Posts Tagged ‘ FDA ’

Parents Daily News Roundup

Monday, December 31st, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Pediatricians Say Recess Is As Important as Math or Reading
Recess can be a critical time for development and social interaction, and in a new policy statement published in the journal Pediatrics, pediatricians from the AAP support the importance of having a scheduled break in the school day. (via TIME)

Moms Push to Have First Babies of the New Year
The odds of having a baby in the first minute of the year aren’t far from the odds of getting struck by lightning, said Dr. Jennifer Austin, an OB/GYN at Kaiser Permanente in San Francisco. Yet every year, several mothers strive to do so. (via ABC News)

Every School Needs a Doctor, Pediatricians Say
Despite no federal or uniform state requirements to do so, all school districts should have a doctor to oversee school health services, according to a policy statement from a group of American pediatricians. (via Reuters)

FDA Approves First Tuberculosis Drug in 40 Years
The Food and Drug Administration says it has approved a Johnson & Johnson tuberculosis drug that is the first new medicine to fight the deadly infection in more than four decades. (via Associated Press)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Wednesday, October 24th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Serious Birth Complications Rising in the U.S
Severe complications from childbirth are rare in the U.S., but they are becoming more common, a new government study finds. (via Reuters)

Cancer Survivors Keep Fertility with New Treatment
Until very recently, young women who went through cancer treatment often discovered their fertility was a casualty of life-saving therapies. But a new option – the removal and freezing of an ovary prior to chemotherapy and radiation treatments – may be changing all that. (via NBC News)

When Caffeine Kills: Energy Drinks Under the Spotlight
The Food and Drug Administration is investigating reports that five people died and one survived a heart attack after consuming energy drinks. (via NBC News)

NBA Forced Women With Young Children Out Of Jobs: Lawsuit
A New Jersey woman who worked for the NBA as a senior account executive filed a $3 million gender discrimination lawsuit against the league Tuesday, saying it forced her and two other women with young children out of their jobs. (via Huffington Post)

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Arsenic in Rice: Should We Cut This Grain Out of Our Children’s Diets?

Thursday, September 20th, 2012

By Elisa Zied, MS, RD, CDN

Move over juice—rice and rice products are now garnering considerable attention for being a source of arsenic, thanks to a recent Consumer Reports article. Following a report they published last January about concerning levels of arsenic in both apple and grape juices, the popular magazine now reveals surprising findings about rice and its many forms in 60 products commonly found in grocery stores. Turns out there’s arsenic—and sometimes, “worrisome amounts,” according to the report—in a range of rice products, including organic rice baby cereal, rice breakfast cereal, brown rice, and rice milk.

The report itself—and no doubt the media frenzy surrounding it—has led many of us to scratch our heads, and wonder if we unknowingly exposed our families to a potentially dangerous chemical. You may have even thrown out all the rice and rice products in your cupboard. But are we overreacting?

Before you jump on what’s sure to be an anti-rice bandwagon, it’s important to understand what arsenic is, and to know that it’s not all created equally.

According to the Food and Drug Administration, arsenic is a chemical element naturally found in water, air, food, and soil. It also occurs as a result of contamination from human activity (such as burning coal, oil, or using pesticides that contain arsenic). Although found in both organic and inorganic forms, inorganic arsenic is the form that has been linked with higher rates of skin, bladder, and lung cancers; and heart disease. Some studies have also suggested that chronic exposure to arsenic can contribute to cognitive and other developmental disabilities.

Although arsenic works its way through soil and water into many healthful foods, including grains, fruits, and vegetables, the FDA, which has monitored arsenic levels in foods since 1991, says rice may be more susceptible to absorbing arsenic than other grains.

Despite the findings by Consumer Reports and its own, just-released preliminary study findings on an analysis of 200 grocery store items (with another 1,000 to go),the FDA won’t, at this time, tell Americans to forego rice and rice products. Instead, it urges them to consume a variety of grains as part of a well-balanced diet.

Consumer Reports, however, suggests limiting infants to no more than 1 serving a day of infant rice cereal. They also encourage diets with lower arsenic grain options, including wheat cereals, oatmeal, and corn grits. Daily rice drinks for children under age 5 are not recommended.
Until more information is known, it’s probably wise to heed the advice of both the FDA and Consumer Reports. Continue to feed your child—and yourself—a varied diet with foods from all the basic food groups. Also, mix up the foods you choose from each food group—that way you’ll consume different combinations of nutrients, and at the same time, limit your exposure to chemicals that may prove to be harmful.

The American Academy of Pediatrics says additional research is needed before recommendations can be made on the possible risks involved in consuming rice and rice products, including baby cereal.

If you’re concerned about arsenic in your favorite rice product, contact the manufacturer or the FDA. And if you decide to remove rice and rice products from your diet, be sure to fill the gap with other healthful whole grain foods to get complex carbohydrates, fiber, B vitamins, and other valuable nutrients.

Elisa Zied, MS, RD, CDN, is a Parents advisor. You can follow her on Twitter at @elisazied.

Image: Rice via Shutterstock

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Wednesday, September 19th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Pacifiers May Have Emotional Consequences for Boys
Pacifiers may stunt the emotional development of baby boys by robbing them of the opportunity to try on facial expressions during infancy. (via Science Daily)

‘SimplyThick’ a Risk to All Infants, FDA Cautions
A product used to help infants with difficulty swallowing could increase their risk of developing a life-threatening illness, the Food and Drug Administration warned Tuesday. (via CNN)

Longer Exercise Provides Added Benefit to Children’s Health
Twenty minutes of daily, vigorous physical activity over just three months can reduce a child’s risk of diabetes as well as his total body fat — including dangerous, deep abdominal fat — but 40 minutes works even better, researchers report. (via Science Daily)

Study Shows Almost Half of Children with Autism Victimized by Bullies
A recent study shows that children with autism are more than four times as likely to be the victims of bullying than their typically developing siblings. (via The Washington Post)

Teens Follow Parents Example in Texting and Driving
According to a recent study, 78% of teens have seen their parents text and drive. (via TODAY)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, September 11th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Key Breast Milk Ingredient Synthesized
Engineers have synthesized a sugar that is one of the key nutrients found in breast milk. (via Science Daily)

Some Children May Need Two Flu Shots
The American Academy of Pediatrics released its new guidelines for children’s influenza vaccines saying that this year some may need two shots depending on their age and when they last received a vaccination. (via CNN)

Mother’s Depression Linked to Children’s Height
According to researchers, children whose mothers were depressed during their first year of life experience stunted growth. (via ABC News)

Increase in Antipsychotic Drug Use in Children
Although the drugs are not approved by the FDA, antipsychotic drug use is being prescribed by more doctors, particularly for children with ADHD. (via Science Daily)

Number of Homeless Children in New York Nears Great Depression Highs
Along with a rise in overall homelessness in New York City, 19,000 children are now living in the city’s homeless shelter system. (The Daily News)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Wednesday, August 22nd, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Doctors Announce FDA-Approved Trial to Cure Autism with Cord Blood
Researchers announced Tuesday the beginning of a FDA-approved clinical trial that uses umbilical cord blood stem cells to ‘cure’ autism. (via Fox News)

Ouch-Free Vaccines? They’re in The Works
Every parent dreads holding the baby still while a nurse or technician pushes a needle into a plump little thigh. But what if a little clear patch arrived by mail, one that could be stuck onto the child’s back and then would dissolve painlessly? (via MSNBC)

Music Lessons Linked to Lasting Brain Benefits
A study of 45 young adults found those with at least one year of childhood musical training had enhanced neurological responses to sound, a trait tied to improved learning and listening abilities. (via ABC)

More Hispanics Are in College, Report Finds
College enrollment has soared for Hispanic young adults in the last few years. Among Americans ages 18 to 24 with a high school diploma or equivalent, 46 percent of Hispanics were enrolled in college last year, up from 37 percent in 2008. (via New York Times)

Child Eating Disorders On the Rise
A study conducted by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality showed that hospitalizations for eating disorders in children under 12 increased by 119% between 1999 and 2006. (via CNN)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Monday, August 20th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

What’s the Right Age to Give Your Kid A Cell Phone?
The most popular age at which parents give their kids cell phones is 12. Are tweens ready to handle the responsibility of their own digital link to the world? (via Time)

Vermont Brothers Get Deadly Disease, But Only One Gets Healing Drug
The Leclaire brothers were born with the same deadly disease — Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Max, 10, is in a clinical trial for a new drug that has miraculously reversed some of his debilitating symptoms, but Austin, 13, has been turned away. (via ABC News)

Salmonella Outbreak in 20 States Kills 2 and Sickens 141
An outbreak of salmonella infections across 20 states has resulted in two deaths and sickened 141 people in recent weeks, state and federal authorities said. (via New York Times)

Secondhand Smoke Impairs Vital Cough Reflex in Kids
New research from the Monell Center reveals that exposure to secondhand smoke decreases sensitivity to cough-eliciting respiratory irritants in otherwise healthy children and adolescents. (via Science Daily)

Vitamin C May Lessen Harmful Effects of Air Pollution
There’s another reason to eat fruits and veggies: A diet rich in them may lessen the harmful effects of air pollution for people suffering from chronic lung diseases. (via MSNBC)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Friday, August 17th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

The Motherhood Penalty: We’re in the Midst of a ‘Mom-Cession’
Married mothers find it harder to secure a new job after being laid off and when they do, they earn less than married fathers. (via Time)

8 Children Die in August After Being Left in Hot Cars
Twenty-three children have died of hyperthermia in cars in 14 states this year and eight of the deaths occurred in the first week of August. Nearly 40 children die this way each year, according to Kids and Cars. (via ABC News)

FDA Investigates Codeine Safety After Children’s Deaths
A new study scheduled for publication in The Journal of Pediatrics finds that delaying gratification longer at 4 years of age is associated with having a lower body mass index (BMI) 30 years later. (via ABC News)

Smoking in Pregnancy Increases Asthma Risk in Preschool
Maternal smoking during pregnancy is associated with wheeze and asthma in preschool children, even among children who were not exposed to maternal smoking late in pregnancy or after birth, according to a new study. (via Science Daily)

Children’s self-control may help keep them thin
The ability to delay gratification as a child may lower a person’s chances of being overweight later in life, according to new research. (via MSNBC)

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