Posts Tagged ‘ learning disability ’

4 Ways to Start Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) for Kids With Learning Disabilities

Monday, April 1st, 2013

Two girls learning in a classroomEditor’s Note: This post is courtesy of National Center for Learning Disabilities (NCLD.org), a non-profit organization dedicated to ensuring success for all individuals with learning disabilities.

Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) are intended to help children with learning disabilities and special education needs reach educational goals more easily, but they’re often a mystery to parents. A recent study found that schools nationwide could do more to explain the IEP process, which are a federal right of every student. Below are 4 pointers on how to start the IEP process:

Make a Request In Writing: A comment or request made verbally in passing to a teacher or school administrator technically didn’t happen. Remember always to place requests for an IEP evaluation or changes to your child’s current IEP in writing, whether by email or letter.  Notify the school administrator in charge of the Committee on Special Education (CSE) in your school district.

Know Your Rights: After you’ve submitted an IEP evaluation letter of request, every school district nationwide is required by law, under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), to respond within 10 business (or school) days. The school must provide you with written documentation explaining (1) the parents’ need for consent to conduct an educational evaluation’ (2) how the a determination of eligibility will be made; (3) the documentation needed to identify the existence of a Specific Learning Disability (SLD); and (4) confirmation that parents are invited to participate in the IEP process.

Be Patient: Your child’s school has 60 business days to complete the evaluation, which includes an interview with parents, a conference with the student, observations of the student, and analysis of the student’s performance (attention, behavior, work completion, tests, class work, homework, etc.). Legally the CSE (or IEP team) must include “you” the parent, plus at least one general educator teacher (even if your child is in one general education class) and one special education teacher in the meeting.

Speak Up: The IEP team is charged with developing, reviewing, and revising your child’s IEP at least once a year by law and more often if you are dissatisfied with your child’s lack of progress. If you’re not satisfied, speak up (and write emails or letters) as often as you need in order to get results! Remember that you are an equal partner with the school in the IEP process, and the IEP document is intended as a flexible, but binding, agreement that guides everyone involved to ensure the highest quality instruction and free ,educational services in the least restrictive environment.

For more resources on IEPs from NCLD.org, check out Tips For A Successful IEP Meeting, Why And How To Read Your Child’s IEP, and IEP Meeting Conversation Stoppers.

 

Image: Concentrated school children being occupied with a task via Shutterstock.

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Wednesday, January 9th, 2013

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Kids on “The Biggest Loser”: Is It Exploitation?
One of the most popular shows on TV, The Biggest Loser, debuted its 14th season on January 6 featuring a new kind of contestant: children.  (via Take Part)

Gates Foundation MET Report: Teacher Observation Less Reliable Than Test Scores
A few years ago, Bill Gates decided to learn more about whether a teacher’s effect on student learning could be measured. For the first time, the randomized trial shows that teachers who perform well with one group of students, on average, perform at the same levels with different groups of kids.. (via Huffington Post)

Review Questions Blood Pressure Tests for Kids
Despite long-standing recommendations that doctors check children’s blood pressure at every office visit, a new review of research says there is not enough evidence to support that guideline. (via Reuters)

Record Number of Misconduct Complaints Are Made Against City School Employees
A record number of allegations of wrongdoing against teachers and other Department of Education workers were received last year by the office that investigates misconduct in New York City schools, according to a report released on Tuesday. (via New York Times)

More Health Harms for Children Exposed to BPA
The latest study shows the compound found in plastic and food packaging can put youngsters at risk for future heart disease. (via TIME)

Chicago Faulted on Learning Disabilities
When Rashaan Payne was 2 years old, his pediatrician noticed that he was not talking at the level of most children his age. After autism was diagnosed, Rashaan began receiving speech therapy once a week at his home on the South Side of Chicago, paid for by the federal and state governments. (via New York Times)

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October Is Learning Disabilities Awareness Month

Wednesday, October 3rd, 2012

Ellen Seidman, who blogs over at To the Max, recently consulted an expert at the National Center for Learning Disabilities (NCLD) to clear up misconceptions and confusion about learning disabilities.  According to NCLD, 15-20% of the U.S. population has a learning disability, a general term for those who may have difficulty learning for any reason.

Recently, NCLD also released results for a survey they conducted — about 2,000 American adults were asked for their views on learning disabilities.  NCLD found that a high number of adults lacked basic understanding of different types of learning disabilities beyond dyslexia.  Instead, most adults associated learning disabilities like dysgraphia (difficulty with handwriting), dyscalculia (difficulty with math), and dyspraxia (difficulty with motor skill development) with an autism spectrum disorder, an inability to make emotional connections, and an anxiety disorder, respectively.  Some surprising survey results included:

  • Over 66% of parents want more information about learning disabilities than schools currently provide.
  • 55% of Americans wrongly believe that corrective eyewear can treat certain learning disabilities.
  • 22% incorrectly believe learning disabilities can be caused by too much screen time; 31% believe a cause is poor diet; 24% believe a cause is childhood vaccinations.

Learn more about the survey results from the infographic below.  All information is provided by NCLD.org.

 

National Center for Learning Disabilities

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Daily News Roundup

Wednesday, June 22nd, 2011

Jack in the Box to stop offering toys in kids’ meals
Jack in the Box, the nation’s fifth-largest hamburger chain, is dropping toys to promote its meals aimed at kids and working on adding healthier menu options to its offerings for children. (MSNBC)

Learning Empathy by Looking Beyond Disabilities
Students at Ridgewood High School were shown photos of young people with genetic disorders — muscular dystrophy, albinism, port-wine stains — and told not to look away. (New York Times)

IUDs officially recommended for healthy women, teens
A female contraceptive device whose reported side effects kept it off the frontline of birth control for years has been formally endorsed for all healthy adult women and adolescents by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. (USA Today)

(more…)

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