time mothers who pay attention to their emotional and physical changes during their pregnancy may feel better and have healthier newborns than new mothers who don’t, research suggests. (via Science Daily)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, July 5th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Mother’s Blood Shows Birth Defects in Fetal DNA
Researchers said they were able to sequence the entire genome of a fetus using only a blood sample from the mother, an advance in the effort to find noninvasive ways for expectant parents to determine if their babies will be born with genetic conditions. (via Fox News)

Smoking Mothers’ Embryos ‘Grow More Slowly’
French academics in an IVF clinic took regular pictures of an egg from the moment it was fertilized until it was ready to be implanted into the mother. At all stages of development, embryos from smokers were consistently a couple of hours behind, a study showed. (via BBC News)

Too Much Coffee Could Hurt Women’s Chances of IVF Success
Women who drank five or more cups of coffee a day were about 50% less likely to get pregnant through in-vitro fertilization than non-drinkers, according to a recent Danish study. The authors noted it was “comparable to the detrimental effect of smoking.” (via TIME)

Company Studying OxyContin’s Effect in Children
The maker of the prescription painkiller OxyContin confirms that a clinical trial is currently underway to measure the opioid’s effects in children. Although doctors can prescribe OxyContin off-label to pediatric patients, the drug — which was overwhelmingly tested in adults — is not approved for use in children by the Food and Drug Administration. (via CNN)

Premature Birth May Raise Risk for Mental Illness, Study Reports
Young adults born very premature — at less than 32 weeks’ gestation — were more than twice as likely to be hospitalized for schizophrenia or delusional disorders, almost three times as likely for major depression, and more than seven times as likely for bipolar illness. (via NY Times)

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