Posts Tagged ‘ depression ’

Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, July 28th, 2011

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Coaches Can Play Big Role in How Kids Feel About Sports
A new study suggests that coaches who heed those pleas and give kids playing time and avoid pitting one kid against another may end up with more motivated players who stick with the game.

Cell Phones Don’t Seem to Pose Cancer Risk to Kids: Study
Children who use cell phones don’t seem to face an increased risk of brain cancer, compared to children who don’t use them, a new study contends.

Breastfeeding Problems Tied to Moms’ Depression
New moms who have particular difficulty breastfeeding may be at greater risk of postpartum depression, a new study suggests.

A Sleepaway Camp Where Math Is the Main Sport
As camps go, the Summer Program in Mathematical Problem Solving might sound like a recipe for misery: six hours of head-scratching math instruction each day and nights in a college dorm far from home.

Once Nearly 100%, Teacher Tenure Rate Drops to 58% as Rules Tighten
Under tougher evaluation guidelines that the city put into effect this year, 58 percent of teachers eligible for tenure received it, the mayor said at a news conference at the Department of Education. A decision on tenure was deferred for 39 percent of eligible teachers, up from 8 percent a year ago. Three percent of eligible teachers were denied tenure outright in both years.

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Daily News Roundup

Wednesday, November 3rd, 2010

Goody Blog Daily News RoundupSF supervisors pass ‘Happy Meal’ regulations:
City lawmakers on Tuesday approved legislation that they hope will force fast-food chains such as McDonald’s to make their children’s meals healthier or stop selling them with toys. [MSNBC]

Study: Half of teens who recover from depression relapse: Researchers have found that most depressed adolescents and teenagers who get treatment with drugs, therapy or both get some relief, but half will relapse withing five years. [MSNBC]

Fussy newborns may have more troubles later on: At just 1 month old, infants show signs of temperament troubles that can turn into mood and behavior problems later in life, a new study suggests. [MSNBC]

How to raise the men we’d want to marry: Until I had a son, I thought, well, naturally you want to raise your child — boy or girl — to have a full emotional life. Then I tried to. And I discovered that there’s a big difference between believing a boy should show his feelings freely and actually having a boy who does. [CNN]

At English-Mandarin public school, high test scores, but also strife: The school is the target of nine city investigations stemming from allegations that it compelled families to pay for after-school instruction, tampered with the city enrollment process, mismanaged its finances and manipulated surveys on parents’ satisfaction with the school. In addition, a series of anonymous, threatening letters directed at the principal and parent leaders prompted the parents association to budget $20,000 for legal assistance and stepped-up security. [New York Times]

Speaking to the identity of Chinese children in U.S.: Abby Newell’s adoptive parents have been preparing for her “birth tour” for years. They have attended Chinese culture camp in Silver Spring, decorated their Fairfax home like a Shanghai apartment and – most important, they say – enrolled Abby in Mandarin classes on the weekend. [Washington Post]

Montgomery County mom takes a poke at her peeps: Last year, out of her house in the Montgomery County town of Kensington, Sullivan launched a blog and a clothing line called Snoburbia to comment on the absurdities of the place she calls home. Though really, it could be Anyplace, USA – so long as Anyplace has elite lacrosse teams and e-mail discussion groups loaded with bragging parents. “Everywhere there are proud overachievers,” Sullivan says, “there is Snoburbia.” [Washington Post]

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Daily News Roundup

Monday, October 25th, 2010

British kids log on and learn math- in Punjab:
Three state schools in London outsource part of their teaching to India via the Internet through new online-based company BrightSpark.  Students can now have a one on one tutoring experience at half the price that a British tutor would charge. [New York Times]

Kids’ docs urged to screen new moms for depression: The Pediatrics Academy says that over 400,000 babies are born to depressed mothers each year, and that their conditions can affect their babies as well. Research shows developmental and social delays occur often in babies with depressed moms. [MSNBC]

Raisinets recalled over peanut risk: Nestle has recalled has recalled 10 oz. “fun size” bags sold to Target, Shoprite, and Don Quixote stores because they may contain peanuts. Nestle says the recall only applies to candy with the 02015748 production code and UPC number of 2800010255. [MSNBC]

40,000 drop-side cribs recalled for safety risk: The recalled Ethan Allen, Angel Line, and Victory Land Heritage Collection 3-in-1 cribs have drop-sides that can detach due to faulty hardware or wear and tear, according to the Consumer Product Safety Commission. This can create a gap where young children can be trapped or suffocated. In the past five years more than 9 million drop-side cribs have been recalled and caused at least 32 infant deaths since 2000. [CBS News]

First four months critical to new babies sleep habits: A new study in the journal Pediatrics finds that most babies will sleep five to eight hours per night by their fourth month of life. Many babies will sleep while the rest of the family is sleeping–50 percent of babies at age five months. [Paging Dr. Gupta/CNN]

Celery recall plant awaits results from FDA: The FDA linked four deaths to contaminated celery from a Texas plant. The state health department traced six of 10 known cases of listeriosis during an eight-month period to celery processed at the SanGar plant. On Wednesday the agency shut down the plant and ordered the company to recall all the produce that has passed through the plant since January. [MSNBC]

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Spankin’ New Headlines

Friday, March 19th, 2010

News Image NEWWhy your food labels may be lying to you. HealthDay

Fairness doesn’t come naturally—it’s learned behavior, according to new research. USA Today

More kids may be obese than experts had thought, finds a new study. Reuters

Depressed? How to lessen the effect it has on your kids. Los Angeles Times

More Americans are now living in multi-generational households, according to a new report. New York Times

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