Posts Tagged ‘ IQ ’

Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, October 4th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Faster DNA Testing for NICU Babies Means More Accurate Diagnoses
A new genetic test can rapidly screen the DNA of babies in intensive care for about 3,500 diseases. (via Time)

New Child-Proof Spray Bottle Designed to Prevent Chemical Injuries
A new type of spray bottle could prevent thousands of chemical injuries that occur yearly when children get their hands on household cleaners and accidentally spray themselves. (via MyHealthNewsDaily)

Mom’s Blood Pressure May Affect Baby’s IQ
Hypertension isn’t just risky for a pregnant woman, as it can also have lasting consequences for a child’s cognitive ability, a new study suggests. (via CNN)

Do Exercise Programs Help Children Stay Fit?
A new review of the outcomes of a wide range of different physical activity interventions for young people finds that the programs almost never increase overall daily physical activity. (via New York Times)

Common Solvents Tied to Birth Defects
Pregnant women with frequent exposure to solvents at work may be at higher risk of having babies with birth defects, French researchers have found. (via Reuters)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, July 17th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Assault: Children With Disabilities Are More Likely to Be Victims of Violence, Analysis Shows
Children with disabilities are almost four times more likely to be victims of violence than other children, according to a new report commissioned by the World Health Organization. The report, published in The Lancet on Thursday, found that disabled children were 3.6 times more likely to be physically assaulted and 2.9 times more likely to be sexually assaulted. (via NY Times)

Girls as Young as 6 Want to be ‘Sexy,’ Study Says
Most girls as young as 6 are already beginning to think of themselves as sex objects, according to a new study of elementary school-age kids in the Midwest. The study, published online July 6 in the journal Sex Roles, also identified factors that protect girls from objectifying themselves. (via MSNBC)

Women Beat Men on IQ Tests For First Time
New research is providing an answer to the age-old, delicate question: who is smarter, men or women? A new study has come down on the feminine side of that argument, finding that women now score higher on IQ tests than men. (via ABC News)

Tooth Fillings Made With BPA Tied to Behavior Issues
Kids who get dental fillings made using BPA are more likely to have behavior and emotional problems a few years later, according to a new study. (via Fox News)

Cord Blood Stem Cells Restore Toddler’s Hearing
Madeleine, 2, became the first child to undergo an experimental hearing loss treatment through an FDA-approved trial at Memorial Hermann-Texas Medical Center that infused stem cells from her own banked cord blood into her damaged inner ear. Within the last six months, Connor says she’s seen a dramatic improvement in Madeleine’s ability to hear. (via Yahoo!)

Study Links Child Abuse to Home Foreclosures
Researchers found just under a 1 percent increase in the number of general physical abuse cases reported at 38 pediatric hospitals every year between 2000 and 2009 and a more than 3 percent rise in the number of traumatic brain injuries seen in babies. (via MSNBC)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, November 15th, 2011

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Lack of Soap Means Illness, Death for Millions of Children
An estimated 1.5 million children die every year because their immune systems are not mature enough to battle diarrheal and respiratory diseases spread in contaminated environments.

High IQ Linked to Drug Use
A new British study finds children with high IQs are more likely to use drugs as adults than people who score low on IQ tests as children.

Educating Teens, Parents May Reverse Lack of Vaccinations
Many teenagers don’t receive the vaccines they need, but educating physicians and parents could help reverse the trend, a new study suggests.

LAUSD Menu: Parents Love it, but Students?
Move over pizza and mac and cheese. Welcome chili lime chicken wings and Greek salad. These items are part of the new menu at the Los Angeles Unified School District.

Lawsuit: LaBelle Threw Water at Tot in NYC Lobby
R&B diva Patti LaBelle hurled curses — and half a bottle of water — at a woman and her 18-month-old daughter after a dust-up over parenting in an apartment building lobby, according to a lawsuit filed Monday and the family’s lawyer.

Vigilance is Powerful for the Parents of Teenagers
When young people are taking risks and testing boundaries, tough love is just a start.

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Daily News Roundup

Wednesday, February 9th, 2011

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Study Tracks Drug-Related Teen Suicides

Teenage girls are about three times as likely as boys to attempt suicide for drug-related reasons, according to an analysis of emergency-room visits. A government study also found boys are far more likely to attempt drug-related suicide in the month of December, while the suicide rate for girls stays fairly steady throughout the year. (Wall Street Journal)

Higher IQs linked to healthier diets in kids

Plenty of studies have established a link between breastfeeding and intelligence. One-meta-analysis of 20 such studies found that babies who were breastfed got an IQ boost of 3.16 points, on average (even after adjusting for the fact that moms with more education are more likely to prioritize breastfeeding). (Chicago Tribune)

Giving Baby Solid Foods Too Early Linked to Obesity Later

MONDAY, Feb. 7 (HealthDay News) — Babies who were formula-fed and introduced to solid foods before they were 4 months old were more likely to be obese when they were 3, researchers report. (Business Week)

Brain Tumor Risk Drops with More Allergies

There may be one benefit to having a lot of allergies — they may protect against glioma, researchers found.

Patients with gliomas were significantly less likely to report having any allergy (OR 0.60, 95% CI 0.46 to 0.79), a relationship that applied to both high- and low-grade tumors, Bridget McCarthy, PhD, of the University of Illinois at Chicago, and colleagues reported in the February issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention. (Med Page Today.com )

After a False Dawn, Anxiety for Illegal Immigrant Students

MILWAUKEE — It was exhilarating for Maricela Aguilar to stand on the steps of the federal courthouse here one day last summer and reveal for the first time in public that she is an illegal immigrant. (New York Times)

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