Posts Tagged ‘ FDA ’

Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, August 2nd, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Fudge Factor: Americans in Denial About Weight Gain
Researchers from the University of Washington found people — especially men — often think they are losing weight when they really aren’t, a new study shows. (via NBC News)

Study: Shaky Mental Health Linked to Higher Death Risk
Among disease-free, healthy adults included within a new U.K. study, the more signs of psychological distress people had, the higher the death rates they experienced — even at low levels of distress and even after accounting for a large number of health conditions and health behaviors that might explain the link. (via TIME)

23andMe Seeks FDA Approval for Personal DNA Test
Genetic test maker 23andMe is asking the Food and Drug Administration to approve its personalized DNA test. The company’s saliva-based kits have attracted scrutiny for claiming to help users detect whether they are likely to develop illnesses like breast cancer, heart disease, and Alzheimer’s. (via Associated Press)

Why Lack of Sleep Weakens Vaccine Effectiveness
A new study shows people getting less than six hours of sleep per night on average were far less likely than longer sleepers to show adequate antibody responses to the vaccine and so they were far more likely — 11.5 times more likely — to be unprotected by the immunization. (via TIME)

Mindfulness Training May Improve Health and Well-Being of Pregnant Women and Newborns
First-time mothers who pay attention to their emotional and physical changes during their pregnancy may feel better and have healthier newborns than new mothers who don’t, research suggests. (via Science Daily)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Wednesday, July 18th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

FDA: BPA Banned in Baby Bottles
The federal government announced Tuesday that baby bottles and sippy cups can no longer contain the controversial chemical bisphenol-A, or BPA. The American Chemistry Council asked the FDA to phase out rules allowing BPA in those products in October. (via Associated Press)

Sports Promote Healthy Weight in Teenagers
New findings published in the journal Pediatrics are among the first to demonstrate that walking or riding a bike to school actually has an impact on weight gain among high school students. Also, playing on at least one high school sports team, but preferably two or more, can significantly lower the likelihood of obesity in teens. (via NY Times)

Dads’ Jobs Linked to Birth Defect Risks
Certain jobs held by men in the months before they conceive a child may increase the risk of birth defects, a new study suggests. Many of these occupations included environments where workers are commonly exposed to solvents. (via MSNBC)

Mothers Who Have Heavier Babies May Be at Increased Risk of Breast Cancer, Study Finds
A hefty birth weight may put mothers at more than twice the risk of breast cancer compared with a woman who had a comparatively smaller baby, according to preliminary data from two studies, published Tuesday in the journal PLoS One. (via CNN)

Autism Survey for Parents May Catch Disorder Early
A survey, called The First Year Inventory, given to parents when their children are 1 year old may help identify kids at risk of autism, a new study suggests. (via MSNBC)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, July 17th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Assault: Children With Disabilities Are More Likely to Be Victims of Violence, Analysis Shows
Children with disabilities are almost four times more likely to be victims of violence than other children, according to a new report commissioned by the World Health Organization. The report, published in The Lancet on Thursday, found that disabled children were 3.6 times more likely to be physically assaulted and 2.9 times more likely to be sexually assaulted. (via NY Times)

Girls as Young as 6 Want to be ‘Sexy,’ Study Says
Most girls as young as 6 are already beginning to think of themselves as sex objects, according to a new study of elementary school-age kids in the Midwest. The study, published online July 6 in the journal Sex Roles, also identified factors that protect girls from objectifying themselves. (via MSNBC)

Women Beat Men on IQ Tests For First Time
New research is providing an answer to the age-old, delicate question: who is smarter, men or women? A new study has come down on the feminine side of that argument, finding that women now score higher on IQ tests than men. (via ABC News)

Tooth Fillings Made With BPA Tied to Behavior Issues
Kids who get dental fillings made using BPA are more likely to have behavior and emotional problems a few years later, according to a new study. (via Fox News)

Cord Blood Stem Cells Restore Toddler’s Hearing
Madeleine, 2, became the first child to undergo an experimental hearing loss treatment through an FDA-approved trial at Memorial Hermann-Texas Medical Center that infused stem cells from her own banked cord blood into her damaged inner ear. Within the last six months, Connor says she’s seen a dramatic improvement in Madeleine’s ability to hear. (via Yahoo!)

Study Links Child Abuse to Home Foreclosures
Researchers found just under a 1 percent increase in the number of general physical abuse cases reported at 38 pediatric hospitals every year between 2000 and 2009 and a more than 3 percent rise in the number of traumatic brain injuries seen in babies. (via MSNBC)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Friday, June 15th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Hidden Hairs Can Strangle Baby’s Tiny Toes
If a single strand of hair wraps around a baby’s toe, it can cut off circulation and ultimately doom the appendage. Though rare, this happens often enough for doctors to have given it a name: toe tourniquet syndrome. (via msnbc.com)

FDA Approves Infant Combo Vaccine for Meningitis
The first vaccine that protects children as young as six weeks against two potentially deadly bacterial infections has won approval from U.S. health regulators. (via AP)

“Darth Vader” Boy from Super Bowl Ad Has Heart Surgery
Doctors on Thursday performed successful open-heart surgery on the 7-year-old boy who starred as a mini-Darth Vader in a popular Super Bowl commercial, according to the Los Angeles hospital where he was treated. (via Reuters)

Cost of Rearing a Child Rises to $234,000
For a child born now, it will cost an average of $234,900 to raise them, and that’s just to age 18. The total cost is up 3.5 percent from a year ago, according to the US Department of Agriculture report. (via ABC News)

Neighbors Ban 3-Year-Old’s Sidewalk Chalk
When Colorado mom Sarah Cohen found out her 3-year-old daughter was being banned from doing sidewalk doodles, she chalked it up to a misunderstanding. But the crackdown on sidewalk chalk was no joke to Cohen’s local housing association in the Denver suburb of Stapleton, which said little Emerson’s scribbles are violating neighborhood rules. (via New York Daily News)

Nearly 20 Percent of Teens Admit to ‘Sexting’
Despite knowing the consequences, many teens still send sexually explicit photos to others using their cellphones, a new study on sexting suggests. (via msnbc.com)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Monday, June 4th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Premature Babies Have Higher Mental Illness Risk
Babies born prematurely have a much higher risk of developing severe mental disorders including psychosis, bipolar disorder and depression, according to a study to be published on Monday.

FDA Warns About Benzocaine in Baby Pain Gels
A new consumer update released by the Food and Drug Administration says babies and benzocaine–an ingredient found in many over the counter pain gels and liquids–don’t mix.

Facebook Mulls Letting Kids Under 13 Aboard
Facebook’s 13-and-up age cut-off could soon be a thing of the past.

Most New Moms Don’t Meet Own Breastfeeding Goals
Two thirds of new mothers who intended to breastfeed exclusively for several months or more didn’t meet their own goals in a new study.

Obama Writes Note to Excuse Boy from School
When a Minnesota fifth-grader skipped school to see his father introduce President Obama at a campaign event, he received the excuse note of a lifetime, personally written by the president himself.

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No New Name for High Fructose Corn Syrup

Thursday, May 31st, 2012

Savvy shoppers know to scour nutrition labels. Sometimes, that’s easier said than done. Labels are already pretty tricky to decipher— it’s difficult to make sense of ingredients like xanthan gum, datem, and disodium phosphate. Nutrition information could have gotten even more confusing, thanks to a suggestion from the Corn Refiners Association.

In 2010, the CRA petitioned the Food and Drug Administration to change the term “high fructose corn syrup” to “corn sugar” on nutritional labels. Yesterday, the FDA denied the request, suggesting that the name change would have inaccurately portrayed the ingredient as “natural.”  The sweetener is widely used in snack foods, condiments, and other pantry staples. (And sugar is in more foods than you might think.)

In order to make thoughtful decisions about what to feed their families, shoppers need to be able to understand the ingredients, and recognize those that they want to avoid. Here’s hoping that keeping the term “high fructose corn syrup” will empower consumers to shop smart.

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A Reminder to Double-Check Acetaminophen Dosages

Friday, December 23rd, 2011

You probably heard the news in May when major manufacturers of liquid acetaminophen, who previously made different strengths of the medicine, agreed to switch to production of a single concentration of 160 mg/5 mL in an effort to reduce dosing errors and prevent accidental poisonings in infants. But because this change to a less-concentrated version was voluntary, not all manufactures have made the change, leading to some justified confusion. Now, the FDA is reminding consumers to carefully read labels of liquid acetaminophen marketed for infants.

To avoid giving the wrong dose to your child, make sure you know whether you’re giving the less-concentrated liquid acetaminophen or the older, more-concentrated version, and follow these guidelines from the FDA:

-Read the Drug Facts label on the package very carefully to identify the concentration of the liquid acetaminophen, the correct dosage, and the directions for use.
-Do not depend on a banner proclaiming that the product is “new.” Some medicines with the old concentration also have this headline on their packaging.
-Use only the dosing device provided with the purchased product in order to correctly measure the right amount of liquid acetaminophen.
-Consult your pediatrician before giving this medication and make sure you’re both talking about the same concentration. (If your M.D. prescribes a 5mL dose of the less-concentrated liquid acetaminophen, but you give your child 5mL of the older, more-concentrated medicine, your child could have a potentially fatal overdose.)                                                                                                                                                                          -Check with your pediatrician for dosing instructions for children under 2 years.

 

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Is Apple Juice Poisonous? Experts Explain the Arsenic Controversy

Friday, September 16th, 2011

The highly publicized clash between Dr Oz and the FDA regarding acceptable levels of arsenic in apple juice has left many wondering, ‘Well, what exactly is safe?’. We called upon two health experts, Elisa Zied, MS, RD, CDN, and author of Nutrition At Your Fingertips, and Connie Diekman, M.Ed, RD, LD, FADA, and director of University Nutrition at Washington University, to help clear up some of the confusion.

What do you make of the controversy between Dr. Oz and the FDA?

Connie Diekman: As a registered dietitian I appreciate Dr Oz’s passion for and interest in healthful eating but hate to see such controversy causing confusion and angst for parents. Parents are working hard to provide the right food choices and activity for their children and they need role models who provide information that is based on the science of nutrition in a simple to implement manner.

Can you explain the difference between “good” and “bad” arsenic in food? 

CD: There are two types of arsenic – organic and inorganic. The inorganic form is the one that is harmful, and while arsenic exists in both forms in foods, the inorganic arsenic is the main form found in drinking water. This higher concentration in drinking water is the reason that the EPA, and subsequently the FDA, established limits of safety for drinking water.

Organic arsenic is found in a variety of foods, including fish, seafood, fruits, fruit juices, vegetables, and rice. Organic compounds are easily digestible and do not accumulate in the body as inorganic compounds can, thus intake of organic arsenic, especially at the low levels it exists in foods, is not a concern.

What are the acceptable FDA levels of arsenic in food?

CD: There is no scientific evidence available to allow FDA to set limits for food. The very small amounts in food, combined with the majority being organic, makes it difficult to conduct studies that consistently show a level of risk or safety.

Why would the FDA have higher acceptable levels of arsenic in apple juice as compared to drinking water?

Elisa Zied: The FDA says the levels vary because humans drink and consume a lot more water than they drink other beverages, including apple juice. Because water is more commonly consumed and the quantities consumed are so much higher than they are for juice or other beverages, it’s more important to limit potentially harmful chemicals in it to minimize their total exposure to potentially harmful chemicals. 

CD: The EPA set the level for water based on the average consumption amounts of water, which are significantly higher than those of juice. In addition, since the arsenic in water is predominately inorganic it is easy to measure amounts.

What parents should do with regard to giving their kids apple juice?

EZ: Apple juice–like all juice and other calorie-containing beverages–should be limited in the diet. The AAP recommends 4 to 6 ounces of 100 percent fruit juice to kids ages 1 to 6 ; older kids should limit it to no more than 8-12 ounces if they consume it.

It’s wise to encourage fresh fruit as main source of daily fruit intake because its higher in fiber and more filling. But 100 percent fruit juice can fit into a healthful diet; to lower the amount consumed  you can combine with water or seltzer. Like with all food or beverages, it’s wise to mix up what kids consume from each of the different key food groups. For example, one day have an apple and some strawberries, the next day a banana and some apple juice or orange juice, the next day grapes and some honeydew, the next day some dried fruit and watermelon. Consuming different foods and beverages within the same category mixes up the nutrients you get and can potentially minimize risks of exposure to low levels of contaminants you may find in different foods and beverages.

CD: Apple juice can be a part of a healthful eating plan but as with all fruit juices it should not be a child’s main fruit source. Nutritional and health benefits of whole fruits are better than those of juice, so encouraging kids to enjoy fruit should be the first step.

Readers, what do you think? Do you trust that the FDA has your child’s safety covered or, given Dr. Oz’s concerns, are you now hesitant to give your child apple juice?

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