Posts Tagged ‘ gym ’

No Child Left Inside

Friday, May 24th, 2013

Should kids get an hour of gym every day? 

With physical activity as a proven brain booster, the Institute of Medicine is recommending that schools provide opportunities for at least 60 minutes of physical activity each day for students.

Since the passage of the No Child Left Behind law in 2001, 44 percent of school administrators report slashing big chunks of time from physical education, arts, and recess in order to boost classroom time for reading and math. Mandatory PE classes can help lower our nation’s childhood obesity rates, increase brain power, and add a healthy dose of fun to our kids’ school day, experts say.

A recent study by the Delaware Department of Education and the nonprofit Nemours Health & Prevention Services analyzed the records of more than 80,000 Delaware public-school students. It found that the kids who were more physically fit generally performed better on reading and math tests than their less-active peers.

Another study done by researchers at the University of Rome found that the test scores of 8-11 year olds improved by an average of 10 percent when they exercised right before an exam.

The Institute of Medicine recommends that PE be adopted as a core subject.

Do you think PE should be a core requirement?

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New Study: Working Parents Too Stressed to Have Sex

Wednesday, March 23rd, 2011

ss_101704105Do working parents have more stress in their lives than non-working parents? While it’s clear that being a stay-at-home mom or dad is certainly no walk in the park, a new national survey from Care.com implies the answer is ”yes.”

 According to the survey, sixty-two percent of working parents revealed they are too stressed from managing their jobs and families to go to the gym, call a friend, or even have sex with their spouses. 

Another key finding? The majority of those surveyed would be willing to trade in a higher paycheck for less responsibility at work. A quarter of working parents (25%) reported that they would leave their current jobs for less or considerably less money if that would provide more flexibility in their lives.

Results go on to show the issue of childcare as a major stress-inducer. With more than a third (34%) of parents relying on their nannies or babysitters to make their lives run smoothly, 62% find that it is stressful to extremely stressful when a childcare crisis, such as a sick nanny or babysitter or a school closing occurs.  And while more than half (58%) of parents have a childcare back-up plan, only ten percent rely on their employers to provide emergency back-up care as a benefit.

Still, the greatest source of stress for the working parents proved to be the difficult task of managing work-life balance.  More than a third of parents – (35 percent) cited work-life as most stressful while a quarter of parents (24%) felt that finding a trusted care provider for their child is more stressful than keeping their relationship with their spouse happy (18.4%) and excelling at their jobs (11.3%).

“While the White House recently announced the great strides of women in the workplace, this survey shows that the work-life balance for so many working parents remains elusive,” said Wendy Sachs, Editor-in-Chief of Care.com.

 “This survey finds that despite successful careers, our work is impacting our personal lives in unhealthy ways.  Working moms, particularly those with young children, are exhausted and stressed by a workday that for many never ends because we are tethered to technology 24/7,” Sachs said.   “It’s no surprise that moms who are toting buzzing BlackBerries in their bags chock full of work emails, can feel tapped out and not eager for sex. Stress kills the libido.”  

What are your thoughts on this survey? Share your opinions along with the biggest sources of stress in your life and how they relate to being a working or stay-at-home parent (SAHP’s should also be considered a ‘working parents’ in my opinion!). 

Note: The Care.com survey was conducted via an online survey at Care.com among 600 adult parents 18 years of age from February 22 – March 1, 2011.

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Training Toddlers to Be the Next Big Sports Star

Friday, December 10th, 2010

p_101144114Parents aren’t just worried about improving their children’s reading prowess, they’re also worried about improving their children’s athletic prowess.  A recent NYTimes.com article revealed parents are involving their babies and toddlers (from 6 months to 2 1/2) in exercises that develop their coordination, motor skills, agility, core strength, health, and fitness.

Companies are now competing to offer exercise and sports DVDs aimed at young children that show jumping, kicking, and sports movements.  Children-oriented gyms are also offering sports classes, particularly soccer, to improve children’s physical development.  These sports DVDs and classes not only help kids combat childhood obesity at an early age, they can also give kids an advantage later when they play sports in schools.   

However, some pediatricians and fitness experts are skeptical that enrolling toddlers in sports classes can speed up coordination or lead to careers as all-star athletes.  Kids could actually strain muscles or fracture bones at an early age. Plus, other studies have shown that even if kids grow up to play more sports, they may not get enough exercise.  According to Reuters.com, kids on sports teams can spend more time developing skills and strategies than playing the actual sport.  Plus, as more physical education classes and recess are reduced in schools, sports classes are still not enough to provide well-balanced exercise and physical activity.

Still, maybe a little exercise is better than having no exercise at all, and starting at a younge age might develop better health habits.  As a parent, would you enroll your toddler in a sports or gym class?  Would you want your toddler to be the next big sports star? Share your comments below.

More sports features from Parents.com:

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