Posts Tagged ‘ India ’

Parents Daily News Roundup

Monday, July 2nd, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

As Crops Rot, Millions Go Hungry in India
Every day some 3,000 Indian children die from illnesses related to malnutrition, and yet countless heaps of rodent-infested wheat and rice are rotting in fields across the north of their own country. (via Reuters)

Slightly Early Birth May Hurt Baby’s Academic Performance
Kids who get too early a start at life – even if they are born in the first half of the gestation period associated with “normal term” birth – appear more likely to struggle at reading and math by the time they reach third grade, new research suggest. (via ABC News)

Hitting Your Kids Increases their Risk of Mental Illness
A new study in Pediatrics finds that harsh physical punishment increases the risk of mental disorders — even when the punishment doesn’t stoop to the level of actual abuse. People who experienced physical punishment were more likely to experience nearly every type of mental illness examined. (via TIME)

California Bill Would Let Children Have More than Two Parents
When adults fight over parenthood, a judge must decide which two have that right and responsibility – but that could end soon. California State Sen. Mark Leno is pushing legislation to allow a child to have multiple parents. (via The Sacramento Bee)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, April 5th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Studies Show Genes Play Major Role in Autism
A sweeping study of hundreds of families with autism has found that spontaneous mutations can occur in a parent’s sperm or egg cells that increase a child’s risk for autism, and fathers are four times more likely than mothers to pass these mutations on to their children, researchers said on Wednesday.

Birth Control Shots Tied to Breast Cancer Risk, Study Says
Recent use of the injectable contraceptive Depo-Provera for at least a year was associated with a doubling of young women’s breast cancer risk, a new study has found.

Washington Boy, 9, Writes Apology to Girl He Shot
A 9-year-old boy in Bremerton, Wash. wrote a letter apologizing to a classmate who was seriously wounded after a gun discharged from his backpack, lodging a bullet in her spine.

Maid’s Cries Cast Light on Child Labor in India
A 13-year-old girl who worked as a maid reportedly led a life akin to slavery, in a symptom of India’s growing middle class and its demand for domestic workers, jobs often filled by children.

Frozen Assets: Why American Sperm Is a Hot Commodity
The U.S. is by far the largest exporter of human sperm in the world. Every year tens of thousands of vials go to more than 60 countries.

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, April 3rd, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Moms’ Caffeine Intake Doesn’t Wake Babies
Pregnant and nursing women who consume caffeine aren’t causing their babies to wake up at night, a new study says.

Nearly Half of Pre-Schoolers Not Playing Outside
Nearly half of 3 to 5 year olds are not taken outdoors by a parent or caregiver every day, according to research presented in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine this week.

India Parents ‘Reject Newborn Girl for Baby Boy’
A newborn Indian girl has been left unwanted as her presumed parents seek custody of a baby boy handed to them by mistake, officials say.

Small Bomb Detonates Outside Planned Parenthood Clinic in Wisc.
Police say a homemade explosive device damaged a Planned Parenthood clinic in eastern Wisconsin.

Most Parents of Overweight Kids Don’t Hear It from the Doctor
Just one quarter of parents of overweight kids say they’ve been told by a doctor that their kids weighed too much, according to a new study published in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

NYC Parents Irritated by Ice Cream Carts at Playground
Parents in Brooklyn are talking about trying to ban ice cream carts from a playground, frustrated by having to deal with cranky children when they deny them the cold treats.

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Friday, October 14th, 2011

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Labor Complaint Against Longer School Day to Get Hearing
The Illinois Educational Labor Relations Board announced late Thursday it will hold a hearing in December to review an unfair labor practice complaint from the Chicago Teachers Union over the contentious longer school day issue.

Use of Asthma Controller Meds on the Rise Among U.S. Kids
The percentage of children with asthma in the United States who use a prescription “controller” medicine has nearly doubled since the late 1990s, a new federal government report finds.

Squeezed Out in India, Students Turn to U.S.
The number of Indian students studying in the United States is surging as competition for admission to top Indian institutions has made that goal nearly unattainable.

As Online Courses Grow, So Does Financial Aid Fraud
Online college courses have proliferated, and so have financial aid scams. Investigators are fighting to keep up.

More Children Visiting ERs for Psychiatric Care
A growing number of American children are receiving psychiatric care in hospital emergency departments, particularly children who have no insurance or are covered by Medicaid.

Babies as Young as 15 Months Grasp Fairness
Even at 15 months, when they are just beginning to grasp language and acquaint themselves with their newfound motor skills, babies understand the concepts of sharing and fairness, suggests a new study.

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Daily News Roundup

Monday, October 25th, 2010

British kids log on and learn math- in Punjab:
Three state schools in London outsource part of their teaching to India via the Internet through new online-based company BrightSpark.  Students can now have a one on one tutoring experience at half the price that a British tutor would charge. [New York Times]

Kids’ docs urged to screen new moms for depression: The Pediatrics Academy says that over 400,000 babies are born to depressed mothers each year, and that their conditions can affect their babies as well. Research shows developmental and social delays occur often in babies with depressed moms. [MSNBC]

Raisinets recalled over peanut risk: Nestle has recalled has recalled 10 oz. “fun size” bags sold to Target, Shoprite, and Don Quixote stores because they may contain peanuts. Nestle says the recall only applies to candy with the 02015748 production code and UPC number of 2800010255. [MSNBC]

40,000 drop-side cribs recalled for safety risk: The recalled Ethan Allen, Angel Line, and Victory Land Heritage Collection 3-in-1 cribs have drop-sides that can detach due to faulty hardware or wear and tear, according to the Consumer Product Safety Commission. This can create a gap where young children can be trapped or suffocated. In the past five years more than 9 million drop-side cribs have been recalled and caused at least 32 infant deaths since 2000. [CBS News]

First four months critical to new babies sleep habits: A new study in the journal Pediatrics finds that most babies will sleep five to eight hours per night by their fourth month of life. Many babies will sleep while the rest of the family is sleeping–50 percent of babies at age five months. [Paging Dr. Gupta/CNN]

Celery recall plant awaits results from FDA: The FDA linked four deaths to contaminated celery from a Texas plant. The state health department traced six of 10 known cases of listeriosis during an eight-month period to celery processed at the SanGar plant. On Wednesday the agency shut down the plant and ordered the company to recall all the produce that has passed through the plant since January. [MSNBC]

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Daily News Roundup

Thursday, October 14th, 2010

One in five children meets criteria for a mental disorder across their lifetime, national U.S. study shows: Mental disorders in children are often difficult to identify due to the myriad of changes that occur during the normal course of maturation. For the first time, researchers at the National Institute of Mental Health have reported on the prevalence data on a broad range of mental disorders in a nationally representative sample of U.S. adolescents, which show that approximately one in five children in the U.S. meet the criteria for a mental disorder severe enough to disrupt their daily lives. [Science Daily]

AAP updates guidance to help families make positive media choices: Today, with the ubiquitous nature of media in multiple formats, the definition of media use has been expanded, and kids are now spending more than 7 hours per day on average using televisions, computers, phones and other electronic devices for entertainment. The increasing availability of media, including access to inappropriate content that is not easily supervised, creates an urgent need for parents, pediatricians and educators to understand the various ways that media use affects children and teens. [Medical News Today]

Children’s health insurance coverage varies widely according to U of M researchers: Children’s health insurance coverage still varies significantly at both the state and national levels, according to researchers at the University of Minnesota School of Public Health (SPH). In particular, researchers found gaps in coverage that vary across states by age, race/ethnicity and income. [Medical News Today]

Safe Kids USA launches new national initiative to reduce sports injuries in kids: Safe Kids USA has announced the launch of a new educational effort aimed at helping parents, coaches and athletes reduce the more than 3.5 million injuries that occur in youth sports every year in the United States.[i] The nationwide initiative is the latest focus area for Safe Kids USA and its 600 coalitions, which also works to prevent unintentional childhood injury in other areas including drowning, car accidents and poison prevention. [Medical News Today]

India home to 42% of world’s underweight children: “India is home to 42 percent of the world’s underweight children and 31 percent of its stunted children”, according to “2010 Global Hunger Index” report. [Medical News Today]

Nurses critical in assuring health needs of LGBTIQ youth: Five American teenagers, all bullied because they were gay, have committed suicide over the past few weeks. The deaths have caused a media storm and raised a critical question: Did the social or healthcare system fail these adolescents? “Absolutely,” says Concordia University Professor Deborah Dysart-Gale. “Bullying and such resulting suicides are avoidable. Healthcare workers have tools that can help queer teens – no one needs to die because of their sexual orientation.” [Medical News Today]

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