Posts Tagged ‘ infants ’

New Checklist May Help Diagnose Autism in Babies

Friday, April 29th, 2011

Doctor Screening BabyBy answering 24 questions, parents and pediatricians now have a better way of determining if a baby is showing symptoms and signs of autism by age 1. 

The Infant-Toddler Checklist was featured as part of a study just published in the Journal of Pediatrics,  ”Detecting, Studying, and Treating Autism Early: The One-Year Well-Baby Check-Up Approach.”  The checklist assesses babies based on emotion and eye gaze, communication, gestures, sounds, words, understanding, and object use.

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego lead the study and created the checklist for pediatricians in the San Diego area to use during babies’ 1-year well-visit checkups.  137 pediatricians participated in the study and used the checklist to screen 10,479 babies. 184 infants who failed the screening were then further evaluated every 6 months until age 3.  The checklist was able to diagnose 75% of the infants with specific problems — 32 infants with autism, 52 with language delays, and 9 with development delays. 

Until now, the American Academy of Pediatrics has encouraged autism screening for toddlers 18 to 24 months, though most kids aren’t diagnosed until they’re older. According to ABCNews.com, Geraldine Dawson of Autism Speaks (which co-funded the research) said, “This study is very encouraging in showing that a quick questionnaire given to parents during a well-baby visit has potential for identifying infants at risk for autism, as well as other developmental delays, at 12 months of age.”

Read more about the autism checklist:

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Look What We Found! Slip-On Winter Booties

Friday, February 11th, 2011

397M_2Now that snowstorms across the U.S. are slowing down, it’s time to stop shoveling the snow and move onto something more fun: playing in it!

We just found Stonz Wear booties, which slip on over your little one’s shoes for playtime in the snow or to keep her dry and warm on those blustery winter days. We love them because they’re adjustable, so they’ll fit from the time your child is an infant until he’s a toddler. They come in a number of cute designs, for about $40 per pair. Our favorite part? They’re machine-washable, so they’ll look like new even after three winters of wear.

Get them at the Stonz Wear web site. If you have an older toddler, you can check out their larger styles here.

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Daily News Roundup

Thursday, November 18th, 2010

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup10 Controversial Toys That Won’t Be On This Year’s Wish Lists
Ten toys that reached the market over the past few years that probably never should have seen the light of day. [Wallet Pop]

Diaper Research Tracks Infant Estrogen Levels
The method, previously used in nonhuman primates, will allow researchers to learn more about the association between estrogen levels in human infants and their long-term reproductive development as well as the development of sex-specific behaviors, such as toy preference or cognitive differences. What’s more, the method will also allow researchers to look at how early disruption of the endocrine system affects long-term maturation, a growing concern among researchers and physicians. [Medical News Today]

Watch Video: The U.S. Gets Low Marks for Preemie Birth Rates [MSNBC]

Highlighting Gender Promotes Stereotyped Views In Preschoolers
In many preschool classrooms, gender is very noticeable – think of the greeting, “Good morning, boys and girls” or the instruction, “Girls line up on this side, boys on that.” A new study has found that when teachers call attention to gender in these simple ways, children are more likely to express stereotyped views of what activities are appropriate for boys and girls, and which gender they prefer to play with. [Medical News Today]

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Daily News Roundup

Thursday, November 11th, 2010

Goody Blog Daily News RoundupInfant foods should be screened for mycotoxins, scientists say - An international team of scientists calls for protecting complementary food for infants in developing countries — especially those where corn is a staple food — against fumonisin, a toxin produced by fungi. Until now, physicians thought the growth retardation of children in those regions was to be blamed on the poor nutritional value of the complementary maize porridge they receive when breast milk is no longer sufficient. But toxins indeed are involved, the scientists report in the journal Molecular Nutrition and Food Research. [Science Daily]

Toymakers jockey for children’s envy, parents’ cash
Toys may be a bright spot during what is predicted to be another tough holiday season for consumer spending. Compared with other retail categories such as luxury and electronics, toys weren’t hit as hard during the economic downturn for one major reason: Many parents will cut back everywhere else before they deprive their children of that Buzz Lightyear action figure or the latest Bratz doll. Plus, toys are relatively cheap. [Bellingham Herald]

Finnish success in tackling childrens’ diabetes - A new Finnish study has found a connection between infants’ diets and childhood diabetes. In the study, carried out over ten years, researchers managed to prevent type 1 diabetes in children with a genetic disposition for the illness. [YLE Finland]

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Are You the Next Great Toy Inventor?

Wednesday, November 10th, 2010

Got a unique toddler toy or product idea? Product manufacturer Sassy Baby is teaming up with invention platform Edison Nation to find the next great toys and products that will promote child development and growth.  The “Sassy Innovative Product Search” contest is on the lookout for innovative toddler feeding items and infant (birth – 6months) crib items that include mobiles, soothers, and bouncers.

The best inventions will appeal to moms, have a high developmental value, and be easy to use.  You’ll need to submit a drawing, photo, or video describing and demonstrating your product by December 20, 2010. The best inventions will be chose and produced commercially.  Plus, winners will receive a  $2,500 advance payment and share sales for up to 20 years. Go to Edison Nation to learn more about being the next great toy and product innovator.  So put your thinking cap on and start inventing!

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Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, November 9th, 2010

Low blood levels of Vitamin D linked to chubbier kids, faster weight gain - Kids who are deficient in vitamin D accumulated fat around the waist and gained weight more rapidly than kids who got enough vitamin D, a new University of Michigan study suggests. [Science Daily]

Fearless children show less empathy, more aggression - Preschool-aged children who demonstrate fearless behavior also reveal less empathy and more aggression towards their peers. This has been shown in a new study that was carried out at the University of Haifa’s Faculty of Education. “The results of this study show that fearless behavior in children can be identified and is related to neurological and genetic predisposition. This type of behavior has less correlation at least in infancy with standards of educational processes or parenting practice,” says Dr. Inbal Kivenson-Baron, who carried out the study. [Medical News Today]

Breastfeeding moms don’t get less or worse sleep than moms who use formula, study finds - Breastfed infants are reported to awaken more often and to sleep less. But does that mean breastfeeding mothers get less sleep, too? Not necessarily, according to the study, “Infant Feeding Methods and Maternal Sleep and Daytime Functioning,” in the December issue of Pediatrics. [Medical News Today]

New research highlights importance of parent-child communication to combat obesity - As part of its proprietary survey program, Student ViewPOINT™, ARAMARK Education, a leading provider of school food and nutrition services, surveyed almost 40,000 middle school and high school students across the country. The research revealed that parent-child communication has a significant influence on the nutrition habits of children. [The Medical News]

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Infant Deaths, Injuries Associated with Nursery Products up Sharply in 2009

Wednesday, November 3rd, 2010

Faulty infant carriers, cribs, high chairs and other nursery products caused a 21% spike in injuries last year, Consumer Ally reported today on WalletPop.com.

Regulators estimated there were 77,300 emergency-room visits related to products aimed at children younger than 5 years old, compared with 63,700 in 2008, the CPSC said in a recent study.

“The numbers in nearly all these categories are far too high,” said CPSC spokesman Scott Wolfson. “It speaks to why we have new rules in place for two juvenile products and why we are pushing so hard to have new standards for cribs in place by the end of this year.”

Infant carriers, car seat carriers, cribs and mattresses, strollers, carriages and high chairs are associated with nearly three quarters of the injuries, with falls the leading cause. Keep up with the very latest on recalls with our helpful Recall Finder and for more details on this story, see Mitch Lipka’s full Consumer Ally report.

Have you had the upsetting and unfortunate experience of dealing with a recalled product for your little one?

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RIE Method Advocates “Do Less, Observe More” Parenting

Monday, November 1st, 2010

ss_ISP2093704Want to raise a peaceful, confident baby? Forget the dangling mobiles, Baby Einstein—even playpens. RIE(short for Resources for Infant Educarers) devotees, including celeb followers such as Tobey Maguire, Helen Hunt, Jamie Lee Curtis, Jason Alexander and Felicity Huffman, would argue their paired-down, empathy-for-baby based method is the way to go, The Daily Beast reports.

Co-founded in 1978 by Magda Gerber and Tom Forrest, a pediatric neurologist, RIE (pronounced like “rye”) is a parenting philosophy that emphasizes treating infants with respect in order to help them grow into well-adjusted, independent individuals. Followers seek to take their parenting cues directly from their babies,  connecting to the actions and feelings a child exhibits in hopes to gain an understanding of what their little one is experiencing. Simple kitchen utensils and household items, for example, are opted for instead of battery-operated devices that are thought to distract rather than engage.

Similarly, a crying baby isn’t immediately soothed but is encouraged to ’let it out’, and asked why he or she is crying. “One of the most common misconceptions is that we just let the babies cry and we don’t pick them up,” longtime instructor Hari Grebler, who teaches in Santa Monica and makes RIE-approved toys and baby furniture, was quoted as saying. “What RIE talks about is, how do we pick them up? Do we just snatch them up from the floor? Or do we go over and talk and try to find out what’s up and tell them, ‘Now I’m going to pick you up.’”

Those dedicated to bringing up their babies under the guidelines of REI often attend REI training courses and meet-up groups. Emma Gray, a Santa Monica, Calif.-based fine art consultant and mother of two, appreciated the way these classes made her more focused and connected as a parent. ”It had a very profound effect …There’s this idea that the children have got to dance, have got to swim. What they need is nature. Basic stimulation from other children. Being outside. Natural stuff.”

This month, the method goes mainstream as RIE teaching materials arrive at 1,700 federally funded Early Head Start programs for families with infants and toddlers nationally.

Would you want your child to participate in these programs? Do you think RIE is a bit too ‘granola’ in its approach or do you see the method as a refreshing departure for our generation of ‘high-achieving super-babies’?

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