Posts Tagged ‘ football ’

Fall Activities To Do With Your Baby

Thursday, October 2nd, 2014

Your fall bucket list (we’ve seen ‘em floating around Pinterest) likely includes a trip to the pumpkin patch, costume shopping, and trick-or-treating (or at least passing out candy with Baby!). However, there are several less obvious to-dos that can be just as fun! Consult our list, then start checking off those boxes. Happy Autumn!

Master the football breastfeeding position Odds are, you plan on catching at least a game or two this season. When you aren’t yelling, “Touchdown!” try out this breastfeeding technique–no tackling necessary.

Cook a seasonal meal for Baby Squash doesn’t just add decorative flair to your kitchen counter, it can also make for a yummy puree! Whip up our recipe and treat your little one to a fall delicacy. Pumpkin puree is also an option!

Browse autumn baby names Whether you’re expecting or just want to imagine your little one’s life as an Octavia or a Juniper, check out these fall-themed monikers.

Think Thanksgiving It’s never too early to start planning your menu! These holiday recipes for Baby’s first celebration incorporate your favorite foods.

Capture her handprint Follow the instructions for this Baby-Handprint napkin, then add a seasonal touch by turning it into a classic turkey!

Football position tips and tricks

How to Do the Football Breastfeeding Position
How to Do the Football Breastfeeding Position
How to Do the Football Breastfeeding Position

Add a Comment

Making the Play with Andrew Luck

Thursday, September 11th, 2014

What do you do with your kids to get active? An NFL quarterback wants to know!

Indianapolis Colts quarterback Andrew Luck is helping launch “Make the Play” with Quaker Oats to help motivate families to eat healthy and get active. Parents can submit their favorite ways to play with their families. The winning family with the most innovative game or original way to be active gets to participate in a “Day of Play” with Luck. Parents caught up with Luck to learn about the importance of kids getting active with their families.

P: What inspired you to get involved with “Make the Play”?

AL: This is my third year getting to work with Quaker. It’s really because we share so much passion for healthy lifestyles and encouraging kids to get outside to play for at least an hour a day, to eat good breakfast, and sleep well. I think those are great messages to get behind. I feel strongly about them and so does Quaker.

P: How did active play influence your childhood? 

AL: It was a big,big part of my childhood. I have three younger siblings, so the four of us were outside all the time after school playing games, making up games. My sister made up a game called “roof ball.” We’d play that constantly. She always beat me in it, and it made me very mad. But we were outside all the time. We’d wait for my dad to come home from work, and he’d take 15, 20 minutes to just throw a football or shoot basketball hoops or kick a soccer ball or play volleyball. That was always a big part of my childhood, and I know it must have helped me with sitting down and doing homework later or falling asleep. It was a great way to use up some energy.

P: What was “roof ball” like? 

AL: “Roof ball” was a game where we’d throw a ball on the roof and the person who caught it got points. I shoulda won, but I rarely did.

P: What are some advantages of children getting active? 

AL: I do think studies have shown that getting active for at least 60 minutes a day helps with concentration and focus, so I think that’s important. Just an active lifestyle is great for health overall.

P: What athlete inspired you as a kid to be active? 

AL: My dad [Oliver Luck] played football in the NFL, and he was a quarterback, as well. He was always an inspiration, and I loved watching Peyton Manning and Steve McNair. I enjoyed watching those guys.

P: How does eating right affect your performance?

AL: It’s a big part of being a professional athlete. To me, breakfast is my most important meal. It’s often the meal you play a game on. I make sure I have oatmeal, milk, and fruit. It’s the fuel you use to hopefully do your best, so eating right is a big part of being a professional athlete. I wish I paid more attention to it earlier in my life.

P: What’s you favorite oatmeal topping? 

AL: Fruit! All types of fruit—berries, especially.

P: What are some ways parents can inspire their kids to get active? 

AL: I always appreciated my dad coming outside and playing with us—or my mom—and being a part of the game we were playing or refereeing it or just being outside. That was fun for us, and it was very encouraging.

P: What are you looking for when judging the “Make the Play” contest? 

AL: Two simple things! One: Involve other people. It’s fun when a bunch of people are playing the game and families. Two: Have fun. Make sure you’re having fun, and that will come through on the videos.

For more information on the “Make the Play” contest, visit QuakerMakeThePlay.com.

Add a Comment

NFL Star Andrew Luck Helps Your Kid Throw the Perfect Spiral

Monday, November 18th, 2013

Football season is now in full swing. Whether your little athlete plays on a team or prefers to watch from the sidelines, you’ll want to encourage a positive attitude towards sports.  We spoke with Andrew Luck, quarterback of the Indianapolis Colts, to get his advice for keeping kids moving and encouraging a healthy lifestyle.

  • Make sure it’s fun. “Even as a professional athlete, if it’s not fun, something is wrong,” Andrew says. He recommends letting your child play as many sports as she wants. “Diversity helps. Playing basketball helped me become a better football player.”
  • Emphasize the commitment. “My parents never forced me to play anything, but if I started a season of any sport, I had to finish it out,” he says.
  • Help your child prepare correctly. That means fueling up on the proper foods, getting enough sleep, and understanding what the body needs.
  • Practice, practice, practice! “I used to throw for hours with my dad after work,” Andrew says. “But on occasions where he didn’t have a lot of time, we’d just do five minutes. Even that helps.”

Andrew also gave us his tips for throwing the perfect spiral. Perfect the move yourself, and then teach your little one:

          1. Grip the football correctly. Hold the ball so that your ring and little finger are across the laces and your thumb is underneath. Your thumb and index finger should make an “L” shape. Don’t grip the ball too tightly–you should hold the football firm, but it should still be moveable and comfortable in your palm.
          2. Position your body. Face 90 degrees away from your target and turn your hips to the side you throw with. Keep your front shoulder pointed at your target.
          3. Keep it by your ear as you prepare to throw. This will keep the ball at the proper height.
          4. Release the ball with your fingertips. As the football leaves your hand, it should only touch your fingertips. The last part of your body to touch the football should be your index finger, giving it a nice spin.
          5. Practice makes perfect. Play a game of catch with your child, and you’ll both get better through repetition.

Want to win a $15,000 grant for your school? Andrew has teamed up with Quaker Oats and Fuel Up to Play 60 for the Make Your Move video contest. Film and submit a video of students showcasing how they are active by November 27, and your school could win all sorts of great prizes! Check out the video below for more details.

Add a Comment

Sports Gear Up to 50% Off

Monday, August 26th, 2013

We know that your kid is a star on the soccer pitch. Or on the football field. Or on the basketball court. But even if an athletic scholarship doesn’t seem in the cards, keep him busy this fall sports season — and save yourself up to 50 percent off retail prices — with sporty gear from Shop Parents.

• Help your little Mia Hamm perfect her kick with a Mikasa soccer ball and adidas soccer cleats.

• It’s never to early to work on his spiral. This beginner’s football and receiver glove set is ideal for small hands.

• At 19 inches in length, Prince AirO Scream is the perfect starter tennis racquet for 3-5 year olds.

Add a Comment

Parents Daily News Roundup

Monday, May 20th, 2013

Childhood ADHD tied to obesity decades later
Boys who are diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in elementary school are more likely to grow up to be obese adults than those who don’t have the condition, a new study suggests. (via Reuters)

Newer whooping cough vaccine not as protective
A newer version of the whooping cough vaccine doesn’t protect kids as well as the original, which was phased out in the 1990s because of safety concerns, according to a new study. (via Reuters)

Home visiting programs are preschool in its earliest form
Through programs across the country, nurses, social workers or trained mentors offer support to new or expectant parents and impart skills to help them become better teachers for their children. (via Washington Post)

City closure of Cobble Hill preschool means kids are having ‘classes’ in parks, museums as parents fume
The Linden Tree Preschool is run by the Episcopal Diocese of Long Island. The city closed it on May 9, saying it did not have permits for infants or toddlers. Since then, parents have taken their kids to the park and other field trips where teachers have been instructing the kids. (via NY Daily News)

USA Football health and safety survey shows few youth concussions
Fewer than 4 percent of youth players surveyed in a USA Football-sanctioned study suffered concussions in the 10 leagues examined. (via Fox News)

Add a Comment

Would You Recognize Your Kid’s Concussion?

Tuesday, September 25th, 2012

Chris Coyne was used to getting pummeled on the football field—he thought that taking a beating was just part of the game. He refused to be sidelined by a few nasty bumps. But after sustaining numerous head injuries, the Yale university student found himself unable to take notes in class or remember where he was going. Like lots of young sports fanatics, Chris wasn’t happy to sit on the bench: he just wanted to get back in the game as soon as possible. More than 50% of sports concussions go unreported, partially because young athletes don’t want to pass up playing time. Chris continued to play with his concussion, and his brain hadn’t recovered from all the times it had slammed against his skull. Ultimately, he had to give up football for good. “I wish I knew then what I know now about concussions and injuries,” he says. “If I did, I would still be playing.”

Experts estimate that there are between 1.6 and 3 million sports-related concussions among children and adults every year. Even if your kid’s not an athlete, you should still make sure you can recognize the symptoms of a concussion. Falls are the main cause of brain injuries in kids under age 10; your tot’s tumble could be more serious than you think. Whenever your kid bangs his head, watch out for these red-flag symptoms: headache, fatigue, balance problems, vomiting, drowsiness, memory and concentration issues, irritability and sadness, and sleep disturbances. If you suspect that your child has a concussion, get her checked out by a doc right away. Though many of these injuries are easily treated with rest, others require surgery to reduce swelling and decrease the risk of long-term damage.

Now, Chris works to raise awareness about concussions, and remind young players how important it is to let themselves rest and recover following an injury.

Check out this video about Chris’s story, which was produced by Choices, a Scholastic magazine for students.

Image: Boy in football helmet via Shutterstock

Add a Comment

Concussions: What Every Parent Needs to Know

Wednesday, September 5th, 2012

FootballEditor’s Note: This is a guest post written by Lambeth Hochwald, a writer for Parents magazine and Parents.com.  She recently attended the National Football League (NFL) Youth Health and Safety Luncheon in New York City to learn more about how to prevent and treat concussions.

Concussions are, without a doubt, on the top 10 list of things parents worry about. This brain injury is caused by a blow to the head or the body from hitting another player, a hard surface (such as the ground), or a piece of equipment (such as a lacrosse stick or hockey puck).

With 38 million kids participating in sports each year in the U.S. and 3 million youth football players, the risk of a concussion isn’t rare. In fact, it’s been estimated that there are 1.6 to 3 million sports- and recreation-related concussions among children and adults every year.

Thankfully, our concussion awareness is evolving. Last year, 30 NFL teams hosted health and safety events for community members and the NFL has also partnered with organizations such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to educate youth coaches, players, and parents on how to prevent, identify, and properly treat a concussion.

“We know that a concussion changes the brain’s electrochemical ‘software’ function,” said Gerard Gioia, Ph.D., division chief of neuropsychology at Children’s National Medical Center in Washington, D.C.  “It produces physical, cognitive, and emotional signs and symptoms that can last hours, days, or even months.”

Here are seven things you need to know about concussions:

  • Know the signs. Concussions can lead to physical symptoms, including headache, fatigue, balance problems, vomiting, and drowsiness; cognitive symptoms, including memory and concentration issues; emotional symptoms, including irritability and sadness and sleep disturbances.
  • Know the risks. Bicycle accidents are the number one reason kids ages 19 and younger are treated for a concussion in the emergency room. In kids who are 10 and under, concussions tend to occur after a bicycle accident or a fall at the playground.
  • Know about helmets. Helmets don’t prevent concussions, but they do prevent severe brain injury and skull fractures. Make sure your child is wearing a helmet that meets U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission standards (the label inside should include the certification) and that fits properly. “A haircut can affect how a helmet will fit,” added speaker Scott Hallenbeck, executive director of USA Football.
  • Know that concussions are often an ‘invisible’ injury. Because more than 90 percent of sports-related concussions occur without losing consciousness, it’s up to coaches, teammates, parents, and onlookers to recognize what to do when a child has experienced this trauma.
  • Know the risky sports/positions. Head injury risks are higher in tackle football and soccer than in other sports. There are also certain positions on a team that can also raise risks. For example, your child is more likely to receive a concussion if she is a baseball catcher or a soccer and hockey goalie.
  • Know the CDC is on it. The CDC’s “Heads Up” awareness program and Facebook page provide ample information about concussions for health-care professionals, parents, and coaches. Concussion fact sheets are available as clipboard stickers, magnets, and posters for young athletes. These can be ordered in bulk for your child’s school.
  • Know that it’s imperative for your coach to be trained. The CDC offers online training for youth and high school coaches. Be sure your child’s coach is up-to-date on the latest concussion prevention and treatment information. Ask about his or her experience — your child is counting on you.

Parents should stay vigilant from the sidelines. If you suspect that a coach is continuing to keep a child on the field after an injury, speak up. Playing or practicing with concussion symptoms is dangerous and can lead to longer recovery and a delay in your child’s return to the sport.  “Toughing it out” is unacceptable. As NFL commissioner Roger Goodell says, “It’s not cool to be tough when it comes to your head.”

More information on head injuries:

 

Image: American Football on the Field via David Lee/Shutterstock

Add a Comment

Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, December 22nd, 2011

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Wal-Mart Pulls Formula After Baby’s Death
Wal-Mart has pulled a batch of powdered infant formula from more than 3,000 of its stores nationwide after a Missouri newborn who was given the formula became gravely ill with a suspected bacterial infection and died after being taken off life support, the retailer said Wednesday.

Anti-AIDS Virus Drug Expanded to Include Children, Teens
Approval for the HIV drug Isentress (raltegravir) has been expanded to include children and adolescents ages 2-18, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said Wednesday.

Twins Born in Brazil with Two Heads, One Heart
Conjoined twins have been born in Brazil with two heads, two functioning brains and two backbones – but a single heart.

Study Links Winning Football and Declining Grades
A University of Oregon study says alcohol consumption and celebrating increased and studying decreased when a team fared well, resulting in lower grade-point averages.

NORAD Santa Trackers Stand By for Another Big Day
Santa already is piling up big numbers on social networking sites this season, so the volunteer Santa-trackers at NORAD are bracing for tens of thousands of calls and emails when their operations center goes live on Christmas Eve.

Add a Comment