Posts Tagged ‘ health insurance ’

Daily News Roundup

Monday, May 2nd, 2011

Kids only 12 months old can undo carseat restraints
Researchers at Yale University’s School of Medicine found some children as young as 12 months can unbuckle their seatbelts. A majority of kids less than three years old can do it, with boys most often the ones attempting to unhook their seatbelts. More than 40 percent of children who are able to unbuckle the restraints are doing so while the car is moving, prompting many parents to pull over, reprimand and then re-buckle the child, according to the study. (MSNBC)

Even Families With Insurance Put Off Or Go Without Care Because ‘It Costs Too Much To Be Healthy’
In a study to be presented today, at the Pediatric Academic Societies annual meeting in Denver, researchers found that the high cost of health care is deterring parents from taking their children to the doctor or buying prescription medicine; regardless of how much money they make or whether they have health insurance. (Medical News Today)

The Long-Term Metabolic Impact Of Early Nutrition
In a recent study researchers compared growth, body composition, and blood pressure in three groups of healthy newborns. One group received only breast milk for the first four months. The two other groups were randomized to receive either a low-protein formula with 1.8 grams of protein/100 kilocalories (g/kcal) or a high-protein formula with 2.7 g/100 kcal.  They found that nutrition during the first days or weeks of life may have long-term consequences on health, potentially via a phenomenon known as the metabolic programming effect. (Medical News Today)

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Daily News Roundup

Wednesday, November 17th, 2010

Goody Blog Daily News RoundupMore professors give out hand-held devices to monitor students and engage them
Though the technology is relatively new, preliminary studies at Harvard and Ohio State, among other institutions, suggest that engaging students in class through a device as familiar to them as a cellphone — there are even applications that convert iPads and BlackBerrys into class-ready clickers — increases their understanding of material that may otherwise be conveyed in traditional lectures. The clickers are also gaining wide use in middle and high schools, as well as at corporate gatherings. (New York Times)

Preemie births inch down, but still a big problem
Premature births may finally be starting to inch down, says a new report from the March of Dimes. The change is small: In 2006, 12.8 percent of U.S. babies were born premature, compared with 12.3 percent in 2008. Still, that translates into 21,000 fewer preterm births, said March of Dimes president Dr. Jennifer Howse — what she called the first real sign of progress after three decades of rising prematurity. (MSNBC)

Pregnancy not covered by most individual health policies
Individual health insurance policies generally don’t cover maternity care, as a recent investigation by the House Committee on Energy and Commerce reported. In an October memo outlining its findings based on responses from the four largest for-profit health insurers — Aetna, Humana, UnitedHealth Group and WellPoint —the committee reported that most individual policies at those companies didn’t cover most of the expenses for a normal delivery. (MSNBC)

Study: Antibiotics have little impact on child ear infections
Giving children antibiotics for ear infections does little to speed their recovery while raising the risk of some side effects, according to a study published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association. (CNN)

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Daily News Roundup

Thursday, October 14th, 2010

One in five children meets criteria for a mental disorder across their lifetime, national U.S. study shows: Mental disorders in children are often difficult to identify due to the myriad of changes that occur during the normal course of maturation. For the first time, researchers at the National Institute of Mental Health have reported on the prevalence data on a broad range of mental disorders in a nationally representative sample of U.S. adolescents, which show that approximately one in five children in the U.S. meet the criteria for a mental disorder severe enough to disrupt their daily lives. [Science Daily]

AAP updates guidance to help families make positive media choices: Today, with the ubiquitous nature of media in multiple formats, the definition of media use has been expanded, and kids are now spending more than 7 hours per day on average using televisions, computers, phones and other electronic devices for entertainment. The increasing availability of media, including access to inappropriate content that is not easily supervised, creates an urgent need for parents, pediatricians and educators to understand the various ways that media use affects children and teens. [Medical News Today]

Children’s health insurance coverage varies widely according to U of M researchers: Children’s health insurance coverage still varies significantly at both the state and national levels, according to researchers at the University of Minnesota School of Public Health (SPH). In particular, researchers found gaps in coverage that vary across states by age, race/ethnicity and income. [Medical News Today]

Safe Kids USA launches new national initiative to reduce sports injuries in kids: Safe Kids USA has announced the launch of a new educational effort aimed at helping parents, coaches and athletes reduce the more than 3.5 million injuries that occur in youth sports every year in the United States.[i] The nationwide initiative is the latest focus area for Safe Kids USA and its 600 coalitions, which also works to prevent unintentional childhood injury in other areas including drowning, car accidents and poison prevention. [Medical News Today]

India home to 42% of world’s underweight children: “India is home to 42 percent of the world’s underweight children and 31 percent of its stunted children”, according to “2010 Global Hunger Index” report. [Medical News Today]

Nurses critical in assuring health needs of LGBTIQ youth: Five American teenagers, all bullied because they were gay, have committed suicide over the past few weeks. The deaths have caused a media storm and raised a critical question: Did the social or healthcare system fail these adolescents? “Absolutely,” says Concordia University Professor Deborah Dysart-Gale. “Bullying and such resulting suicides are avoidable. Healthcare workers have tools that can help queer teens – no one needs to die because of their sexual orientation.” [Medical News Today]

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