Posts Tagged ‘ IVF ’

Parents Daily News Roundup

Monday, October 22nd, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

IVF Linked to More Birth Defects
In vitro fertilization (IVF) is responsible for creating thousands of happy families, but the latest research highlights some of the potential long term risks of the procedure. (via Time)

U.S. Boys Experiencing Early Onset of Puberty
A study conducted by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has documented that boys in the U.S. are experiencing the onset of puberty six months to two years earlier than reported in previous research. (via Science Daily)

Pfizer to Buy Maker of Attention-Deficit Drug for $255 Million
Pfizer Inc said it would buy privately held NextWave Pharmaceuticals for $255 million, gaining access to the company’s attention deficit hyperactivity disorder drug, the first once-daily liquid medicine approved to treat the condition in the United States. (via Reuters)

Simpler Colon Screen May be Enough for Many Women: Study
(Reuters) – Women younger than 70 have a relatively low risk of abnormal growth in the upper part of the colon – suggesting, U.S. researchers say, that many women can opt for less invasive colon cancer screening. (via Reuters)

Troubled Teens Could Benefit from Online Access to Health Records, Say Researchers
Teens who get in trouble with the law could particularly benefit from online health records because they generally have worse health than other adolescents — and no one keeping track of the health care they do receive. (via Science Daily)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, July 12th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Nearly Half of Newborns At Tennessee Hospital Need Prescription Drug Withdrawal Treatment
Out of the 58 babies in East Tennessee Children’s Hospital’s NICU, 23 of them are going through withdrawal from prescription pills, including OxyContin, Vicodin, and methadone. (via ABC News)

Rare Genetic Mutation Protects Against Alzheimer’s
The mutation appears to slow the production of the beta-amyloid protein, long considered to be the cause of Alzheimer’s. Researchers say a genetic test for the mutation is unlikely because it’s so rare and the mutation could be exclusive to the Icelandic population. (via CNN)

Growing IVF Loan Business Helps Families Finance Their Fertility
Many families are turning to fertility finance companies to help fund their IVF cycles when they’re faced with limited funding and their insurance company won’t cover the costs. (via MSNBC)

485,000 High Chairs Recalled After Injury Reports
More than 485,000 Chico Polly high chairs are being recalled after a design flaw led to children getting cuts and bruises. Importer Artsana USA Inc. knows of 21 children getting injured from falling against pegs on the back legs of the chairs, which are meant to store the tray. (via Associated Press)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, July 5th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Mother’s Blood Shows Birth Defects in Fetal DNA
Researchers said they were able to sequence the entire genome of a fetus using only a blood sample from the mother, an advance in the effort to find noninvasive ways for expectant parents to determine if their babies will be born with genetic conditions. (via Fox News)

Smoking Mothers’ Embryos ‘Grow More Slowly’
French academics in an IVF clinic took regular pictures of an egg from the moment it was fertilized until it was ready to be implanted into the mother. At all stages of development, embryos from smokers were consistently a couple of hours behind, a study showed. (via BBC News)

Too Much Coffee Could Hurt Women’s Chances of IVF Success
Women who drank five or more cups of coffee a day were about 50% less likely to get pregnant through in-vitro fertilization than non-drinkers, according to a recent Danish study. The authors noted it was “comparable to the detrimental effect of smoking.” (via TIME)

Company Studying OxyContin’s Effect in Children
The maker of the prescription painkiller OxyContin confirms that a clinical trial is currently underway to measure the opioid’s effects in children. Although doctors can prescribe OxyContin off-label to pediatric patients, the drug — which was overwhelmingly tested in adults — is not approved for use in children by the Food and Drug Administration. (via CNN)

Premature Birth May Raise Risk for Mental Illness, Study Reports
Young adults born very premature — at less than 32 weeks’ gestation — were more than twice as likely to be hospitalized for schizophrenia or delusional disorders, almost three times as likely for major depression, and more than seven times as likely for bipolar illness. (via NY Times)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, June 19th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Sharp Increase in Hospitalizations for Children With Hypertension
The number of hospitalizations for children with high blood pressure more than doubled from 1997 to 2006, according to a new study in the American Heart Association journal, Hypertension. (via CNN)

American Children, Now Struggling to Adjust to Life in Mexico
The English-speaking children of Mexicans returning because of deportations, tougher state laws and unemployment struggle to adjust, often going to schools that are not equipped to integrate them. (via NY Times)

Mayors Back Parents Seizing Control of Schools
Hundreds of mayors from across the United States this weekend called for new laws letting parents seize control of low-performing public schools and fire the teachers, oust the administrators or turn the schools over to private management. (via Reuters)

Taliban Block Vaccinations In Pakistan
The ban, in the North Waziristan region, came days before 161,000 children were to be vaccinated and was linked to fears the campaign would be a cover for American espionage. (via NY Times)

Single Hormone Shot Can Replace Daily Doses in IVF: Study
Women preparing for fertility treatment get a series of daily, sometimes uncomfortable, hormone shots to kick their ovaries into overdrive, but a European review of previous studies suggests that one long-acting shot may work just as well. (via Reuters)

Mom Mistakenly Throws Boy Scout Son’s Life Savings Away
New York mom Dorothy Ferrante thought she was doing a good deed recycling her 12-year-old son’s old computer – until she learned that he’d hidden his life savings of $300 in it. (via The Today Show)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Wednesday, June 6th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Abortion Qualms on Morning-After Pill May Be Unfounded
Some abortion opponents say emergency contraception pills may block fertilized eggs from implanting, but scientists say there is no evidence the pills work that way.

Black Girls Don’t Benefit as Much from Exercise
In a new study of U.S. preteen and teen girls, daily exercise was strongly linked to weight and obesity in white girls but not black girls.

Octuplet Effect: More Choose Single-Embryo Transplants for IVF
The CDC reports that the twin birth rate rose 76 percent from 1980 to 2009 while triples and higher-order multiple births rose a whopping 315 percent. But the tide of multiple births may be ebbing as an increasing number of women are opting to transfer a single embryo during IVF.

New North Korean Leader Stages Massive Children’s Rally
North Korea’s young leader Kim Jong Un on Wednesday made his second speech at a major public event since taking power in December, addressing a children’s rally aimed at winning a new generation’s support.

Despite Obesity Rise, Kids’ Blood Pressure Dipped
The rate of childhood obesity may have soared between the 1970s and 90s, but kids’ blood pressure did not follow the same trend, a U.S. government study suggests.

More Young Americans Out of High School Are Also Out of Work
A new survey finds that those without a college degree have dismal job prospects and considerable obstacles blocking improvement.

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Friday, April 20th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

CDC: 2011 Was Worst Measles Year in U.S. in 15 Years
Last year was the worst year for measles in the U.S. in 15 years, health officials said Thursday.

Birth Defects a Third More Common in IVF Babies
Babies conceived through certain fertility treatment techniques are about one-third more likely to have a birth defect than babies conceived without any extra help from technology, according to a review of several dozen studies.

TV On in the Background? It’s Still Bad for Kids
Too much television can be detrimental for kids’ development, even when they’re not plopped directly in front of the screen.

Domestic Violence May Stunt Babies’ Intellectual Growth
A longitudinal study uncovers the lifelong consequences of child abuse and exposure to interpersonal conflict in the first two years of life.

Controversial Ad Uses Breast-Feeding to Sell Cookies
The latest in the breast-feeding wars comes all the way from South Korea and involves the epitome of American snacktime: the Oreo cookie.

Working Moms’ Challenges: Paid Leave, Child Care
The past week’s political firestorm in the presidential race focused on stay-at-home moms, but two-thirds of women with young children now work. What some feel is being lost in the political debate are the challenges they face in the workplace.

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, March 1st, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Finding Food Allergy Allies
Many parents of children with life-threatening allergies say they are seeing changes at schools, day-care centers and restaurants. This comes after years of being dismissed as overbearing or overprotective in their efforts to insure school lunches and play-date snacks didn’t expose their kids to danger.

Producing More Babies via Automation
In vitro fertilization success rates have been stuck in the mid-30% range for many years. But researchers in the United Kingdom have found they can improve the odds of pregnancy by more than a quarter by using automated equipment for growing embryos.

Is Breast-Feeding “Lewd Behavior”? Angry Moms in Georgia Fight Back
After Nirvana Jennette’s pastor compared her breast-feeding her baby in church to stripping, Jennette got fed up. Now, a nurse-in’s scheduled for Monday, and advocates are trying to overhaul Georgia’s public breast-feeding law.

Surrogacy Gone Wild: British Woman Keeps Giving Babies Away
Pregnancy taxes a woman’s body, so you really have to wonder about the motivation behind Jill Hawkins’ desire to keep signing up for surrogate duty.

Doctors: Don’t Push Little Leaguers Too Much
Baseball and softball are some of the safest sports for children to play, but parents and coaches should make sure young players are properly trained and keep from pushing them too hard, according to new guidelines from U.S. pediatricians.

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Wednesday, October 19th, 2011

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Early Results: A First-Ever Malaria Vaccine Protects Children
A first-ever malaria vaccine tested in children in sub-Saharan Africa cut the risk of infection with malaria by about half, researchers announced in a teleconference on Tuesday.

Senate Saves the Potato on School Lunch Menus
The Senate moved to block an Obama administration proposal to limit the amount of potatoes and other starchy vegetables that can be served in school lunches.

No Proven IVF-Cancer Link, Doctors Say
Dr. George Sledge, co-director of breast cancer treatment at Indiana University’s Simon Cancer Center, says there are no good data to show that IVF accelerates breast cancer.

Parents Urged Again to Limit TV for Youngest
Parents of infants and toddlers should limit the time their children spend in front of televisions, computers, self-described educational games and even grown-up shows playing in the background, the American Academy of Pediatrics warned on Tuesday.

Kids, Teachers Easily Mistake Medicine for Candy
When it comes to telling the difference between candy and some medications, teachers are almost as likely to make an error as kindergartners, according to new research conducted by two enterprising elementary schoolers.

Out With Textbooks, in With Laptops for an Indiana School District
In Munster, Ind., a school system turned to laptops and interactive computer programs in a million-dollar digital makeover that included a rental laptop for every student.

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