Posts Tagged ‘ immunizations ’

UN Foundation Announces Shot@Life Campaign to Expand Access to Vaccines

Monday, September 19th, 2011

Shot@Life

Earlier today, the United Nations Foundation announced Shot@Life, a campaign to expand access to vaccines for children in developing countries. “Every 20 seconds, a child dies from a disease that could have been prevented by a vaccine,” said Peg Willingham, Executive Director of Shot@Life.

The campaign hopes to teach Americans about the success of childhood vaccines as a cost-effective way to save lives and, in return, have them advocate for and donate vaccines to children in need.

Each year, 1.7 million children under the age of 5 die from vaccine-preventable diseases, according to the World Health Organization. But vaccines have already proven successful in drastically decreasing the number of deaths from measles and polio. Increased education about and accessibility to vaccines can save the lives of millions of more children.

For more information about Shot@Life, visit ShotatLife.org.

Read more about vaccines on Parents.com:

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August Is National Immunization Awareness Month

Monday, August 15th, 2011

vaccinations-needles-shotsAs your child heads to school, make an appointment with the pediatrician to have her receive the necessary immunizations required by your state.  Vaccines guard your child against illnesses and diseases that may be encountered outside the home.   Parents.com consulted Dr. Daniel McGee of Helen DeVos Children’s Hospital in Grand Rapids, MI to find out what parents should know about immunizations.

Why are immunizations and vaccinations necessary and still important?

The illnesses that are included in the vaccines are real, not just something that occurred in grandma’s day.  According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), there have been more 150 cases of measles in the United States this year, as well as thousands of cases of whooping cough.  Measles outbreaks are occurring more frequently than in previous years. 

What are some diseases easily preventable by vaccinations?  How effective are  vaccinations against these diseases?

Measles, chicken pox, whooping cough as well as certain types of pneumonia and meningitis are the most common vaccine preventable diseases.  Immunized children who come down with an illness will usually have a less severe sickness.

Are there any vaccinations parents or adults should get to protect their family?

The only way to prevent whooping cough in children, particularly those under six months of age, is to make sure everyone who will come in contact with them is immunized.  This is a concept known as “cocooning.”  In fact, 75 percent of the time when an infant comes down with whooping cough, it comes from a parent, sibling, or grandparent.

As kids head to school, are there any new immunization protocols?  What should parents be aware of?

Immunization schedules change each year. Although not a new shot, there is a new recommendation that adolescents receive a booster dose of the meningitis vaccine if they received their first dose before age 16.  Every person aged 6 months and up should also receive the flu vaccine. 

What are the vaccinations all schools require?  What are the vaccinations children should always get?

This varies from state to state.  The best thing to do is follow the Centers for Disease Control guidelines which are endorsed by the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Academy of Family Physicians. With the exception of the HPV vaccine, almost all of the shots recommended by the AAP are required for school.

More About Immunizations and Vaccinations

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Friday, July 29th, 2011

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Judge Strikes Circumcision Ban from San Francisco Ballot
A San Francisco judge Thursday struck a proposed circumcision ban from the city’s November ballot.

Nigeria Parents Risk Jail for Skipping Polio Shots
Officials in northern Nigeria say parents who do not allow their children to be vaccinated against polio now risk jail time for defying a government order. The Kano state government says parents who prevent their children from getting immunized during the four-day campaign will face prosecution.

Sports for Tots: How Young is Too Young?
Though at an age where attention spans are fleeting and coordination hit or miss, parents throughout the nation have signed up their tots up for programs that teach them how to dribble a basketball, shoot a goal and make a pass to a teammate — or at least, attempt to do these things.

Mouthwashing Moms Less Likely to Have a Preemie
Expectant mothers who have gum disease are less likely to deliver their babies prematurely if they use mouthwash throughout their pregnancy, a new study suggests. Pregnant women with gum disease, also called periodontal disease, are known to have more preemies than women with healthy gums.

Finding Strength by Building a Camp
A man with stage 4 colon cancer who was given 12 to 15 months to live went to work building a camp for at-risk and sick children.

Low Birth Weight Babies’ Chronic Conditions Stabilize in Teens
Children who are born at a very low birth weight typically have more chronic health problems than normal birth weight children. While those issues don’t appear to get worse as they become teenagers, a study finds, they may be at higher risk for obesity.

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Sure Shot

Tuesday, April 27th, 2010

This is National Infant Immunization Week, commemorated by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to stress the importance of vaccinations. This year there’s a new component: the Protect Tomorrow campaign. The point of this campaign, launched by the American Academy of Pediatrics, is to remind parents of the diseases that once wreaked so much havoc in the lives of children—ones like mumps, measles, and diphtheria—which are all nearly eradicated, but could easily resurface in a big way if we don’t immunize our kids.

One of our advisors, pediatrician Alanna Levine, M.D., is a big supporter of Protect Tomorrow. “I feel especially connected to this project because my father suffered from polio as a child,” she told us. “His story of being 13 years old and sitting in a glass cubicle, watching the man next to him die, has had a huge impact on me, and I hope it will do the same for parents who have concerns about vaccinating their own children.”

We at Parents stay on top of the research on vaccines. We understand the fears mothers and fathers have. And we realize that all of the conflicting advice out there can be unnerving. But ultimately, we emphasize that all approved vaccines are safe for healthy children. To this end, we’re running a story in our May issue called “Vaccines: Getting to the Point.” It’s a thoroughly reported examination of the theories and myths that still abound on the topic, and it may put to rest a few of your own.

Photo via.

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