Posts Tagged ‘ gender ’

The Gender Identity Debate Continues

Monday, June 13th, 2011

kilodavis-princessboyThis past weekend, The New York Times published an article about the gender identity/gender confusion debate that has been an ongoing national focus this year.

While it’s nothing new that little boys (particularly toddlers and preschoolers) “cross” gender stereotypes by wearing dresses, playing with dolls, and wearing neon pink nail polish, what’s new is how parents are handling their kids’ interests. 

Instead of forcing boys to conform to gender stereotypes, more parents are supportive and letting their kids express themselves.  Whether a child really is gay or not or just exploring different interests, parents are keeping an open mind and letting kids grow up confident in their own interests and choices.

As a parent, what are your thoughts?

More about gender identity on Parents.com

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Is Your Baby a Boy or Girl? (Try: Either…or Neither)

Wednesday, May 25th, 2011

gender-symbolsThe first question new parents are asked when they’re expecting a baby is: Boy or girl?

A Canadian couple is challenging society’s idea of gender identity by keeping the gender of their new baby a secret…even after birth.  At four months, Storm is the third child for Kathy Witterick and David Stocker (a teacher at a small, alternative school that focuses on social justice issues), who have two other sons, Jazz (5) and Kio (2).  Despite being boys, both Jazz and Kio were raised without assigned gender expectations or limitations, meaning they’re encouraged to play with boys and girls toys, wear boys and girls clothes (in “girly” colors of pink and purple), and grow their hair long if they choose. 

The immediate family (including grandparents), a few close friends, and midwives know Storm’s true gender, but the parents have decided to keep the baby genderless by avoiding the use of male or female pronouns.  Inspired by a book published in 1978, “X: A Fabulous Child’s Story” by Lois Gould, about a child raised without gender roles, the couple hoped to give Storm a chance to grow and decide on what gender to identify with, without society’s pressure.

While the couple’s decision has caused confusion and criticism (Will Storm feel marginalized later in life? Which public restroom will Storm use? Are the parents pushing their own political and social agendas on Storm?), the debate around gender identity comes hot on the heels of more recent news.  Chaz Bono, formerly Chastity Bono, just released a memoir and a documentary about his decision to become a man through a sex-change operation.  Cheryl Kilodavis, a mother of a little boy who loves wearing tutus and tiaras, was on national news earlier this year after writing “The Princess Boy.”

In a world that delineates between the power of princesses and the strength of superheroes, could the couple’s unique parenting decision succeed in helping society get rid of gender labels and stereotypes?

Read more about gender identity on Parents.com

What do you think of keeping your child’s gender a secret? Would you do the same?

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Watch: ‘My Princess Boy’ on the Today Show

Wednesday, January 5th, 2011

A few months ago, we shared a story about one mom’s decision to let her son wear a princess costume for Halloween.  The mom, Cheryl Kilodavis, wrote and self-published a book titled “My Princess Boy” about her young son’s love for tutus, sparkles, and pink.  Her book has since gained popularity and is now published by Simon & Schuster. 

Below is a clip from Monday’s segment of the ”Today Show” in New York City, where Cheryl and her son (Dyson, now 5-years-old) speak about the importance of acceptance, inclusion, and embracing every child’s uniqueness.  Plus, stay tuned for our own upcoming interview with Cheryl Kilodavis!

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-XBCLGDbhKg

More on “My Princess Boy”:

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Daily News Roundup

Thursday, November 18th, 2010

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup10 Controversial Toys That Won’t Be On This Year’s Wish Lists
Ten toys that reached the market over the past few years that probably never should have seen the light of day. [Wallet Pop]

Diaper Research Tracks Infant Estrogen Levels
The method, previously used in nonhuman primates, will allow researchers to learn more about the association between estrogen levels in human infants and their long-term reproductive development as well as the development of sex-specific behaviors, such as toy preference or cognitive differences. What’s more, the method will also allow researchers to look at how early disruption of the endocrine system affects long-term maturation, a growing concern among researchers and physicians. [Medical News Today]

Watch Video: The U.S. Gets Low Marks for Preemie Birth Rates [MSNBC]

Highlighting Gender Promotes Stereotyped Views In Preschoolers
In many preschool classrooms, gender is very noticeable – think of the greeting, “Good morning, boys and girls” or the instruction, “Girls line up on this side, boys on that.” A new study has found that when teachers call attention to gender in these simple ways, children are more likely to express stereotyped views of what activities are appropriate for boys and girls, and which gender they prefer to play with. [Medical News Today]

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Poll: Should Little Boys Dress Like Girls?

Wednesday, November 10th, 2010

kilodavis-princessboyA hot debate is brewing among parents and among our readers: Would you let your little boy dress in girls’ clothing?

Cheryl Kilodavis is the mother of a 4-year-old boy who loves wearing sparkly and pink dresses, skirts, tiaras, and jewelry.  She wrote and self-published a children’s picture book titled “My Princess Boy,” based on her son, to create a dialogue about traditional gender roles, acceptance of differences, and unique self-expression. Another mom named Sarah blogged about her son’s choice to wear a “female” Halloween costume

We heard from parents like you who commented on the Parents magazine Facebook page and on the Parents Community discussion board.  Here are some highlights from the ongoing debate:

As an educator with a master’s degree in education, a former preschool teacher of 7 years, and a mother to a toddler, it is perfectly normal for a child to play in a way that may not be classified as “gender appropriate.”  Children learn the most by playing with other children, especially in the early years…It is all part of their development. Pretend play is a good way for children to model behaviors they see in their world. - Tracy Seng Wren

I do not approve or encourage my son to dress like a girl or act effeminate. As a father, my role is to teach him the appropriate male gender roles.  I would have no problem with my son cooking, helping with household chores, etc. There is a big difference with that and a boy dressing up as a girl. - Jose Tadeo

What do you think? Take our poll below and read more comments after the jump. 

 

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