Posts Tagged ‘ food allergies ’

Parents Daily News Roundup

Friday, June 8th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Report: 16 Percent of US Teens Have Considered Suicide
Nearly 16 percent of high school teens nationwide admitted they had considered suicide within the previous year, according to an annual survey published Thursday by The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Food Allergies More Common in City Kids
Researchers found that the share of children with any type of food allergy was 9.8 percent in cities, 7.2 percent in suburban areas, and 6.2 percent in rural areas.

How 11 New York City Babies Contracted Herpes Through Circumcision
An ultra-Orthodox Jewish circumcision ritual is found to cause neonatal herpes infections in newborns in New York City, prompting health officials to encourage parents to consider the health risks of the practice.

UNICEF Targets Deadly Diarrhea, Pneumonia in Poor Kids
Concerted efforts to control diarrhea and pneumonia, the biggest killers of children under the age of five, could save the lives of up to 2 million of the world’s poorest children each year, the United Nations Children’s Fund said on Friday.

More Teens Smoke Pot than Cigarettes, Says CDC Survey
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Thursday that 23 percent of high school students said they recently smoked marijuana, while 18 percent said they had puffed cigarettes.

Mom Goes After Stroller Thief, Busts Million-Dollar Crime Ring
Don’t mess with mom. That’s the moral of this awesome story about a Chicago mom who went after the guy who stole her stroller and ended up uncovering a huge crime ring.

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, March 1st, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Finding Food Allergy Allies
Many parents of children with life-threatening allergies say they are seeing changes at schools, day-care centers and restaurants. This comes after years of being dismissed as overbearing or overprotective in their efforts to insure school lunches and play-date snacks didn’t expose their kids to danger.

Producing More Babies via Automation
In vitro fertilization success rates have been stuck in the mid-30% range for many years. But researchers in the United Kingdom have found they can improve the odds of pregnancy by more than a quarter by using automated equipment for growing embryos.

Is Breast-Feeding “Lewd Behavior”? Angry Moms in Georgia Fight Back
After Nirvana Jennette’s pastor compared her breast-feeding her baby in church to stripping, Jennette got fed up. Now, a nurse-in’s scheduled for Monday, and advocates are trying to overhaul Georgia’s public breast-feeding law.

Surrogacy Gone Wild: British Woman Keeps Giving Babies Away
Pregnancy taxes a woman’s body, so you really have to wonder about the motivation behind Jill Hawkins’ desire to keep signing up for surrogate duty.

Doctors: Don’t Push Little Leaguers Too Much
Baseball and softball are some of the safest sports for children to play, but parents and coaches should make sure young players are properly trained and keep from pushing them too hard, according to new guidelines from U.S. pediatricians.

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Friday, January 6th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Big Study Links Good Teachers to Lasting Gain
Elementary- and middle-school teachers who help raise their students’ standardized-test scores seem to have a wide-ranging, lasting positive effect on those students’ lives beyond academics, including lower teenage-pregnancy rates and greater college matriculation and adult earnings, according to a new study that tracked 2.5 million students over 20 years.

Students of Online Schools Are Lagging
The number of students in virtual schools run by educational management organizations rose sharply last year, according to a new report being published Friday, and far fewer of them are proving proficient on standardized tests compared with their peers in other privately managed charter schools and in traditional public schools.

Virginia First-Grader Dies from Allergic Reaction at School
The death of a 7-year-old Virginia girl from an apparent allergic reaction is raising new questions about how schools and parents handle potentially life-threatening conditions.

ADHD Drug Shortage Pushes Parents to Seek Substitutes
If the current shortage of some drugs used to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has left you searching for something else for your child to take, experts suggest you choose a substitute carefully because the effects of these medications can vary widely.

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Wednesday, August 17th, 2011

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Schools Restore Fresh Cooking to the Cafeteria
When classes start on Thursday, the district will make a great leap forward — and at the same time back to the way it was done a generation ago — in cooking meals from scratch.

More Unwed Parents Live Together, Report Finds
The number of Americans who have children and live together without marrying has increased twelvefold since 1970, according to a report released Tuesday. The report states that children now are more likely to have unmarried parents than divorced ones.

Study: 1 in 5 American children lives in poverty
Researchers find 14.7 million children were poor in 2009, 2.5 million more than in 2000.

Kids with nut allergies feel teased, excluded
According to a new study conducted in the U.K., families with children who are living with this potentially life-threatening condition often feel isolated, stigmatized, or unfairly excluded from activities, due to the allergies.

More Kids Hospitalized for Flu, Skin Infections
There was a dramatic increase in the number of children’s flu-related hospital stays in the United States between 2000 and 2009, a federal agency says.

Epileptic boy’s book helps raise money for seizure dog
Evan Moss, 7, wrote ‘My Seizure Dog,’ which has earned enough in donations to help buy a service dog for himself — and four more kids.

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Peanut Allergies: What’s the Best Treatment?

Tuesday, March 8th, 2011

peanuts-shellsThe recent Skippy peanut butter recall serves as a reminder that peanuts are still a problem in the U.S., in more ways than just salmonella.

Food allergies among children are actually increasing in the United States, the most common being the peanut allergy.  Peanut allergies are the most dangerous, since often breathing or eating just a small amount of peanuts could cause fatal reactions such as anaphylactic shock and death.

While most children grow out of certain food allergies by the time they are in their teens, some have worsening allergies or later develop certain allergies.  In a recent New Yorker article, most doctors have commonly believed that children are less likely to develop food allergies if they are not exposed to certain foods as babies.  Those with food allergies have to avoid certain foods for life, reading labels carefully and asking about ingredients, since no other particular treatments are available.

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Daily News Roundup

Wednesday, December 1st, 2010

DNA spit test springs girl, 12, from scoliosis brace
New research published in the journal Spine reports that the test is 99 percent accurate in predicting which sufferers of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis, or AIS, are least likely to develop curves serious enough to require surgery. (MSNBC)

Lowe’s recalls 11 million blinds for strangulation risk
Lowe’s Stores are recalling about 11 million Roman shades and roll-up blinds after reports that two young children nearly strangled in the window coverings, the Consumer Product  Safety Commission announced today. (MSNBC)

How much vitamin D is enough? Report sets new levels
For the past few years vitamin D has been the “it” vitamin, with studies wildly trumpeting the supplement’s role in strengthening bones, reducing the risk of some cancers, heart disease, along with fighting autoimmune diseases and diabetes. But long-awaited new dietary guidelines say there’s no proof that megadoses of the “sunshine vitamin” prevent cancer, diabetes or other conditions. (MSNBC)

Most meds for kids have inaccurate dosing

Researchers looked at 200 of the top-selling nonprescription liquid medications on shelves and found that nearly all had inconsistent directions: The labels on the devices for measuring doses didn’t match up with the dosing instructions. (MSNBC)
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Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, November 30th, 2010

AAP Clinical Report: Children’s Eating Disorders On The Rise
In the past decade, a growing number of children and adolescents have been diagnosed with eating disorders. In a new clinical report from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), “Identification and Management of Eating Disorders in Children and Adolescents,” published in the December 2010 issue of Pediatrics (published online Nov. 29), it is estimated that 0.5 percent of adolescent girls in the United States have anorexia nervosa, and 1 percent to 2 percent meet criteria for bulimia nervosa. [Medical News Today]

AAP Report: Managing Food Allergies At School
Food allergy is estimated to affect roughly 1 in 25 school-aged children and is a common trigger of anaphylaxis, a severe, potentially fatal, systemic allergic reaction. Studies of children with food allergy indicate that 16 percent to 18 percent have had a reaction in school. In a new clinical report, “Management of Food Allergy in the School Setting” in the December 2010 issue of Pediatrics (published online Nov. 29), the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) gives guidance on managing food allergies at school and on the prevention and treatment of food-induced anaphylaxis. [Medical News Today]

Elevated Blood Pressure Suffered By Up To 8 Percent Of Canadian Children
“We blame kids for being fat, we blame kids for being inactive, we blame kids not eating right or the families for not feeding their kids right,” says Terrance Wade, the Canada Research Chair in youth and wellness at Brock University. “But a lot of these things are not based on individual choices because your life choices and such are constrained by your life chances.”  [Medical News Today]

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Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, November 16th, 2010

Goody Blog Daily News RoundupParents Are Junkies
In the last few months, parents and researchers have been at war. Evidence has piled up to show that becoming a parent does not make people happier; it makes them unhappier. [Slate]

Early Puberty: How It Could Affect a Child’s Health
Puberty can be an awkward time in any child’s life, but early puberty is even more challenging. Imagine going through those changes before anyone else understands them. [WLTX]

fMRI Predicts Outcome To Talk Therapy In Children With An Anxiety Disorder
A brain scan with functional MRI (fMRI) is enough to predict which patients with pediatric anxiety disorder will respond to “talk therapy,” and so may not need to use psychiatric medication, say neuroscientists from Georgetown University Medical Center. [Medical News Today]

Even Short-Term Poverty Can Hurt Kids’ Health
Being poor for even a short period of time can have lasting health implications for children, according to a new report by the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. 15.5 million children are living in poverty in the United States, that’s one in five children according to the Census Bureau. [CNN Health]

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