Posts Tagged ‘ medication ’

Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, November 1st, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Five Year Olds Are Generous Only When They’re Watched
Children as young as five are generous when others are aware of their actions, but antisocial when sharing with a recipient who can’t see them, according to new research. (via ScienceDaily)

Dentists Offering Cash for Halloween Candy to Benefit Troops
While many children are chowing down on their Halloween candy, dentists are hoping to provide kids with some incentives for trading in their sugary treats—all in a way to help the troops. (via Fox News)

Is Childhood ADHD a Gateway to Smoking in Adulthood?
Children diagnosed with ADHD are twice as likely to pick up smoking than youngsters without the disorder. (via Time)

Breast Milk During The Storm: With Power Gone, Moms Safeguard their Stash
With power out in much of New Jersey and swaths of New York in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, breast-feeding moms have been frantically making arrangements, scouting out freezers and using Facebook to link up those with thawing breast milk with those who have electricity and freezer space to spare. (via Time)

Technology Changing How Students Learn, Teachers Say
There is a widespread belief among teachers that students’ constant use of digital technology is hampering their attention spans and ability to persevere in the face of challenging tasks, according to two new surveys of teachers. (via New York Times)

Many Women Stop Their Asthma Meds While Pregnant
Almost a third of women on asthma control medications stop using them during the first few months of pregnancy, despite advice that a mother’s uncontrolled asthma is more dangerous to the developing fetus than the drugs. (via Reuters)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Wednesday, July 25th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Study Finds Scarcity of Drug Trials in Kids
Relatively few clinical trials have tested the safety and effectiveness of medications in children – even when kids make up a large share of patients with the condition the drug treats, a new study finds. (via Reuters)

Peg Perego Recalls 223,000 Strollers for Strangulation Risk
The stroller manufacturer recalled 223,000 strollers on Tuesday because of the risk of children getting their heads caught between the stroller tray and seat bottom and strangling. (via TIME)

Docs at Odds Over Kids’ Cholesterol Test Guidance
Doctors are still debating whether all U.S. children should be tested for high cholesterol, months after a government-appointed panel recommended widespread screening that would lead to prescribing medicine for some kids. New criticism was published Monday by the journal Pediatrics. (via Associated Press)

Enrollment Off in Big Districts, Forcing Layoffs
Enrollment in nearly half of the nation’s largest school districts has dropped steadily over the last five years, triggering school closings, layoffs of essential staff and concerns that the students who remain are some of the neediest and most difficult to educate. (via NY Times)

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FDA Warning: Beware of Teething Medication with Benzocaine

Tuesday, May 10th, 2011

Teething babyThe ingredient (benzocaine), used in medications that soothe a baby’s teething pain, can cause a rare but serious condition known as methemoglobinemia.  Methemoglobinemia reduces oxygen in the bloodstream,  which can lead to death. 

According to the FDA, which issued a warning in early April, the symptoms of methemoglobinemia include pale, gray, or blue-colored skin, lips, and nail beds; shortness of breath; confusion; headache; lightheadedness; and rapid heart rate.  The condition is caused by gels and liquids containing benzocaine, with concentrations as low as 7.5% and symptoms can appear within minutes or hours of application.

So far, children 2 years and younger have been affected by benzocaine.  The FDA warns against giving children under 2 any medication containing benzocaine, unless directed by a pediatrician.  Naural ways to soothe baby’s pain include giving your child a chilled teething ring or rubbing/massaging  the gums with your fingers, suggests the American Academy of Pediatrics.  Otherwise, seek advice from a healthcare professional.

Name-brand medications that include benzocaine are Baby Orajel, Orajel, Anbesol, Hurricaine, and Orabase.  However, there are still benzocaine-free OTC teething medicines available.  Church & Dwight, the makers of Orajel, have released Baby Orajel Naturals, which contains clove oil instead of benzocaine, alcohol, and dye to relieve teething symptoms.  They are also working with the FDA to determine the best actions for using benzocaine in children under 2 years old.  Boiron has also released a homeopathic teething medicine called Camilia that comes in pre-measured, individual doses and is free of benzocaine, preservatives, flavors, dyes, and sugar/artificial sweeteners.

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Over-the-Counter Infant Medicine with Acetaminophen Will No Longer Be Produced

Thursday, May 5th, 2011

Consumer Healthcare Products AssociationStarting as early as June, over-the-counter drug manufacturers will no longer produce acetaminophen in concentrated liquid drops for infants.  Acetaminophen, a common ingredient in various OTC medications for children, is included to reduce symptoms of pain and fever.

The Consumer Healthcare Products Association (CHPA), a non-for-profit group that represents OTC drug manufacturers, decided on this step to reduce dosing errors and prevent accidental poisonings in infants.  Currently, liquid acetaminophen is sold in two concentrations: 80 mg/0.8 mL or 80 mg/1.0 mL, with droppers for infants; 160 mg/5 mL, with cups for children ages 2-11.  The two different concentrations have often caused confusion, leading parents to give kids incorrect doses due to badly-marked droppers or cups. 

Johnson & Johnson and other drug manufacturers will cease production of the 80 mg/0.8 mL and the 80 mg/1.0 mL concentrations through 2012.  Instead, 160 mg/5 mL will become the standard concentration for all ages, along with cups for older kids and new syringes with flow restrictors for infants, which will provide accurate dosing and reduce spills.  Most medications with acetaminophen do not have proper dosing instructions for kids under 2 years; instead, the labels instruct parents to contact pediatricians.  Tylenol, produced by Johnson & Johnson, will be working on a case to urge the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to include correct acetaminophen dosing information for children 6 months and up on labels.

For now, both concentrations will still be on shelves until CHPA can work with retailers to remove the infant concentrations.  Parents can keep acetominophen medications they already have or purchase them in stores, but read labels and dosing directions carefully.  Always consult a trusted pediatrician to clarify the concentration of your child’s dose, especially if you have any questions or concerns.

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Chewable Zyrtec Tablets Unavailable Until 2012

Tuesday, February 8th, 2011

zyrtec-chewableParents who depend on Children’s Zyrtec Chewable Tablets to treat their kids’ allergies will need to speak to their pediatricans about other safe, alternative over-the-counter medication. Mitch Lipka on Consumer Ally reports the tablets are not being recalled, but being made unavailable until 2012 because of changes in production and manufacturing. 

According to Consumer Ally, after McNeil recalled Children’s Benadryl Allergy Fastmelts, Motrin Junior Strength Caplets, and other medication last year, Johnson & Johnson recommitted to producing medication “to the levels of quality and compliance that consumers expect….”   Johnson & Johnson’s McNeil Consumer Healthcare recently made the decision to stop outsourcing production of Zyrtec Chewable Tablets and begin manufacturing them in-house, which means they won’t be ready until next year.

In the meantime, kids age 6 and older can still take other types of Zyrtec tablets and liquid gels.  Read more on Consumer Ally.

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Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, December 28th, 2010

Goody Blog Daily News RoundupVitamin D Helps Kids’ Breathing, Study Says: Are Supplements Smart?
Strong bones aren’t the only benefit of vitamin D. A new study suggests that the “sunshine vitamin” helps prevent breathing problems in infants and young children.”Our data suggest that the association between vitamin D and wheezing, which can be a symptom of many respiratory diseases and not just asthma, is largely due to respiratory infections,” study leader Dr. Carlos Camargo, associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, said in a written statement. [CBS News]

Madonna Plays Santa for Malawi Children
Madonna wasn’t able to visit Malawi this Christmas, but she let the children in the six orphanages she funds there know they were very much on her mind this holiday season.  Boxes of toys, chocolate, other sweets and clothes were shipped with a handwritten note from the star, which read, “To my Malawi children on Christmas and Boxing Day. I wish I was with you. See you soon M.” Inside the goodie boxes were miniature Christmas cards signed by Madonna, Lourdes and Rocco. [CNN]

Teacher Effort Is Linked To Difficult Students’ Inherited Traits
Challenging students take up more of their teachers’ time – and the difference between a tougher student and an easier one appears to be genetic, according to a new study published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. The study looked at young twins in the U.K. and asked their teachers how much of a handful they are. [Medical News Today]

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