Posts Tagged ‘ flu ’

Daily News Roundup

Thursday, December 16th, 2010

SIDS Spikes on New Year’s Day
Not a happy holiday thought, but an important one: The number of babies who die of SIDS, or sudden infant death syndrome, surges by 33 percent on New Year’s Day. The suspected reason? Alcohol consumption by caretakers the night before. (Science Daily)

Most Young Children Consume Caffeine Each Day
A new U.S. study finds that 75 percent of children consume caffeine daily, largely through sodas. And the more caffeine they consumed, the less they slept. (US News)

Get a Head Start on New Year’s Resolutions
Nintendo and the American Heart Association have teamed up for the “12 Days of Getting Active,” a series of daily tips to make it easy for people to get active during the dessert-enticing holiday season. A recent survey found that 68 percent of people who play active-play video games start becoming more physically active in real life. (Activeplaynow.com)

Humana Foundation Awards Grants To Combat Childhood Obesity
Humana Inc. (NYSE: HUM) and The Humana Foundation announced today that five U.S. nonprofit organizations will receive a total of $212,000 to combat childhood obesity, a serious public health crisis in the U.S. These grants are a part of The Humana Foundation’s 2010 Future Without Childhood Obesity initiative. Humana recognizes that childhood obesity carries with it significant consequences – related medical costs have reached $14 billion per year and children are now being diagnosed with adult weight-related diseases, like type 2 diabetes, that significantly threaten quality of life.  (Medical News Today)
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Let’s Talk About Drugs

Monday, November 15th, 2010

Pop quiz for you:

Which of these conditions are not helped by antibiotics?

A. Bronchitis

B. Flu

C. Colds

D. Non-strep sore throats

The answer is: It’s a trick question—none of those ailments warrant antibiotics, because they’re all caused by viruses, and viruses don’t respond to antibiotics. In fact, if you take the drugs, not only will you feel no better, you’ll just set yourself up for possible failure later on, when you have an illness that really could be helped by the meds.

Antibiotic resistance is on its way to becoming one of the world’s biggest public health threats—it’s estimated that roughly half of antibiotics are unnecessarily prescribed—and this is why the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has designated November 15 to 21 its third annual “Get Smart About Antibiotics Week.”

The CDC breaks down the illnesses that benefit from antibiotics and the ones that don’t here. Even if you think you know this info already, it’s worth taking a peek to make sure you’ve got all the facts.

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Are You Getting the Flu Shot?

Thursday, October 14th, 2010

If you’re pregnant, doctors say you should. Last year’s swine flu epidemic brought extra attention to the need for expecting women to get the shot, but even though the flu fuss has died down, don’t think you can get away without a jab this year; experts warn that any kind of flu is risky if you’re pregnant. Just keep in mind that while the influenza shot is safe during any trimester of pregnancy, the nasal spray version–FluMist, which is made from a live virus–should be avoided (but is okay if you’re breastfeeding). If vaccinated, you’ll not only protect yourself from getting sick, but you’ll also pass on your immunity to your baby to protect her until she’s old enough to get the shot.

Have you made an appointment for your flu shot yet?

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Brandi Chastain Fights the Flu

Friday, October 1st, 2010

Chastain playing soccer with her son Jaden.Brandi Chastain, Olympic and World Cup champion soccer star and mother of two, gives tons of high-fives to kids’ germ-covered hands, so she knows the importance of washing hands when it comes to flu prevention. This year she’s one of the spokespeople for “When Will You Pick?” as in, which day you’ll pick to get your flu vaccination.

 When we spoke to Chastain, she talked about her own experience with the vaccine last year. She allowed her 3-year-old son (pictured with Mom on the right) to choose between the shot and the nasal spray version. In a not-shocking twist, he picked the spray. “I think giving him a choice kind of empowered him, like was taking care of fighting the germs,” Chastain says. However, not everyone is eligible to receive Flu-Mist. Click here for more information.

 Chastain keeps herself and her family healthy not only through vaccination, but also by teaching them healthy practices like sneezing into elbows, exercising regularly and eating nutritiously. They live by the motto “Grow big and strong.”

 This Saturday, Chastain will play her retirement game at Buck Shaw Stadium at Santa Clara University in Santa Clara, California. Proceeds from the game will benefit her Reach uP! Foundation, an organization that encourages healthy lifestyles for girls. Chastain invites you, our Goody Blog readers, to join in on the fun. Don’t forget to wash your hands before you give her that high-five!

 

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Natural Remedy for Allergies and Colds

Friday, May 16th, 2008

NasopureIt’s been a brutal allergy season, and now I’ve also got a cold. So I decided it was time to try Nasopure, a "nasal wash system" that literally cleans the inside your nose with salt water to loosen stuffiness and flush out pollen, dust, bacteria, and viruses. This concept has been getting a lot of buzz lately. A recent study found that regularly washing your nose reduces the length of colds and can actually prevent them, and Dr. Mehmet Oz demonstrated the use of the Neti Pot on Oprah. But Nasppure, developed by Dr. Hana Solomon, a pediatrician who has been recommending this for 20 years, is much easier to use. Watch a video here of a 4-year-old using it. And she now makes a smaller version called Little Squirt to go for children as young as 2. "The saline solution makes thick mucus thinner so it’s easier to blow out, and it also unplugs the opening to the sinuses so they can drain out," she explained to me this morning. It’s also helpful for children with asthma (whose symptoms are often worsened by allergens and air pollution), and those who are prone to getting ear infections after a cold (ear infections typically happen when mucus plugs the opening to the Eustachian tubes, which connects the back of the throat to the middle ear). You can keep it in the bathtub, and let your child get used to playing with it before using it.

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