Posts Tagged ‘ Fertility ’

How Many Kids? Conflicting Happiness Arguments

Friday, April 8th, 2011

How many kids to have? That’s not a small or inconsequential question for those who are blessed to be able to make that decision. Two voices in the news this week offer conflicting advice to those of us wondering what the right balance is when it comes to the size of our brood.

The first, a study commissioned by the website Bounty.com, found that of all possible combinations of number and gender of kids, having two daughters makes for the most happy and peaceful family life. According to the Telegraph newspaper:

The results show of all the variations, two girls make for the most harmonious family life as they are unlikely to fight, will play nicely and are generally a pleasure to be around.

It also emerged two girls rarely annoy their parents, make limited noise, often confide in their parents and are unlikely to wind each other up or ignore each other.

By contrast, doubling the number of daughters is likely to lead to a whole world of pain, the report found.

As the father of the two most awesome girls on earth (pictured above) and the husband of a woman who is one of four daughters, I am particularly intrigued by these findings. My younger daughter, being an infant, is too young to prove or disprove the theory–there’s no fighting…yet.

What does this mean for any future deliberations on whether to have more kids? Not sure it would impact my thinking, especially after reading about a newly published book, “Selfish Reasons to Have More Kids,” by Bryan Caplan, an economist. (more…)

Add a Comment
Back To GoodyBlog

Daily News Roundup

Monday, November 1st, 2010

IPad opens world to a disabled boy: Owen Cain, seven years old, has suffered from a debilitating motor-neuron disease since infancy. By chance, Owen gravitated toward his nurse’s IPad and instantly was able to use it without complication.   This is the first device that has enabled Owen and many others disabled young ones to use actively without assistance. [New York Times]

Pregnancy less likely when dad is over weight: Dr. Zaher Merhi, New York, concluded that among couples using assisted reproductive technology the male’s weight does influence the outcome.  Every 5-unit increase in the father’s BMI was associated with a 28 percent decrease in the likelihood of clinical pregnancy. [ABC News]

Obama’s administration’s sex-ed program criticized by both sides of abstinence debate: After declining for years the teen pregnancy rate has increased again.  $110 million dollar campaign enacted on Obama’s behalf has been invested to support a range of safe sex programs through out the country. Obama has promised to put scientific evidence before political ideology. [Washington Post]

Train the brain: using neurofeedback to treat ADHD: Neurofeedback is an alternative type of therapy intended to keep the brain calm and focused.  Although it is still scientifically unproved, expensive, and time consuming there is growing evidence that it can help. [NPR]

Analyzing eggs and their genetic junk offers clues to fertility: Brown University researchers eventually hope to be able to analyze eggs’ mRNA to determine if it’s normal or abnormal. If something’s askew in a particular egg’s polar body, it could be a biologic clue indicating that egg isn’t likely to successfully fertilize. This could later lead to new forms of contraception and new ways of detecting prime eggs to fertilize. [Time]

Add a Comment
Back To GoodyBlog

Could Your Guy’s Diet Be Harming His Sperm?

Wednesday, October 27th, 2010

Yesterday, we told you about Edward Nejat’s research that suggests type O blood may be a possible barrier to fertility in women.

Well, another day – another study. And this time, we’ve got something for the guys.

Today, researchers are reporting from the American Society of Reproductive Medicine conference in Denver that men who consume high levels of saturated fats may produce fewer sperm. A study, helmed by experts from Harvard Medical School, monitored dietary patterns in 91 men seeking fertility treatment and found “men in the highest third of saturated fat intake had 41% fewer sperm than those in the lowest third.”

As for the reason for the link between fat intake and sperm count, additional research is required, but according to Dr. Tony Rutherford of the British Fertility Society, these findings should encourage people to eat healthily. [The Independent]

Tell us: Will this news affect your family as you try to get pregnant, or is a healthy lifestyle a no-brainer?  Let us know in the comments below!

Add a Comment
Back To GoodyBlog

Could Your Blood Type Keep You From Getting Pregnant?

Tuesday, October 26th, 2010

Age, diet, weight, and lifestyle — we’re all aware of the different factors that affect fertility in women.

But blood type?

According to a new report from the American Society for Reproductive Medicine, women with type O blood may have a tougher time trying to get pregnant.

The study, led by Edward Nejat of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York, measured the levels of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), a substance that controls the ovaries’ production of eggs, in women under the age of 45 and found that those with type O blood were twice as likely to have FSH levels higher than 10— which means a low egg count — than women with other blood types. Nejat’s research did not conclude why this link between blood type and fertility exists.  [New Scientist]

What do you think: Is this just another study, or are you concerned about Nejat’s findings? Let us know in the comments!

Add a Comment
Back To GoodyBlog

A New — and Cheaper — Cure for Infertility?

Monday, October 18th, 2010

From across the pond comes new hope for couples struggling with fertility. Creators of a device called the DuoFertility system claim statistics prove it’s as successful as IVF, but way cheaper — with a one-year money-back guarantee, no less.

The device is worn under the woman’s arm, and measures body temperature 20,000 times every day, which in turn helps to identify the most fertile days and the best time to try.

What do you think? Would you give the new device a try?

Add a Comment
Back To GoodyBlog