Posts Tagged ‘ high-calorie drinks ’

Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, November 2nd, 2010

Kids’ use of electronic media at night linked to problems: More than half of children who use electronic media before bedtime may have mood or learning problems during the day, a preliminary study of 40 young people suggests. The kids in the study, average age 14, were all treated at the JFK Medical Center Sleep Laboratory in Edison, N.J. About 77% had trouble falling asleep; others had daytime sleepiness. [USA Today]

High-calorie beverages still widely available in elementary schools: “The U.S. Department of Agriculture National School Lunch Program has a broad reach, serving meals to more than 31 million students in 2008,” the authors write as background information in the article. However, “different regulations address meals and competitive foods,” such as those found in vending machines and snack bars, in today’s schools and “because children spend many hours in school, changes are needed to make the school environment healthier by limiting the availability of high-calorie beverages.” The Institute of Science and Medicine also recommends that competitive venues like vending machines and snack bars be allowed to sell only bottled water, 100 percent juice and nonfat or 1-percent milk. [Science Daily]

Anti-obesity program for low-income kids shows promise: An approach that attempted to prevent childhood obesity in African-American girls produced beneficial changes in cholesterol, diabetes risk and depressive symptoms but had little effect on youths’ weight, in a trial conducted by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital. [Medical News Today]

Protecting a child’s sleep leads to better quality of life: We all know that pulling all-nighters, being overly caffeinated and overly stimulated have become a part of college life, but the reality is that even as school-age children are dealing with these scenarios. In fact, approximately 70 percent of children under the age of 10 have difficulty falling asleep or have sleep problems that diminish their quality of sleep. This means that children are a large part of the 70 million Americans who suffer from sleep deprivation. [Medical News Today]

Parents’ effort key to child’s educational performance: A new study by researchers at the University of Leicester and University of Leeds has concluded that parents’ efforts towards their child’s educational achievement is crucial – playing a more significant role than that of the school or child. [Medical News Today]

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