Posts Tagged ‘ fertility treatments ’

About Infertility: A Nasty Triple Threat

Monday, April 22nd, 2013

about infertility awareness weekLet’s talk about something we really ought to be talking about a whole lot more: Infertility. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, roughly 6.7 million American women aged 15-44 (that’s about one in every ten) will or would have trouble getting pregnant.Yet there’s still this horrible stigma around talking about infertility.

The struggle to get pregnant is one of the worst triple threats a woman or couple could face. Several friends have been trusting enough to open up to me about trying to conceive, and, as a journalist I’ve interviewed many women coping with infertility over the years—yet the confusion, sadness, and frustration many feel never ceases to cut to my core. I’d call it more of an emotional hell than an emotional struggle. Then on top of that, you’ve got the physical struggle. Many fertility procedures are invasive (think surgery)—and getting daily or weekly fertility injections can be brutal.

Finally, and for some, most importantly—you’ve got the financial struggle. The thing is, the emotional and physical struggles are almost always worth it to women who want more than anything to become mothers. But the financial burden can only be “worth it” to those who can afford it, and that’s not everyone.

The high costs of fertility treatments often act as a flat-out barrier to those who can’t afford them. Sure, there are some places in this country where couples having trouble trying to conceive get awesome support—like Massachusetts, where insurance companies that provide pregnancy-related benefits are required to cover diagnosis and treatment of infertility, including IVF. That’s amazing . . . if you happen to live in Massachusetts. If you live in, say, Georgia, your insurance company isn’t required to cover any fertility treatments. Not one.

If you’re curious (or simply really need to know!) about infertility support where you live, you can look up fertility clinics in your area here, and then check out the just-released, state-by-state Fertility Scorecard, created by the phenomenal people over at the RESOLVE: The National Infertility Association. They’ve got an interactive map, showing you how each state ranks in terms of providing women with the tools they need to get pregnant. I think anyone looking at the facts will agree that we’ve got a long way to go when it comes to infertility support in America.

Image of couple dealing with infertility via Shutterstock.

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, August 9th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Clinical Trial Is Favorable for a Prenatal Gene Test
A new method of prenatal testing that can detect more genetic problems in a fetus than ever before could be headed toward wider use after encouraging results from a clinical trial, researchers say. The new technique surpassed standard testing in detecting chromosomal abnormalities, the study found. (via NY Times)

Fertility Treatments May Put Women At Risk for PTSD Symptoms, Study Suggests
Women who undergo fertility treatments may find the situation so distressing that they develop post-traumatic stress disorder, a new study says. In the study, close to 50 percent of participants met the official criteria for PTSD, meaning they could be diagnosed with the condition. (via MSNBC)

Diabetes and the Obesity Paradox
Type 2 diabetes, a condition widely thought of as a disease of the overweight and sedentary, also develops in people who aren’t overweight—and it may be more deadly. Scientists found those who were of normal weight around the time of their diagnoses were twice as likely to die within the same period. (via NY Times)

Boys Appear to Be More Vulnerable Than Girls to the Insecticide Chlorpyrifos
A new study found, at age 7, boys had greater difficulty working memory, a key component of IQ, than girls with similar prenatal exposure to the insecticide chlorpyrifos. Having nurturing parents improved working memory, especially in boys, though it didn’t lessen the negative effects of exposure. (via Science Daily)

Air Pollution Linked to Stillbirth Risk
Air pollution has been linked to a number of breathing problems, mainly in developing countries, and now a new preliminary study looking at pollution levels in New Jersey has found an increased risk of stillbirths among women exposed to certain pollutants. (via NBC News)

Stressed People Use Different Strategies and Brain Regions
Researchers have found stressed and non-stressed people use different brain regions and different strategies when learning. Non-stressed individuals applied a deliberate learning strategy, while stressed subjects relied more on their gut feeling. (via Science Daily)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, July 19th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Is Early Potty Training Harmful?
Many experts’ recommendations to get children out of diapers before age three can be dangerous for some children. A child’s bladder, which continues growing to its standard size until age three, grows stronger and faster when it’s filling and emptying uninhibited. You interrupt that process when you train early, one expert claims. (via ABC News)

US Panel: Improve Child Custody Rules for Military
A national legal panel that works to standardize state laws wants to simplify child custody rules for military service members, whose frequent deployments can leave them without clear legal recourse when family disputes erupt. (via Associated Press)

Lack of Exercise Is a Global Pandemic, Researchers Say
Lack of exercise causes as many as 1 in 10 premature deaths around the world each year — roughly as many as smoking, researchers say. This global pandemic is largely due to four major diseases: heart disease, Type 2 diabetes, breast cancer, and colon cancer. (via TIME)

Study Reveals How Some Kids Can Overcome Egg Allergies
Giving children with egg allergies small, and then increasingly higher, doses of the very food they are allergic to may eliminate, or at least reduce, reactions, a new study shows. (via MSNBC)

Mothers Who Use Fertility Drugs May Have Shorter Kids
A new study from Australia found boys whose mothers used fertility drugs were on average 1 inch shorter at ages 3 to 10, compared with boys of mothers who did not use the drugs. (via Fox News)

Breastfeeding Tied to Kids’ Nut Allergies in New Study, But Not All Agree
Australian researchers claim children who are exclusively breastfed for their first six months have a greater risk for developing a nut allergy than those given other foods or fluids, either exclusively or in combination with breast milk. (via Huffington Post)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Monday, May 7th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Argentine ‘Miracle Baby’ Tiny but Stable a Month On
An Argentine baby who was mistakenly declared dead and whose parents found her breathing in the morgue 12 hours later has survived her first month of life, weighing in at just under 1 kilo (2.2 pounds).

Birth Defect Risk Rises With Some Fertility Treatments
Test-tube babies have higher rates of birth defects, and doctors have long wondered: Is it because of certain fertility treatments or infertility itself? A large new study from Australia suggests both may play a role.

Second Trimester May Be Key for Regulating Weight Gain During Pregnancy
Overweight or obese women who gained an excessive amount of weight during the second trimester had a greater than 90 percent chance of gaining too much weight by the end of pregnancy, the study found.

Indiana Mom Sends Son to School With Stun Gun to Confront Bullies
An Indiana mother who sent her gay son to school with a stun gun after administrators apparently didn’t do enough to stop the bullying against him said she would do it again — even though the teen now faces expulsion.

All-Girl Classes Can Help in Math, Sciences
A Georgetown University study says 8 million jobs will be open in the math, science and technology fields by 2018. But the next generation of American workers will be unprepared, especially girls.

Parents Aren’t Destined to Be Unhappy
Findings from two new studies suggest parents today may indeed be happier than non-parents, and though parental happiness levels do drop, they don’t dip below the levels they were before having children.

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Friday, October 28th, 2011

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Ovarian Tumors May Develop Years After Fertility Therapy
Women who undergo ovarian stimulation to produce extra eggs for in-vitro fertilization (IVF) are at increased risk for a type of growth known as “borderline ovarian tumors,” new research suggests.

Parents Arrested After Giving Away Toddler
A Cleveland couple faces child endangerment charges after giving away their neglected 2-year-old girl, authorities said.

In High Schools, a Critical Lens on Food
A new series of courses at 15 New York City high schools is aiming to make students aware of the politics, marketing and demographics of the food industry.

U.K. Scientists Grow Super Broccoli
British scientists unveiled a new breed of broccoli that was specially grown to contain two to three times the normal amount of glucoraphanin, a nutrient believed to help ward off heart disease.

52 Percent of Kids Under Age 8 Have Access to Mobile Media
52 percent of all children 8 and younger have access to mobile devices at home like a smartphone, video iPod, iPad or other tablet, according to Common Sense Media, a nonprofit group that studies children’s use of technology.

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Do Fertility Drugs Cause Cancer?

Monday, October 17th, 2011

This question has been running through my mind all day today. I was eating breakfast with my son Mason when E! News host Giuliana Rancic, 37, announced on the Today Show that she had been diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer. The shocking diagnosis was made while she was undergoing health screenings before her third round of  in-vitro fertilization (IVF). I’ve watched her struggle with infertility, two rounds of IVF, and a miscarriage on her Style Network reality show Giuliana & Bill, and I had been hoping that she was about to announce that she was finally pregnant. And now this?

At work, several people asked me if I thought that the fertility drugs Giuliana had taken had caused her cancer. (I edit the Pregnancy Channel on Parents.com.) I’ve been researching the topic tonight and the articles that I’ve read have all said that there is no proven link between fertility drugs and cancer. On its website the American Cancer Society addresses breast cancer specifically and says, “IVF does not appear to cause breast cancer.” I’m certain more studies will be done on this topic, and I hope that there’s never evidence to the contrary.

The hero in this story is Giuliana’s doctor, in my opinion. He probably saved her life when he insisted that she get a mammogram. Most likely, a pregnancy would have accelerated her cancer and her prognosis could have been very bleak. As a precaution, I had a mammogram before my husband and I started trying for Mason; my own mother battled and beat breast cancer at the age of 34. Giuliana, however, said during her Today Show interview that she hadn’t planned on getting a mammogram until she turned 40, even though her aunt had been diagnosed with breast cancer previously.

Did your doctor suggest that you get a mammogram before you got pregnant? Do you think mammograms should be recommended for all women who are trying to get pregnant?

(photo: eonline.com)

 

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