Posts Tagged ‘ measles ’

Parents Daily News Roundup

Friday, April 20th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

CDC: 2011 Was Worst Measles Year in U.S. in 15 Years
Last year was the worst year for measles in the U.S. in 15 years, health officials said Thursday.

Birth Defects a Third More Common in IVF Babies
Babies conceived through certain fertility treatment techniques are about one-third more likely to have a birth defect than babies conceived without any extra help from technology, according to a review of several dozen studies.

TV On in the Background? It’s Still Bad for Kids
Too much television can be detrimental for kids’ development, even when they’re not plopped directly in front of the screen.

Domestic Violence May Stunt Babies’ Intellectual Growth
A longitudinal study uncovers the lifelong consequences of child abuse and exposure to interpersonal conflict in the first two years of life.

Controversial Ad Uses Breast-Feeding to Sell Cookies
The latest in the breast-feeding wars comes all the way from South Korea and involves the epitome of American snacktime: the Oreo cookie.

Working Moms’ Challenges: Paid Leave, Child Care
The past week’s political firestorm in the presidential race focused on stay-at-home moms, but two-thirds of women with young children now work. What some feel is being lost in the political debate are the challenges they face in the workplace.

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Wednesday, March 21st, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Pregnancy Safe After Breast Cancer, Study Finds
Contrary to past belief, it is safe to become pregnant after being treated for breast cancer, according to new research presented today at the eighth European Breast Cancer Conference in Vienna, Austria.

Bottled Water May Boost Kids’ Tooth Decay, Dentists Say
It turns out that many dentists and government health officials suspect that the practice of skipping tap water in favor of bottled water may be contributing to rising rates of tooth decay in young children.

Where Could the Next Outbreak of Measles Be?
Even as more American children are getting immunized against measles, diphtheria and other diseases, public-health officials are increasingly worried about potential outbreaks of these illnesses in certain pockets of the country where vaccination rates are dangerously low.

Panel Says Schools’ Failings Could Threaten Economy and National Security
The nation’s security and economic prosperity are at risk if schools do not improve, warns a report by a panel led by former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice and Joel I. Klein, a former chancellor of New York City’s school system.

Pink-Haired Student Invited Back to School
A school that barred a sixth grader after she dyed her hair pink with her parents’ blessing to celebrate her good grades lifted its ban on Tuesday following an outcry from civil rights advocates.

Parents Accused of Flying to Vegas, Leaving Kids Alone
Child endangerment charges have been filed against an Uptown couple accused of flying to Las Vegas and leave their two children, 12 and 9, home alone for nearly two days, police said.

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August Is National Immunization Awareness Month

Monday, August 15th, 2011

vaccinations-needles-shotsAs your child heads to school, make an appointment with the pediatrician to have her receive the necessary immunizations required by your state.  Vaccines guard your child against illnesses and diseases that may be encountered outside the home.   Parents.com consulted Dr. Daniel McGee of Helen DeVos Children’s Hospital in Grand Rapids, MI to find out what parents should know about immunizations.

Why are immunizations and vaccinations necessary and still important?

The illnesses that are included in the vaccines are real, not just something that occurred in grandma’s day.  According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), there have been more 150 cases of measles in the United States this year, as well as thousands of cases of whooping cough.  Measles outbreaks are occurring more frequently than in previous years. 

What are some diseases easily preventable by vaccinations?  How effective are  vaccinations against these diseases?

Measles, chicken pox, whooping cough as well as certain types of pneumonia and meningitis are the most common vaccine preventable diseases.  Immunized children who come down with an illness will usually have a less severe sickness.

Are there any vaccinations parents or adults should get to protect their family?

The only way to prevent whooping cough in children, particularly those under six months of age, is to make sure everyone who will come in contact with them is immunized.  This is a concept known as “cocooning.”  In fact, 75 percent of the time when an infant comes down with whooping cough, it comes from a parent, sibling, or grandparent.

As kids head to school, are there any new immunization protocols?  What should parents be aware of?

Immunization schedules change each year. Although not a new shot, there is a new recommendation that adolescents receive a booster dose of the meningitis vaccine if they received their first dose before age 16.  Every person aged 6 months and up should also receive the flu vaccine. 

What are the vaccinations all schools require?  What are the vaccinations children should always get?

This varies from state to state.  The best thing to do is follow the Centers for Disease Control guidelines which are endorsed by the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Academy of Family Physicians. With the exception of the HPV vaccine, almost all of the shots recommended by the AAP are required for school.

More About Immunizations and Vaccinations

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Original Study Linking Autism and Vaccines a ‘Fraud’

Thursday, January 6th, 2011

In 1998, a British doctor named Andrew Wakefield published a research paper suggestion autism in children was linked to the measles mumps rubella (MMR) vaccine.  The groundbreaking research was published in The Lancet, a medical journal specialzing in oncology, neurology, and infectious diseases. 

While some medical professionals were skeptical of the research results and discredited it, some doctors and parents voiced their support for the research and became suspicious about other vaccines.   Some moms, including celeb mom Jenny McCarthy, became pickier about vaccinations or stopped vaccinating their children completely.

Even though The Lancet retracted Dr. Wakefield’s research in early 2010, a recent editorial in the the British Medical Journal has publicly denounced Dr. Wakefield’s research as “fraudulent.”  The editorial asserts that Dr. Wakefield “falsified data” and tampered with his research results to give the (MMR) vaccine bad publicity.  At the time, Dr. Wakefield was involved in a lawsuit against the manufacturers of the (MMR) vaccine and would have gained money for winning–an obvious conflict of interest.

After the research was released in 1998, there was a sharp decrease in parents giving their children the (MMR) vaccine.  Even though the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports 90% of children in the United States are vaccinated, mumps remain the second most common disease that can be easily vaccinated.  Also, in 2008, reports for measles reached an all-time high since 1997, and about 90% of the kids with measles hadn’t been vaccinated.

Since Dr. Wakefield has been unable to reproduce his research results and there are no other conclusive studies, there is no proof that autism is linked to the (MMR) vaccine or other vaccines.  However, the new information has lead parents to wonder if they should have vaccinated their children, while doctors are disturbed how one study prevented children from getting necessary medical attention.

More Health Content on Parents.com:

As a parent, do you believe autism is still linked to vaccinations ? Do you vaccinate your children and will you continue to do so? Share your thoughts in the comments section.

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Sure Shot

Tuesday, April 27th, 2010

This is National Infant Immunization Week, commemorated by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to stress the importance of vaccinations. This year there’s a new component: the Protect Tomorrow campaign. The point of this campaign, launched by the American Academy of Pediatrics, is to remind parents of the diseases that once wreaked so much havoc in the lives of children—ones like mumps, measles, and diphtheria—which are all nearly eradicated, but could easily resurface in a big way if we don’t immunize our kids.

One of our advisors, pediatrician Alanna Levine, M.D., is a big supporter of Protect Tomorrow. “I feel especially connected to this project because my father suffered from polio as a child,” she told us. “His story of being 13 years old and sitting in a glass cubicle, watching the man next to him die, has had a huge impact on me, and I hope it will do the same for parents who have concerns about vaccinating their own children.”

We at Parents stay on top of the research on vaccines. We understand the fears mothers and fathers have. And we realize that all of the conflicting advice out there can be unnerving. But ultimately, we emphasize that all approved vaccines are safe for healthy children. To this end, we’re running a story in our May issue called “Vaccines: Getting to the Point.” It’s a thoroughly reported examination of the theories and myths that still abound on the topic, and it may put to rest a few of your own.

Photo via.

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Spankin’ New Headlines

Friday, April 9th, 2010

When senior citizens sign on to tutor kids, everyone benefits. USA Today

The U.S birth rate fell in 2008 by 2 percent, likely due to the economy, but births to moms over 40 are still rising. The Chicago Tribune

Measles outbreak: when not vaccinating your child leaves her vulnerable to a potentially deadly disease. NPR

If 90 percent of moms exclusively breastfed for the first 6 months, billions of dollars and about 900 lives would be saved, according to new research. Yahoo! News

New lead-control regulations are set to take effect this month that have the potential to seriously reduce lead poisoning in kids. The New York Times

Original photo via

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