Posts Tagged ‘ eyes ’

Parents Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, May 8th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Mothers Like Chubby Toddlers, Study Suggests
Mothers of overweight toddlers often mistakenly think their children are normal weight, and mothers of underweight toddlers often wish they were plumper, U.S. researchers said on Monday.

Maurice Sendak, Author of Splendid Nightmares, Dies at 83
Mr. Sendak, known in particular for “Where the Wild Things Are,” was widely considered the most important children’s book artist of the 20th century.

Why Up to 90% of Asian Schoolchildren Are Nearsighted
Researchers say the culprit is academic ambition: spending too much time studying indoors and not enough hours in bright sunlight is ruining kids’ eyesight.

Olympics-London Games Venues Opened to ‘Babes in Arms’
Babies will be allowed into London Olympic venues without a ticket if they are firmly fastened to an adult, organizers said on Tuesday in a climb-down after complaints from angry mothers.

1 in 8 Teens Misuses Prescription Painkillers
One in eight older teens has used powerful painkillers when they weren’t prescribed — and many of them start misusing the medications earlier than was previously assumed, according to new research.

Asian Women Command Premium Prices for Egg Donation in U.S.
Asian women can get about $10,000 to $20,000 for their eggs, while women of other ethnic groups typically get about $6,000.

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Blindsided Again!

Tuesday, July 12th, 2011

Yesterday my daughter Lila had her followup visit with the ophthalmologist. It’s been three months since she got her glasses, and the point of the visit was to make sure the glasses are doing their job, which is to help bring her left eye up to speed and to stop putting all the burden on her stronger right eye.

Lila’s been such a good sport about wearing her glasses, and she now enjoys “reading” (unlike before, when she’d run away when we tried to sit her down with a book). So I knew the glasses were working. But just like the first time she went to the eye doctor and I didn’t even join my husband on the appointment because I was so sure there was nothing wrong, I once again found myself taken aback by the outcome.

The first part of the exam went fine. The doctor complimented Lila for following his finger back and forth so well. He asked if she ever crosses her eyes. Nope. Does she wear her glasses regularly? Yep. All good.

Then we moved on to vision chart, where Lila, still in glasses, had to identify pictures projected on the wall while a tissue covered her good eye. First up: a cake with candles.

“Birthday cake.”

Then a bird. “Duck.” Close enough.

Then a hand. “Birthday cake.” Crap.

“That’s a birthday cake?” the doctor asked.

I found myself looking at the fingers and thinking, “They sort of look like candles…”

He tried again, using a bigger version of the hand. “Birthday cake.”

That was all it took for him to recommend Lila wear an eye patch in addition to her glasses.  She’ll wear it over her good eye for the next four weeks. If the doctor determines that her weaker eye is getting stronger, she can stop the patch, but we’ll have to check back in a month after that to make sure her eye isn’t weakening again.

I felt like crying when he told me all of this. But when Lila asked, “Mommy, you sad?” I snapped out of it. We picked up the patches at CVS and headed home to try them on.

This daughter of mine—who isn’t what I would call a low-maintenance child—didn’t even flinch when I applied the patch. She didn’t try to remove it, she didn’t complain. It was a non-issue.

My older daughter, on the other hand… She was the one who needed comfort. Julia cried when she saw Lila with the patch. Then she told me in a quiet, shaky voice, “I don’t even want to look at her.” Then she stared nonstop, with a furrowed brow and panicked expression. So we had a private little talk. She admitted that she’s worried about Lila’s eyes. She thinks Lila looks “funny” with the patch. She’s scared people will laugh at her little sister. I was able to calm her down by explaining that I was upset at first too, and that the patch really will help Lila. But at bedtime the fears started in again, and she said she didn’t want Lila to walk with her into day camp like she usually does because she doesn’t want her counselors to stare at her. Sigh.

But here’s my question for all of you who’ve been down this patch path: Are the cheapie ones from the drugstore the way to go, at least for now? I like them because they’re subtle. But should we try the more colorful ones that Lila might find more fun to wear—and may last longer—but will also draw lots of attention to her? You were all so great about sharing advice when I found out Lila needed glasses. I’d be grateful for more now that we’re at this next step.  Thank you!

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Protecting Your Kid’s Eyes from the Summer Sun

Tuesday, June 28th, 2011

childrens-sunglassesIt’s not just your child’s skin that needs protection from UV rays; eyes also need protection.  Parents.com asked Michael Pier, O.D., Director of Professional Relations and Practitioner Education at Bausch + Lomb Vision Care North America, to answer questions about keeping kids’ eyes safe from the sun.

What are the best ways parents can protect their children’s eyes from the sun’s glare during the summer?

Children should wear sunglasses or a wide brim hat in bright sunlight. This is extremely important when they are outside between 10:00 am – 2:00 pm when UV rays are strongest.

At what age should kids start wearing sunglasses? How do parents know which sunglasses are the most effective?

Sunglasses are available for children as young as 6 months old. There are special frames that contour to a child’s face and fit the “youth” bridge of the nose.  Make sure your child’s sunglasses say they block 99%-100% of UVA and UVB rays.

Is there other protective eye gear that children should wear?

Children who are active in sports should wear sports goggles that feature UV protection treatment.   For children 8-12 years old, daily disposable contact lenses are also available through prescriptions (Bausch + Lomb offers SofLens). 

How can eyes be kept safe from chlorine at the pool, sand at the beach, allergens in the backyard, etc.?

Kids should refrain from touching their eyes with unwashed hands. If kids feel the need to rub their eyes, encourage them to use a clean towel when outdoors.  

If eyes are exposed to too much sun, what first aid procedures can parents rely on?

Excessive exposure usually result in sunburned lids and eye area.  Manage the sunburned places with delicate applications of soothing creams or lotions, but avoid putting anything in the eyes.

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Didn’t See This One Coming

Tuesday, April 12th, 2011

In the middle of all the excitement of potty training, Lila had her 2 1/2 year checkup last week. It was actually kind of fun. Our pediatrician called Lila “awesome” when she told the doctor, unprompted, “I am happy.” And she called her “amazing” when Lila got not one but two shots without so much as flinching. (It was pretty amazing.)

But the doctor didn’t love how the eye exam went down. When I helped by covering one of Lila’s eyes while she identified pictures on the vision chart, she kept pushing my hand away. Then she correctly identified the bird in the top row, but then when the doctor pointed to a bird a few rows down, Lila said “Two birds.” “You see two birds?” the doctor asked, but I knew what Lila meant: She saw one bird up top, and this was the second. “But most kids wouldn’t say ‘two birds,’” the doctor explained. “They’d usually say ‘another bird.’” We tried again to put my hand in front of her right eye but Lila squirmed away. I told the doctor that I really thought Lila simply didn’t want my hand there, and she said, “I’m inclined to believe that, too, but let’s have her checked by an ophthalmologist just to be sure.” I couldn’t have been less concerned. I knew exactly why Lila reacted the way she did during the exam. In fact, when my husband made the appointment for yesterday at 5 p.m., it didn’t even cross my mind to leave work early to join them.

So it was shocking—and way more upsetting than I anticipated—when my husband called to tell me that Lila needs glasses. She’s farsighted in her left eye, and her right eye has been compensating (probably since birth, the ophthalmologist told me this morning). He praised our pediatrician for being “clever enough” to pick up on this, because without that eye exam, it’s not something that we would have figured out on our own. I’m so grateful to our doctor for catching this when Lila is so young. I also can’t help but feel a little disappointed that my instincts were off. I was so sure I was reading my daughter’s behavior correctly. Looking back, of course a doctor who performs pediatric eye exams every day would recognize a potentially problematic one when she sees it.

So on Saturday we’ll go get Lila glasses. One of the great things about my job is that within five minutes of hanging up with my husband yesterday, I had a small pile of all the vision stories we’ve done here at Parents over the past few years. I’m pretty sure I know the right material (titanium), frame shape (squarish), lens type (polycarbonate with reflective coating), and extras (spring hinges). But for all of you parents of little ones with glasses out there, I’d love to know any tips you want to share. What brand do you like? What features are a must for a toddler? How did you convince your child to keep his/her glasses on? (I have a kid who won’t even let me keep a barrette in her hair.) Is a strap better than covered earpieces? Thanks for any advice! And I’ll be back with an update once Lila’s an official glasses-wearer.

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