Posts Tagged ‘ doctor ’

Looking for Baby’s Future Pediatrician? Dr. Todd Rosengart of Vitals.com Can Help!

Friday, April 18th, 2014

Just because Baby’s in the womb doesn’t mean you should hold off on your pediatrician search! The process may seem daunting, but these tips from Chief Medical Officer Dr. Todd Rosengart of Vitals—a website that offers patient reviews and background information about all types of docs—will ease the burden.

Top 5 Tips For Finding a Pediatrician You Love

1. Location

You’re gong to be doing a lot of traveling back and forth to your pediatrician’s office, particularly during the first few months. Choose somewhere that’s easy to get to and has enough parking. A long drive and lack of empty parking spaces can be a headache, especially when you’re dealing with car seats and strollers.

2. Reputation

One of the best ways to find a good pediatrician is to ask friends and family members who are like-minded and have a similar philosophy on health care and raising kids. If they recommend a pediatrician, there’s a good chance you will like him or her, too. Follow up with your own research at sites like Vitals.com and take into account what other people say about the doctor.

3. Philosophy

Make sure your pediatrician’s parenting philosophy aligns with yours. There’s no one right way to raise a baby, but it can be uncomfortable if your child’s doctor doesn’t agree with how you want to feed or educate your child. The best way to get to know a doctor: Schedule a prenatal visit before your child’s born. That way you can ask questions about his values and opinions and make sure they align with yours before you entrust him with your child’s care.

4. Availability

Your baby will need the most medical care when he’s little, but there are times it’s going to be inconvenient. You’ll want to be able to get your child in for an appointment should he need a last-minute visit–or at least be able to reach your doctor. See how your pediatrician handles a request for a pre-natal visit; that will be a good indicator of his or her availability. If he won’t take 15 minutes out of his day to talk to expecting parents, there’s a good chance he won’t take time out of his day for more pressing concerns.

5. Good Listener

When looking for a pediatrician, you want a doctor who takes the time to listen and not rush you through appointments or meetings. Of course, this goes for any doctor, but especially new parents who can’t explain symptoms themselves. You need a doctor who’s going to treat your child–and you–as important.

Not sure how you’ll be able to tell if Baby’s fever is serious? Watch below to find out which symptoms warrant a visit to the doc.

When is a Fever Serious?
When is a Fever Serious?
When is a Fever Serious?

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Conquering Kids’ Fear of Needles

Thursday, January 24th, 2013

girl getting a shotIf your child is anything like mine, you probably dread vaccination day. When my then 3-year-old daughter wrapped her arms around me, and used every muscle in her little legs to push off of the examination table sending me flying backward into the hall, I have to admit, I deeply considered skipping the next round. But we pushed through them, and now at five, she’s replaced her fear of needles with a fear of large cotton swabs (a strep test — it’s a long story).

Although we’ve all witnessed a runaway kid or two at the pediatrician’s office, the truth behind this needle nightmare is that one in every 10 Americans has a fear needles, or trypanophobia. Digital health media company, Healthline, has called it an under-reported healthcare crisis. Fear of needles can cause a person to skip vaccinations, which puts everyone’s health at risk.

According to Healthline, needle phobia usually develops around age 4 or 5 with a traumatic immunization experience. And if you told your kid that it wasn’t going to hurt, you can bet his immunization experience was traumatic.

According to Healthline’s CEO West Shell, “The key to ending needle phobia is awareness, education, and action. Needle phobia must be addressed and it must be addressed on large public platforms. Fear of snakes or fear of public speaking doesn’t kill people, but fear of needles does.”

Healthline has recently launched a public health campaign to help put an end to needle phobia. Take the End Needle Phobia Pledge, and help prevent your children from developing needle phobia by telling them the truth: shots help to protect them and others from dangerous diseases, and they hurt – but only for a second.

You can also download the first ever app to help children overcome their fear of needles, Pablo the Pufferfish: Big Shots Game.

Our kids get about 30 shots before they turn 5. It’s time we take steps toward making it easier on all of us.

Image: Worried and Afraid Little Girl Receiving An Injection via Shutterstock

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How One Mom’s Pictures on Facebook Saved Her Son’s Life

Wednesday, July 13th, 2011

LeoWhen Deborah Copaken Kogan snapped a photo of her 4-year-old son, Leo, in the pediatrician’s office on Mother’s Day and uploaded it to Facebook, she was looking for a few laughs (and probably some sympathy). The photo’s caption was, “Nothing says Happy Mother’s Day quite like a Sunday morning at the pediatrician’s.”

According to Slate.com, Kogan brought Leo to the doctor because he had a rash and a fever, and she feared strep. Leo was sent home with antibiotics, but the next day he was sicker and Kogan was back at the doctor. His new diagnosis was scarlet fever. Kogan continued posting pictures of Leo on Facebook to share with friends.

On the third day, Leo woke up so swollen and puffy that he was almost unrecognizable. Kogan sent pictures of her son to the doctor and posted one on Facebook. Before she heard from the doctor, Kogan got a call from Stephanie, a former neighbor and actress. Stephanie urged Kogan to bring Leo to the hospital; her own son had similar symptoms a few years earlier and was diagnosed with Kawasaki disease, a rare and sometimes fatal auto-immune disorder.

After receiving more comments and messages on Facebook from friends with the same suspicions, including a pediatrician and a pediatric cardiologist, Kogan brought Leo to the hospital. They were right: Leo had Kawasaki disease.

He will need tests on his heart every year for the rest of his life, but he is recovering and doing well.

Kogan, who originally joined Facebook to monitor the cyber-bullying of her oldest child, is grateful for how being part of a larger network of friends helped “diagnose” her son in a timely matter and also offered support during a difficult time. She recently wrote, “Thanks to my Facebook friends and their continuing support, I do not feel so alone.”

Do you have your own story about Kawasaki disease? Share your experience here.

Photograph by Deborah Copaken Kogan. Originally featured on Slate.

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Daily News Roundup

Monday, July 11th, 2011

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Report cards on kids’ weight don’t make a difference
Schools in California notified parents about unhealthy weight, but it didn’t have an impact, study finds.

6 ways to keep your kid from cursing
Eighty-six percent of parents agree that children ages 2 to 12 are cursing more today than when they themselves were children, according to a national survey commissioned by Care.com.

Secondhand Smoke Tied To Mental Health Problems In Kids: Study
Estimates suggest that anywhere between 4.8 and 5.5 million children in the U.S. live in households where they are exposed to secondhand smoke, putting them at greater risk for multiple health problems. Now, new research suggests that secondhand smoke exposure can increase the odds of developing certain mental and behavioral disorders by 50 percent.

100 Dead, Many Children, in Boat Sinking in Russia
More than 100 people, including many children, drowned when a riverboat filled with families cruising the Volga River sank over the weekend, rescue officials said Monday, conceding little hope remained of finding survivors.

How to talk to your kids’ doctor
Studies show you get only about 15 minutes of face time with your pediatrician during an average well visit, so you’ll want to make every second count.

Texas Woman Welcomes 16-Pound Baby Boy
A Texas mother possibly set a new state record after giving birth to a baby boy weighing more than 16 pounds, according to the Longview News-Journal.

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The Keys to a Good Doctor’s Visit

Monday, January 31st, 2011

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When you take your child for her well visit, do you leave the pediatrician’s office feeling like you got all the answers you’d hoped for?

Not always, right?

This was the basis for a story we published in our February issue, called “Make the Most of Your Child’s Checkup.” In it, we offer seven strategies every parent should consider before the appointment. They include:

Speak up right away. I know that I’ve been tempted to wait until the very end of the visit to bring up the things I’m concerned about (like the time my then 17-month-old seemed to be particularly preoccupied with specks on the ground). But the doctors we interviewed said that’s not the way to go. Kick off your visit with your questions and worries, and your doc will have the entire visit to keep an eye out for any problems, or to quell your fears altogether.

Show up as a team. Of course, it’s not always possible for you and your partner to come to a doctor’s visit. But when you can, do—pediatricians like getting input and perspective from both of you.

Bring your backup. Did you read or see something that made you worry about your child? Print out the article or study or TV transcript and show it to your doc. Simply saying “I heard that you’re not supposed to [common action here] anymore because [scary outcome here]” won’t help. Your doctor can only intelligently comment on something if you’ve provided the source.

Check out our story for more ideas. And good luck at your next appointment!

Image: Aimee Herring

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