Posts Tagged ‘ day care ’

Keep Children Safe in Child Care

Friday, April 12th, 2013

Earlier this week, I was honored to participate in a panel discussion at Child Care Aware of America’s Policy Symposium about the important role that parents play in advocating for improved safety and quality standards in child care centers and family child care homes. Vicky Doughterty (pictured with me), of Pennsylvania, shared her story of how her 17-month-old son, Warren, died after suffocating in an outdated and defective crib at a family child care home. Vicky has become a passionate advocate to help prevent other families from suffering a similar tragedy: Pennsylvania state law does not require that child-care providers have inspections before becoming licensed, and inspections of family child care homes are only conducted for a random sample of 15 percent of registered homes each year.

Kim Engelman’s 13-month-old daughter, Lexie, died as the result of an accident when she was left unsupervised in a child care home. Shocked to learn about the lack of regulations in her state, Kim fought for the passage in 2010 of Lexie’s Law in Kansas, which includes comprehensive safety and quality requirements. Certainly, caregivers can be loving and trustworthy, but they also need proper training and guidelines to follow.

Read our article, The Child-Care Crisis to learn more about how you can help improve child care for all children, and send a letter to your members of Congress as they consider reauthorizing the Child Care & Development Block Grant and strengthening minimum protections for children.

Child Care Aware just released its latest rankings of states’ child care regulations and oversight. Only 16 states address the basic health and safety requirements recommended by pediatricians. See your state’s ranking.

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Friday, January 18th, 2013

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Obama Evaluating Early Childhood Education Push In Second Term
Arne Duncan, President Barack Obama’s education secretary, has a slogan that summarizes his tenure and the view of his mission that he shares with his boss. “Education is the civil rights issue of our generation,” Duncan says. (via Huffington Post)

Duncan On Guns In Schools: Hard To Teach Kids Scared Of Being Killed
Too many students worry more about being killed by a gun than learning in the classroom, Education Secretary Arne Duncan said on Thursday, as he cautioned that firearms alone do not make schools safer. (via Huffington Post)

Potential to Prevent, Reverse Disabilities in Children Born Prematurely, Study Suggests
Physician-scientists at Oregon Health & Science University Doernbecher Children’s Hospital are challenging the way pediatric neurologists think about brain injury in the pre-term infant. (via Science Daily)

New Study Challenges Links Between Daycare and Behavioral Issues
A new study that looked at more than 75,000 children in day care in Norway found little evidence that the amount of time a child spends in child care leads to an increase in behavioral problems, according to researchers from the United States and Norway. (via Science Daily)

Wait to Remove Kids’ Infected Adenoids: Study
Removing the adenoids of kids who frequently get colds, sinus infections and laryngitis is more expensive and doesn’t lead to better health or fewer symptoms than a “watchful waiting” approach, according to new research. (via Reuters)

Obesity in Young Kids Dropped in NYC, Grew in LA
In the battle against childhood obesity, New York City appears to be doing better than Los Angeles, at least for low-income preschoolers. (via Fox News)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Wednesday, March 14th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Repeat C-section May Be Safer Option for Moms, Babies
For women who delivered their first baby by cesarean section, delivering a second baby also by C-section may be somewhat safer for both mother and baby than a vaginal birth, a new study reveals.

US Mortality Rates Dropped, Biggest Decline in Young Children
The risk of dying at any given age has dropped sharply over the last 75 years in the United States, with the most dramatic improvement seen among young children, according to a new government analysis of mortality rates.

Early Childhood Neglect Has Negative Impact on Kids
New research shows that children who spend the first two years of their life watching more television than engaging with books, toys and people are more likely to have long-term effects including delayed language skills and a brain that’s not wired for learning and development.

Can Playing Maternal Voice and Heartbeat Sounds Benefit Premies?
A new study suggests that premies may miss mom’s sounds by being born early.

Fatty Foods Linked to Poor Sperm Quality
A new study, published online in the European journal Human Reproduction, found that men who ate diets higher in saturated fat had lower sperm counts and concentration than men who consumed less fat. But men who consumed more omega-3 fatty acids — healthy fats found in fish and plant oils — had better formed sperm.

Kids Can’t See Anti-Bullying Film Due to R Rating
Kids, the very audience who would benefit most from seeing the new documentary “Bully,” aren’t allowed to see it without a parent or guardian. The film earned an R rating from the Motion Picture Association of America due to adult language.

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, February 16th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Arsenic Found in Organic Baby Food, Cereal Bars
You may think you’re being extra-healthy when you chose foods labeled “organic,” but some of these products contain arsenic, a compound that may increase the risk of cancer, a new study says.

Pregnant at Work? Why Your Job Could Be at Risk
Not all employers wish their pregnant employees well: the number of pregnancy-related discrimination charges have jumped by 35% in the past decade.

Day Care: Good Care Benefits Kids 30 Years Later — And Moms Too
Research has shown that high-quality early child care can have a significant impact on children’s well-being, and now a new study in the journal Child Development finds that it’s important for Mom too.

US Doctors ‘Firing’ Parents Who Refuse to Vaccinate Children
US pediatricians fed up with parents who refuse to vaccinate their children out of concern it can cause autism or other problems increasingly are “firing” such families from their practices, raising questions about a doctor’s responsibility to these patients.

How Child Abuse Primes the Brain for Future Mental Illness
Now, in the largest study yet to use brain scans to show the effects of child abuse, researchers have found specific changes in key regions in and around the hippocampus in the brains of young adults who were maltreated or neglected in childhood. These changes may leave victims more vulnerable to depression, addiction and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), the study suggests.

15-Minute-Old Newborn Gets Pacemaker for the Heart
The name Jaya in Hindi means victorious. And little Jaya Maharaj was just that, when she became one of the smallest recipients of a pacemaker when she was just 15 minutes old.

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Daily News Roundup

Monday, December 13th, 2010

Childhood: Sick in Day Care May Mean Healthier in SchoolGoody Blog Daily News Roundup
The Quebec Longitudinal Study of Child Development followed 1,238 Canadian children from 5 months old, in 1998, to 8 years, in 2006 and found that Children who started going to large-group care centers before age 2 ∏ had 61 percent more ear and respiratory infections with fever than those at home.  But, once they reached elementary school, they had 21 percent fewer respiratory infections and 43 percent fewer ear infections.  (New York Times)

Kids Not So Stuck on Sugary Breakfast Cereals, Study Finds
A study due to be released in Pediatrics this January revealed that children may be more likely to opt for cereals with less sugar if given the choice, and will even compensate for taste with fruit. (Mount Carmel Health)

Neighboring Apartments May Expose Kids to Cigarette Smoke
Kids who live in apartments have 45 percent more cotinine, a marker of tobacco exposure, in their blood than children who live in detached homes.   (Health Finder)
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