Posts Tagged ‘ daily news roundup ’

Parents Daily News Roundup

Wednesday, May 1st, 2013

Public School in Queens Adopts All-Vegetarian Menu, Becomes the First in NYC To Do So
A New York City elementary school has adopted an all-vegetarian menu, serving kids tofu wraps and veggie chili. Public School 244 is the first public school in the city to go all-veggie. The animal-welfare group People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals says it might be the first all-veggie public elementary school in the nation. (via Huffington Post)

Newtown Educators To Be Honored By Medal Of Honor Society
The Congressional Medal of Honor Society plans to honor the six educators killed in the December massacre at the Sandy Hook Elementary School in Connecticut with its highest civilian award. (via Huffington Post)

Researchers Successfully Treat Autism in Infants: Playing Games That Infants Prefer Can Lessen Severity of Symptoms
Most infants respond to a game of peek-a-boo with smiles at the very least, and, for those who find the activity particularly entertaining, gales of laughter. For infants with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), however, the game can be distressing rather than pleasant, and they’ll do their best to tune out all aspects of it — and that includes the people playing with them. (via Science Daily)

Twins Delivered 87 Days Apart
A woman in Ireland gave birth to twins 87 days apart, The Belfast Telegraph reported.
Dr. Eddie O’Donnell, a consultant obstetrician, said this birth was “probably the first of its kind” in Irish medical history and described the event as “extremely unusual.” (via Fox News)

NICU Treatments Linked to Intellectual Disabilities
Neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) interventions for babies born very small and early have drastically reduced infant deaths in the United States, but in doing so they’ve contributed to more intellectual disabilities, according to a new study. (via Reuters)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, April 11th, 2013

Preschool For All Plan in Obama Budget May Skip Some States
President Barack Obama’s “Preschool for All” initiative in his 2014 budget proposal is billed as a way to make sure every American child can attend preschool for free. Helping kids in their early years can ease achievement gaps and help them enter the workforce later on, the administration said. “This would constitute the largest expansion of educational opportunity in the 21st century,” Secretary of Education Arne Duncan said on a Wednesday call with reporters. (via Huffington Post)

Young Children Have Grammar and Chimpanzees Don’t
A new study from the University of Pennsylvania has shown that children as young as 2 understand basic grammar rules when they first learn to speak and are not simply imitating adults. The study also applied the same statistical analysis on data from one of the most famous animal language-acquisition experiments — Project Nim — and showed that Nim Chimpsky, a chimpanzee who was taught sign language over the course of many years, never grasped rules like those in a 2-year-old’s grammar. (via Science Daily)

Study Finds No Fertility Drug, Ovarian Cancer Link
Despite lingering concerns that using fertility drugs might raise a woman’s chances for later developing ovarian cancer, new research suggests the drugs don’t contribute any added risk. “One important message is women who need to use fertility drugs to get pregnant should not worry about using these fertility drugs,” said Dr. Albert Asante, lead author of the study and a clinical fellow in the division of reproductive endocrinology at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. (via Reuters)

How Childhood Hunger Can Change Adult Personality
The effects of going hungry in childhood may be more lasting than previously thought. Researchers studying people raised on Barbados who suffered severe starvation as infants found these adults were more anxious, less sociable, less interested in new experiences and more hostile than those who were well-nourished throughout childhood, according to a study published in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry. (via TIME)

Car Exhaust Linked to Childhood Cancers, Study Finds
Scientific experts have reams of data to show that the nation faces an epidemic of illnesses that are exacerbated by vehicle exhaust. These illnesses include cardiovascular disease, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), lung cancer and diabetes. The latest study, presented on April 8, 2013 at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) 2013 Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C., showed a possible link between exposure to traffic-related air pollution and several childhood cancers. (via Fox News)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Wednesday, April 10th, 2013

Month of Birth Impacts Immune System Development
Newborn babies’ immune system development and levels of vitamin D have been found to vary according to their month of birth, according to new research. (via Science Daily)

Obama Pre-K Expansion Battle Pits Kids Against Cigarettes
President Barack Obama’s 2014 budget pits education activists against the tobacco industry by proposing to help fund a new early childhood education program with a tax hike on tobacco. (via Huffington Post)

Breakfast Cereal Tied to Lower BMI for Kids
Regularly eating cereal for breakfast is tied to healthy weight for kids, according to a new study that endorses making breakfast cereal accessible to low-income kids to help fight childhood obesity. (via Reuters)

Babies of Blind Moms Excel in Vision Tests
Babies born to blind mothers have better visual attention and memory than their counterparts with seeing parents, new research suggests. The findings, published April 9 in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B, suggest that blind parents’ inability to respond to gaze and eye contact doesn’t harm their babies’ development. (via Fox News)

Michelle Obama Harper High School: First Lady to Visit Chicago School Impacted by Violence
First lady Michelle Obama is heading to Chicago to address a conference on gun violence and speak with students at a high school deeply affected by the bloodshed. With Congress poised to begin debate Thursday on firearms restrictions, the White House is mounting a vigorous push for action this week. (via Huffington Post)

British “Test Tube Baby” Pioneer Robert Edwards Dies
Robert Edwards, a British Nobel prize-winning scientist known as the father of in-vitro fertilization (IVF) for pioneering the development of “test tube babies”, died on Wednesday aged 87 after a long illness, his university said. Edwards, who won the Nobel prize for medicine in 2010, started work on fertilization in the 1950s, and the first so-called test tube baby, Louise Brown, was born in 1978 as a result of his research. (via Reuters)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Monday, April 8th, 2013

Four Employees Fired After Coelho Middle School Students Denied Lunch
A food service company spokesman said Friday it has fired four employees after about two dozen students at a Massachusetts middle school were denied lunches this week because their prepaid meal accounts ran low. (via Huffington Post)

Fetal Exposure to Excessive Stress Hormones in the Womb Linked to Adult Mood Disorders
Exposure of the developing fetus to excessive levels of stress hormones in the womb can cause mood disorders in later life and now, for the first time, researchers have found a mechanism that may underpin this process, according to research presented April 7 at the British Neuroscience Association Festival of Neuroscience (BNA2013) in London. (via Science Daily)

Dish Size, Meal Frequency May Affect Kids’ Weight
Shrinking the size of kids’ plates and bowls and encouraging them to eat more frequently throughout the day might help them eat less and keep off extra weight, new research suggests. (via Reuters)

Cursive Handwriting is Disappearing from Public Schools
The curlicue letters of cursive handwriting, once considered a mainstay of American elementary education, have been slowly disappearing from classrooms for years. Now, with most states adopting new national standards that don’t require such instruction, cursive could soon be eliminated from most public schools. (via The Washington Post)

Not All Screens Are Equal When It Comes to Obesity Risk: TV May Have Greatest Effect
Sitting in front of a screen can increase the risk of obesity, but TV seems to have a larger effect on weight than computers or video games. Computers, televisions, smartphones and tablets are all responsible for keeping more kids more sedentary and mesmerized by a screen, but a new study in Pediatrics found some surprising differences among these devices and their relationship to childhood obesity. (via TIME)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, March 5th, 2013

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Indiana Teacher Gun Threat? Lake Station Teacher On Leave Over ‘Guns’ Message On Chalkboard
A northwest Indiana teacher is the subject of a police probe over a threatening message he scrawled on the chalkboard of his classroom. (via Huffington Post)

Transgender Student Rights Would Be Guaranteed Under Proposed California Law
A California lawmaker has introduced legislation aimed at guaranteeing transgender students the right to use public school restrooms and participate on the sports teams that correspond with their expressed genders. (via Huffington Post)

Mom’s Placenta Reflects Her Exposure to Stress and Impacts Offsprings’ Brains
According to a new study by a research group from the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine, if a mother is exposed to stress during pregnancy, her placenta translates that experience to her fetus by altering levels of a protein that affects the developing brains of male and female offspring differently. (via Science Daily)

Is Baby Still Breathing? Is Mom’s Obsession Normal?
A new Northwestern Medicine® study found that women who have recently given birth have a much higher rate of obsessive-compulsive symptoms than the general population. (via Science Daily)

U.S. Baby’s Cure From HIV Raises Hope, New Questions
The remarkable case of a baby being cured of HIV infection in the United States using readily available drugs has raised new hope for eradicating the infection in infants worldwide, but scientists say it will take a lot more research and much more sensitive diagnostics before this hope becomes a reality. (via Reuters)

Michelle Obama: I Don’t Talk About Weight With My Daughters
Michelle Obama offered a peek inside the first family’s healthy habits on Monday, revealing there’s one thing they never talk about at home: weight. (via Today)

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Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, March 15th, 2011

Depressed Dads More Likely to Spank, Shortchange Kids: Study
Depressed dads are more likely to shortchange their children and use physical punishment, even on tots who are still crawling, new research suggests.A study involving fathers of 1-year-olds found they were more likely to spank and less likely to read to their youngsters than mentally healthy fathers. The finding adds more weight to the emerging awareness of “postpartum depression” among new fathers. [Yahoo News]

Mom’s Prenatal Stress Raises Child’s Disease Risk
 The children of women who experience a stressful life event either during or before pregnancy are at an increased risk of being hospitalized from infectious disease, according to a new study.  Children whose mothers experienced a stressful event, such as the death of a loved one or divorce, while they were pregnant were 71 percent more likely to be hospitalized with a severe infectious disease than children of women who did not undergo prenatal stress, said study researcher Nete Munk Nielsen, an epidemiologist at Statens Serum Institute in Denmark. [MSNBC]

Children Still Play the Old Schoolyard Favorites
Children still enjoy playing traditional games like skipping and clapping in the playground despite the lure of mobile phones, computer games, and television, a study published on Tuesday found. Playground games are “alive and well … they happily co-exist with media-based play, the two informing each other,” it said. [Yahoo News]

Updates Urged for Kids’ Heart, Breathing Rate Guidelines
Guidelines for children’s heart and breathing rate reference ranges need to be updated, say researchers who reviewed 69 studies that included a total of about 143,000 children. The review produced new reference ranges that differ widely from existing published guidelines, according to Dr. Matthew Thompson, of Oxford University in the United Kingdom, and colleagues. The reference ranges are used for assessing and resuscitating children. [Yahoo News]

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Daily News Roundup

Monday, March 14th, 2011

Goody Blog Daily News RoundupGene Tests Label Kids Sports Stars
Scientists have identified several genes that may play a role in determining strength, speed and other aspects of athletic performance.  Marketers have begun to sell genetic tests based on these findings online for up to $200. Some customers say the test results help them steer their children to appropriate sports. But skeptical doctors and ethicists say the tests are putting profit before science. [MSNBC]
 
Mom Guilt: 94 Percent of Us Have It.  Can We Ditch It for a Week?
BabyCenter declared last week “Guilt-Free Parenting Week. Guilt is the source of a campaign at Baby Center, which reports that 94 percent of moms surveyed feel parenting-related guilt. The challenge: live your life for a week with guilt-free parenting. [Today Moms]
 
Hot-to-Trot Ponies?  Dolls That Wax?  Toys Get Tarted Up
Toy manufacturers began following the marketing strategy “Kids Getting Older Younger” when they realized that toys marketed towards kids between the ages of 8 and 12 were attracting kids who were in the 3-year-old to 8-year-old age range because they wanted to emulate their older brothers and sisters. [Today Parenting]
 
Anesthesia For Kids Necessary, But Cognitive Danger?
An estimated 4 million children receive anesthesia every year, but little is known about their effects on the developing brain. A growing body of data from studies in animals suggests that these drugs could adversely affect neurologic, cognitive, and social development of neonates and young children. [Medical News Today]

Mexico Puts Its Children on a Diet
By all measures, and the obesity starts early. One in three children is overweight or obese, according to the government. So the nation’s health and education officials stepped in last year to limit what schools could sell at recess. [The New York Times]

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Daily News Roundup

Friday, March 11th, 2011

Goody Blog Daily News RoundupUnder Pressure, Firm Shutters Line That Made Tainted Wipes
A Wisconsin medical supplier that made millions of recalled alcohol prep products now blamed for serious infections and at least one death is shutting down the line that produces the wipes — at least for now. But the parents of two children harmed by infections blamed on contaminated Triad products said the move is too little, too late, and raises more questions about why government regulators haven’t taken stronger action against the firm. [MSNBC]

Coffee May Reduce Stroke Risk
Women in the study who drank more than a cup of coffee a day had a 22% to 25% lower risk of stroke than those who drank less, according to findings reported Thursday in Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association. Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the USA, behind heart disease and cancer. The findings add to the growing body of research showing coffee appears to have hidden health perks. A study done by Larsson in 2008 on men who drank coffee or tea had similar results. One of the most popular drinks in the world, coffee contains large amounts of antioxidants that improve health. Other research has suggested coffee can help prevent cognitive decline and can boost vision and heart health. It is also associated with a reduced risk of liver cancer. [USA Today]

Dog Kisses: Is  It Safe to Smooch with a Pet?
According to an article in WebMd, not even doctors and veterinarians agree about kissing a dog on the lips or vice versa. Thinking that dog’s tongue is clean is off base, says veterinarian William Craig, but don’t stop there. “Dog spit isn’t chemically cleansing. It turns out that it’s the dog’s rough tongue that helps to physically remove contaminants from an open wound” and likely the reason why many wounds do not get infected,” he told Pawnation. Craig adds “people tend to brush their teeth regularly and rinse with mouthwash. Dogs tend to lick themselves and eat things off the ground.” “Humans and dogs have different bacteria in their mouths,” explains Nelle Wyatt, a veterinary technician at the University of Tennessee Veterinary Medical Center. “Not all of the bacteria are capable of causing disease in the other species.” [USA Today]

Boy Toddlers Need Extra Help Dealing With Negative Emotions, Experts Urge
The way you react to your two-year-old’s temper tantrums or clinginess may lead to anxiety, withdrawal and behavior problems down the road, and the effect is more pronounced if the child is a boy who often displays such negative emotions as anger and social fearfulness, reports a new University of Illinois study. [Science Daily]

Passive Smoking Increases Risk of Stillbirth and Birth Defects, Study Suggests
Pregnant non-smokers who breathe in the second-hand smoke of other people are at an increased risk of delivering stillborn babies or babies with defects, a study led by researchers at The University of Nottingham has found. [Science Daily]

Teacher Who Twice Threw a Chair at 7th-Grader Tries to Clear Her Name
A longtime teacher at a Joliet junior high who last year “snapped” and twice threw a chair at a seventh-grade boy, striking him once in the head, is trying to clear her record so she can teach again. After Filak tried to get the boy to do his work, he instead told her to “leave me alone, fool,” witnesses said, according to a judge’s ruling that found the chair-throwing incident was child abuse. [Chicago Tribune]

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