Posts Tagged ‘ heart disease ’

Parents Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, February 12th, 2013

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Nearsighted Kids May Get Worse in Winter
For nearsighted children in Denmark, vision deteriorated faster when days were shortest and more slowly during the summer months, according to a new study looking into whether daylight may slow kids’ vision loss. (via Reuters)

Education Content In State Of The Union Likely To Focus On Littlest Learners
President Barack Obama made K-12 education a major component of his 2012 State of the Union Address — so much so that the topic garnered the most traffic on sites like Twitter. But this year, education advocates are expecting something entirely different. (via Huffington Post)

Judge Overturns Arizona Law Barring Planned Parenthood Funding
A federal judge has overturned an Arizona law that sought to block funding through the state for Planned Parenthood’s healthcare clinics because the group also performs abortions. (via Reuters)

Hypertension in Pregnancy Can Predict Heart Disease Risk
A new study from the American Heart Association journal, Circulation, shows women who have high blood pressure during pregnancy may be at increased risk for developing heart disease, chronic kidney disease and diabetes. (via Fox News)

Governor Rick Snyder’s University Funding Plan Generates Criticism
Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder is drawing fire for the way he allocates state education spending in his new budget. (via Huffington Post)

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7 Delicious Foods for Your Kid’s Heart

Wednesday, January 16th, 2013

You may have read the news yesterday that blueberries and strawberries can lower your risk of heart disease by about a third. I thought the study—a joint effort between Harvard University and East Anglia University in England—was totally cool for two reasons: Researchers started tracking the women when they were young moms—25 to 42—while most other work of this kind has been done in older women, and blueberries and strawberries are my daughter’s two favorite foods. Seriously, Katie said to me a couple of weeks ago, “I like strawberries better than candy.” And knowing how much she loves candy, that’s a bold statement!

Last night, I sent a note to one of the study’s authors, Aedin Cassidy, Ph.D., from East Anglia University, asking whether she thought her results applied to kids as well as moms. She responded right away: “This is a very interesting question,” she wrote. “We don’t have data on kids but if you extrapolate from our study, it’s likely that a healthy diet in childhood will also play out to a reduced risk of heart disease later in life.” That’s good enough for me. High cholesterol and high blood pressure, two big-time risk factors for heart disease, are becoming increasingly common in kids. One study published last year found that 24,000 children received treatment for elevated BP in 2006—double that compared to a decade before.

Dr. Cassidy also added that besides the strawberries and blueberries that got all the attention on the news yesterday, eggplant, plums, red cabbage, and other berries (like cranberries and raspberries) are also rich in pigments called anthocyanins that help lower the risk of heart disease and keep blood pressure in check. I’ve found some great recipes for each of them. Dig in!

* Strawberries: Puree berries in the blender for strawberry milk or make this strawberry soup for a Valentine’s treat.

* Blueberries: For baby, consider this blueberry puree while older kids will love these blueberry yogurt pops.

* Eggplant: Watch Disney’s Ratatouille, then make this pasta and eggplant dish.

* Plums: This plum pizza with feta cheese is a great way to work fruit into dinner.

* Red cabbage: Try this recipe for apple and cabbage baby food. For older kids, slip shredded cabbage into sandwiches—they’ll probably like it better than lettuce.

* Cranberries: Both fresh and dried are packed with the healthy pigments. Try these cranberry granola bars and this homemade cranberry sauce (it’s not just for Thanksgiving!)

* Raspberries: Whip up a healthy raspberry sauce to top whole-grain pancakes and waffles.

 

 

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Wednesday, January 9th, 2013

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Kids on “The Biggest Loser”: Is It Exploitation?
One of the most popular shows on TV, The Biggest Loser, debuted its 14th season on January 6 featuring a new kind of contestant: children.  (via Take Part)

Gates Foundation MET Report: Teacher Observation Less Reliable Than Test Scores
A few years ago, Bill Gates decided to learn more about whether a teacher’s effect on student learning could be measured. For the first time, the randomized trial shows that teachers who perform well with one group of students, on average, perform at the same levels with different groups of kids.. (via Huffington Post)

Review Questions Blood Pressure Tests for Kids
Despite long-standing recommendations that doctors check children’s blood pressure at every office visit, a new review of research says there is not enough evidence to support that guideline. (via Reuters)

Record Number of Misconduct Complaints Are Made Against City School Employees
A record number of allegations of wrongdoing against teachers and other Department of Education workers were received last year by the office that investigates misconduct in New York City schools, according to a report released on Tuesday. (via New York Times)

More Health Harms for Children Exposed to BPA
The latest study shows the compound found in plastic and food packaging can put youngsters at risk for future heart disease. (via TIME)

Chicago Faulted on Learning Disabilities
When Rashaan Payne was 2 years old, his pediatrician noticed that he was not talking at the level of most children his age. After autism was diagnosed, Rashaan began receiving speech therapy once a week at his home on the South Side of Chicago, paid for by the federal and state governments. (via New York Times)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, November 15th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Even Moderate Drinking in Pregnancy Can Affect a Child’s IQ
Relatively small levels of exposure to alcohol while in the womb can influence a child’s IQ, according to a new study. (via ScienceDaily)

Pediatricians May Lack Training in Concussion Care
Pediatricians and pediatric nurses often see young patients with concussions, but a new survey suggests they may lack the tools and training to diagnose and treat them. (via Reuters)

Pollutants Linked to Lower Fertility in Both Men and Women
Researchers say that pollutants such as perchlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), industrial compounds and pesticides that are no longer manufactured but remain in older products can still decrease couples’ ability to have children by up to 29%. (via Time)

Kids With Down Syndrome Twice as Likely to be Heavy
More than one in four children with Down syndrome in the Netherlands is overweight, a rate double that of Dutch youth without the developmental disability, according to a new study. (via Reuters)

Enrollment in Charter Schools is Increasing
Although charter schools engender fierce debate, the number of students enrolled increased close to 13% between 2010-11 and 2011-12. (via New York Times)

Early Puberty May Heighten Heart Risks For Women
A new study finds menstruating before age 12 may contribute to a 23% greater risk of developing heart disease. (via Time)

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New Yorkers Say Goodbye to Supersize Sodas

Thursday, September 13th, 2012

“Are You Pouring On the Pounds?” That’s the question posed by advertisements plastered on New York City subway cars. The ads depict sugar packets and beverage containers bubbling over with globs of fat, and caution that excess sugar consumption is linked to obesity, diabetes, and heart disease.

New Yorkers will soon have to settle for chugging smaller sodas. The New York City Board of Health voted today to pass a ban on supersize soft drinks. The controversial ban, proposed by Mayor Michael Bloomberg last spring, imposes a 16-ounce limit on cups and bottles of non-diet soda, sweetened teas, and other high-calorie beverages. The policy only applies to drinks sold at cafeterias, theaters, restaurants, and fast-food joints—meaning that you can still guzzle mega beverages sold at supermarkets or convenience stores. Dairy-based drinks get a free pass if they contain more than 50% milk.

Will the ban shrink our waistlines? Given that beverages are just one component of any diet, it’s hard to tell for sure. But sugar-packed drinks can definitely contribute to weight gain. There are about 240 calories in a 20-oz. Coke, compared to 200 in a 16-oz. one. The difference might not seem significant, but consider this: if you gulp down a soda a day, it adds up to an extra 14,600 calories per year. That’s enough to make me want to put down my straw.

Image: Girl drinking soda via Shutterstock

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, August 16th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Job Losses Persist for the Less-Educated
After suffering the largest share of job losses in the recession, Americans with no more than a high school education have continued to lose jobs during the sputtering recovery while better-educated people have gained millions of jobs, according to a Georgetown University study. (via New York Times)

Blood Type Might Be a Clue to Heart Disease Risk
People who have blood types A, B, or AB have a slightly higher risk of heart disease compared to those with type O, the most common kind, according to research released Tuesday. (via Associated Press)

U.S. Kids Downing More Diet Drinks
The number of U.S. children who drink sugar-free beverages has doubled in the past decade, a new study finds. (via Reuters)

Chemical in Antibacterical Soap Weakens Muscle Function
A new study questions the safety of triclosan, a common chemical in antibacterial products like soap, toothpaste and mouthwash. (via Time)

Children’s Self Control is Associated with Their Body Mass Index as Adults
A new study scheduled for publication in The Journal of Pediatrics finds that delaying gratification longer at 4 years of age is associated with having a lower body mass index (BMI) 30 years later. (via Science Daily)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, July 24th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Survival Rates for Premies Are Better Than Previously Reported
Premature babies are more likely to survive when they are born in high-level neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) than in hospitals without such facilities. Pediatric researchers who analyzed more than 1.3 million premature births over a 10-year span found that the survival benefits applied not only to extremely preterm babies, but also to moderately preterm newborns. (via Science Daily)

Severely Obese Babies: Hearts Already in Danger
Heart disease is normally associated with middle age, but the early warning signs were detected in children between the ages of two and 12. Two-thirds of the 307 children studied had a least one early symptom such as high blood pressure. (via BBC)

Social Deprivation Has a Measurable Effect On Brain Growth
Severe psychological and physical neglect produces measurable changes in children’s brains, finds a study led by Boston Children’s Hospital. But the study also suggests that positive interventions can partially reverse these changes. (via Science Daily)

After 30 Years, Unintended Birth Rate Still Almost 40 Percent
About 37 percent of births in the United States are the result of unintended pregnancies, a proportion that has remained fairly steady since 1982, according to new research from the National Center for Health Statistics, a branch of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (via ABC)

Childhood Obesity Linked to Cancer Risk
According to the American Heart Association, one in three children and teenagers are now considered overweight or obese. There is a growing recognition of health problems associated with extra pounds, including the risk of diabetes, heart disease, and joint and muscle pain. (via Science Daily)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Wednesday, June 13th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News RoundupBoy from Super Bowl Commercial Prepares for Heart Surgery
Max Page, 7, starred in arguably the most memorable commercial from the 2011 Super Bowl: the Volkswagen Star Wars ad. Dressed as Darth Vader, Page attempted to use the Force to control various household items. But now Page will have to channel the Force he used in the commercial as he gets ready to have open-heart surgery to fix a congenital defect. (via The Today Show)

Casey Anthony Does Phone Interview With Piers Morgan
It was almost a year ago that Casey Anthony was acquitted in the death of her 2-year-old daughter, Caylee. Now, for the first time since the trial, Anthony has addressed the charges in a phone interview with CNN’s Piers Morgan. (via CNN)

New Study About Same-Sex Parenting Criticized
Social scientists are criticizing a new study authored by Mark Regnerus, a sociologist at the University of Texas, that claims there are disadvantages for children raised by same-sex parents. (via msnbc.com)

Children and Grandchildren of Older Fathers May Inherit Longevity
A recent study by researchers at Northwestern University has found that kids with older fathers and grandfathers have longer telomeres, which could mean a longer and healthier life. (via TIME)

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