Posts Tagged ‘ learning language ’

Parents Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, August 21st, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

J&J to Remove Harsh Chemicals from Baby Products
Johnson & Johnson plans to remove potentially cancer-causing and other dangerous chemicals from nearly all its adult toiletries and cosmetic products worldwide within 3 1/2 years. (via MSNBC)

Early Anesthesia Tied to Language Problems in Kids
Babies and toddlers who went under anesthesia during surgery ended up having slightly worse scores on language and reasoning tests as 10-year-olds, in a new study. (via Reuters)

Chickenpox Down 80 Percent Since 2000
Signaling the retreat of a childhood rite of passage, the incidence of chickenpox in the United States fell by 80 percent from 2000 to 2010, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported last week. (via New York Times)

As Circumcision Rates Drop, Costs Increase: Study
As gaps in insurance coverage lead to fewer male babies being circumcised in the United States, related health costs could end up increasing by millions of dollars every year, a new study suggests. (via Reuters)

Cramming May Hurt Kids’ Grades, Study Suggests
High school students who choose to sacrifice their sleep to get extra studying time in may fare worse academically the next day compared with their well-rested peers, new research suggests. (via ABC)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Friday, August 3rd, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Breast Cancer Charity Overstated Screening Benefits, Researchers Say
Researchers say Susan G. Komen for the Cure overstated the benefit mammograms have on survival rates of women with breast cancer. Komen’s messages stated 98 percent of women who get the screening tests survive at least five years, while 23 percent who do not get mammograms survive that long — a difference of 75 percentage points. (via NBC News)

New Pets May Help Autistic Kids Socially
Getting a pet may help children with autism to develop their social skills, if the furry friend is brought into the home when the child is about 5 years old, according to a new French study. The researchers discovered the children showed improvement in their abilities to share with others and to offer comfort. (via Fox News)

Hidden Dangers in Vitamins & Supplements?
According to a new report in Consumer Reports, vitamins and supplements could do more harm than good in some cases. Between 2007 and mid-April 2012, the FDA received more than 6,300 reports of serious adverse events linked to dietary supplements, including vitamins and herbs. (via CNN)

Disharmony in the Land of Nod
A new study suggests that even moderate levels of household conflict can alter basic brain function in infants, leaving them hypersensitive to negative emotions. Researchers found chronic family conflict made infants more likely to have abnormal brain responses to angry speech. (via Huffington Post)

Chile Bans Marketing of Toys in Children’s Food
A new law in Chile aims to take some fun out of fast-food by forcing McDonald’s, Burger King, KFC, and other restaurants to stop including toys and other goodies with children’s meals. The complaint also targets makers of cereal, popsicles, and other products that attract children with toys, crayons, or stickers. (via Associated Press)

Speaking Multiple Languages Can Influence Children’s Emotional Development
Researchers are investigating how using different languages to discuss and express emotions in a multilingual family might play an important role in children’s emotional development. They propose the particular language used when discussing and expressing emotion can have significant impacts on children’s emotional understanding, experience, and regulation. (via Science Daily)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, February 14th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Babies Understand Words from 6 Months Old, Scientists Say
Babies understand basic words at a much earlier age than previously thought, US scientists claimed. University of Pennsylvania researchers found that infants aged between six and nine months can grasp the meaning of common words months before they can speak them.

Minn. School Board Ends Policy Blamed for Bullying
Minnesota’s largest school district has abandoned a much-criticized policy that required teachers to remain neutral when issues of sexual identity came up in the classroom and replaced it with one that’s meant to foster a respectful learning environment for all students, gay or straight, religious or not, liberal or conservative.

Like Mother, Like Daughter: Eating Disorders Run in Families
Research shows disorders run in families; a relative of a person with an eating disorder is ten times more likely to have the illness than someone without a family history of disorders.

Couple Keeps Twins in Yearlong Quarantine
A Kansas City-area couple quarantines their twins for a year to protect them.

Duggars Talk about Their Miscarriage, Next Pregnancy
Despite the pain of her recent miscarriage, TLC reality-show star and mother of 19 Michelle Duggar says she’d like to have more children if she’s able.

Best Valentine Ever? Six-Year-Old Girl with Cancer Gets Date with Justin Bieber
Battling a rare form of cancer, Avalanna Routh scored the most coveted Valentine’s Day date in the world this year.

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‘Um’ and ‘Uh’ Can Help Toddlers Learn New Words

Friday, April 29th, 2011

Mother talking to toddler girlA new study published in the journal Developmental Science reveals that speech fillers such as “um” and “uh,” also known as language disfluencies, may actually help toddlers’ language development.

The research was conducted at the University of Rochester and studied three groups of children, ages 18 to 30 months, who each sat in front of a monitor that tracked the children’s gazes.  Two images were shown on screen, one image of  a familiar object  and one image of a made-up object.  While a recorded voice said short, fluid sentences about the familiar item first, most infants looked at both images equally.  

When the recorded voice then said, “Look at the, uh…,”  most 2 1/2-year-old toddlers recognized the word stumble and looked at the made-up object, expecting to learn something new.  Kids 2 and under rarely picked up on the word stumble.

Researchers aren’t certain how kids understand these disfluencies–whether they realize “um” and “uh” signify a pause in speech to recall the next word or a pause in speech to introduce new words.

Celeste Kidd, the lead researcher quoted on ScienceDaily.com, noted “We’re not advocating that parents add disfluencies to their speech, but I think it’s nice for them to know that using these verbal pauses is OK — the “uh’s” and “um’s” are informative.”

Read more about the research

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