Posts Tagged ‘ CPSC ’

Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, December 6th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

New Prenatal Test Could Improve Detection of Congenital Diseases
A new genetic test that analyzes fetal DNA in more detail than current prenatal tests can detect additional abnormalities, including those associated with autism and other intellectual disabilities, making them a potentially more accurate way of predicting disease risk. (via Time)

An Inadequate Diet During Pregnancy Predisposes the Baby to Diabetes
A study now insists on the importance of a healthy diet as a way of avoiding increased insulin and glucose levels in the child, both of which are indicators of diabetes and metabolic syndrome risk. (via ScienceDaily)

Baby Deaths Prompt CPSC to Sue Nap Nanny Maker
Makers of the popular Nap Nanny infant recliner seats, which have been tied to the deaths of five babies, have failed to do enough about the potential hazard, the Consumer Product Safety Commission said Wednesday. (via NBC News)

A Blood Test for Autism?
Earlier detection of autism, relying on markers in the blood, may help more children to take advantage of helpful behavioral therapies. (via Time)

Teen Fistfights Down in Many Nations, But Not US
Fistfights among children have become less common over the last decade in 19 out of 30 countries surveyed in a Canadian study – but fighting in the United States and Canada has remained steady. (via NBC News)

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Bumbo International Recalls 4 Million Bumbo Baby Seats

Wednesday, August 15th, 2012

Bumbo International and the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) have announced a recall of 4 million Bumbo Baby Seats in response to at least 50 incidents occurring between 2007 and now. Of the 50, 19 incidents involved reports of skull fractures, reports the CPSC.

The company issued a voluntary recall of 1 million of the seats in 2007, warning parents of the dangers of placing the seats on elevated surfaces such as tables, countertops, and chairs.

In November 2011, the CPSC issued additional warnings to parents, describing at least 45 serious head injuries caused by the seats designed to support babies learning to sit upright. The warning also reported of incidents that occurred when the Bumbo seats were placed on the floor or an unknown elevation.

The CPSC orders against any use of the seats until parents order a free repair kit offered by Bumbo International. The kit includes: a restraint belt (as shown in the image above), installation instructions, safe use instructions, and a new warning sticker, according to the site.

Watch the video below to learn how to properly use the Bumbo:

Visit our Parents recall page for more information.

Image: Bumbo seat with restraint belt repair (side view and top view), via cpsc.gov 

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, June 28th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Standing While Pregnant ‘May Slow Fetal Growth’
Researchers found that women who stood for the majority of time at work had babies whose heads were around 1cm smaller than average. (via BBC News)

Baby’s Birth Captured by MRI
German researchers have used Magnetic Resonance Imaging to peer inside a woman’s body during labor, a medical first that sheds light on the birth process. The researchers created the 30-second movie using cinematic MRI, a technique that strings together snapshots from deep inside the body. (via ABC News)

New Rule Aims to Prevent Deaths in Play Yards, Mesh Cribs
The Consumer Product Safety Commission voted to enact a tough new safety rule for play yards. The rule tightens testing for durability and stability, sets a minimum height requirement for the sides, and requires locking mechanisms to keep the products from collapsing on children. (via USA Today)

Continued Infertility Treatments Drive Pregnancy Success
Women in their 30s and 40s who undergo multiple infertility treatments may be nearly as likely to deliver a baby as women who conceive naturally, according to new research. (via ABC News)

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Increasing Safety Concerns Over the Bumbo

Friday, December 16th, 2011

Warnings and news stories continue to come out against the Bumbo seat, and Parents News Now blogger Holly Lebowitz Rossi recently wrote about a lawsuit against the company involving a 9-month-old who fractured his skull after falling out of the chair. In October 2007, Bumbo issued a voluntary recall of the chairs and though they remain on the market today, they carry a warning label advising parents not to use the product on elevated surfaces. More recently, in November 2011, the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) issued a release urging parents to use caution when using the Bumbo because serious head injuries continue to be documented despite the recall and warning label. These accidents have occurred when the seats were placed on chairs, countertops, tabletops, or other high surfaces, but also when used on the floor (cases have been reported of babies falling and hitting their heads on a hardwood floor or plastic toy). Children can fall out of the seats by arching their backs, leaning forward or sideways, or rocking.

 

Since the Bumbo is still sold in stores, we encourage you to take the following precautions if you have one in your house:

  1. Don’t use the Bumbo or similar seats on a tabletop, chair, countertop, or other elevated surface or on a hardwood floor.
  2. Keep your eyes on your baby at all times while he’s in the seat.
  3. Take your baby out of the seat as soon as he starts arching his back, leaning, or rocking in it.

 

What do you think? Should Bumbo be obligated to tweak its product so it’s safe, even when there’s no parental supervision? Or is it enough to put a warning label on the product and say it must be used with parental supervision? Do you own a Bumbo? Why or why not? Were you previously aware of these warnings, and have you ever left the room while your baby was in the seat?

 

Image from Bumbo.com

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, November 10th, 2011

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Penn State Scandal: How Parents Can Talk to Kids About Sex Abuse
As Penn State reels from a sex-abuse scandal that led Wednesday to the ousters of Joe Paterno, the winningest coach in major college football, and university president Graham Spanier, parents are left wondering whom to trust.

Programming for Children, Minus Cryptic Syntax
Adults have developed easy-to-understand programming tools to encourage children to create and collaborate on computers.

Online Program Doesn’t Help Kids Stay Slim
A series of interactive computer exercises designed to encourage healthy eating and physical activity didn’t keep middle schoolers in the Netherlands from gaining extra weight, according to a new study.

To Deter Risky UV Exposure, Appeal to Teens’ Vanity
The most effective method for reaching this demographic was using booklets, photographs and videos showing how the sun ages and damages skin.

Gov’t Issues Warning About High-Powered Magnets and Risk to Children
The government on Thursday warned about a growing problem with powerful ball-bearing magnets, such as those used in desktop toys for adults, and the risk they can pose to children.

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Crib Bumpers Now Banned in Chicago

Friday, September 9th, 2011

ss_101128633The babies of Chicago just got a little bit safer. Yesterday, the Windy City became the first to ban the sale of crib bumper pads due to the suffocation hazards they are known to pose, reports the Chicago Tribune.

Though bumpers are commonly marketed as stylish nursery decor, recent history indicates they are, in fact, a serious threat and can easily block a baby’s ability to breath. In fact, according to the Tribune, the  National Center for Child Death Review has received 14 reports of infant suffocation due to the presence of a bumper pad in the past 3 years.

City Council members James Balcer, and  George Cardenas said they are eager to get the message out that these popular accessories simply aren’t safe. “If we were to wait for federal regulators, it probably would never get done,” Balcer said. “We have a responsibility here as government to address issues like this.”

Indeed, Federal regulators have resisted taking a firm stance on the safety of bumper pads, and are reportedly ”trying to determine if there is a scientific link between bumper pads and suffocations, or if factors such as blankets, pillows or medical issues played a primary role in babies’ deaths.”  In fact, as we reported in March, the Tribune identified 17 cases of infant deaths that the Consumer Product Safety Commission failed to investigate when they were fully-aware that crib bumper pads played roles in the fatalities.

At the end of the day, most experts seem to agree, there should only be two things in your baby’s crib: a firm, tight-fitting mattress and a crib sheet. “It’s tempting to make it look cute and cozy with lots of blankets, stuffed animals, and pillows, but they’re all suffocation hazards for kids under 1 year old,” says Meri-K Appy, president of the Home Safety Council. The bottom line: the suffocation risk of bumper pads outweighs their benefits.

Share your thoughts on Chicago’s banning of crib bumpers. Are you hoping your city follows suit?

Read more about nursery safety, below, and be sure to keep up with the latest product recalls with our helpful Recall Finder on Parents.com.

Safe-Sleep Guide for Baby

The Safe Nursery

Repurpose Your Crib Bumpers

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CPSC Asks Parents to Stop Using Phil&Teds “Metoo” Chairs

Monday, May 9th, 2011

The Consumer Product Safety Commission is urging parents to immediately stop using phil&teds “meetoo” clip-on table top chairs due to serious fall and amputation hazards.

It’s an infant/toddler chair that has a nylon seat and a metal frame that attaches to tables using two metal clamps. The upper part of each clamp rests on the table top and has either a rubber clamp pad on its underside or a rubber boot covering it. The recalled “metoo” chairs do not have plastic spacers between the table clamps and the front horizontal metal bar. The clip-on chairs that have plastic spacers are being evaluated. The chair is sold in three colors – red, black and navy.

CPSC determined that when children move around in the chair or use their feet to push against other objects, the chair may detach and cause children to fall posing serious injury including head injury. In addition, inadequate space between the horizontal metal bar at the front of the chair and the clamps can brutally pinch, lacerate, crush or amputate fingers if caught.

Phil&teds has refused to the national recall although it has offered a repair kit that the CPSC has not approved. Tens of thousands of the chairs have been sold since May 2006 for about $50 through philandteds.com, Amazon.com, Buy Buy Baby, Target, Toys R Us, other online retailers and specialty stores.

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Child Deaths Prompt New Regulations for Window Blinds

Tuesday, April 26th, 2011

Could the window blinds in your home be posing a serious threat to your child’s safety? Unless they are cordless blinds, the answer is frighteningly, yes, according to a new article from the New York Times.

While in the past several years manufacturers have added safety features and provided parents with cautionary tips on their products, current statistics show that window blinds are still to blame for an average of one death per month due to strangulation by cords.

These grim statistics have motivated the Consumer Product Safety Commission to take action. The CPSC has stepped in and challenged the industry ”to devise a way to eliminate the risks from window cords or perhaps face mandatory regulations.” The Times reports that manufacturers have stepped up in reponse and are now working with a task force of regulators and consumer advocates, promising a fix by the fall.

While there is hope in this new convergence, unfortunately the manufacturers and consumer advocates have failed, thus far, to agree of what ‘safe’ really means. While blind manufacturers have offered several fixes to reduce risk, the task force stands firm that these efforts are not enough and the goal should not be to decrease risk but to eliminate it all together.

“It was my understanding that we were eliminating the hazard,” said Carol Pollack-Nelson, a safety consultant and member of the task force. “Now they are talking about reducing the hazard. We don’t want reduced strangulation. We want no chance of it.”

According to the Times, Ralph J. Vasami, executive director of the Window Covering Manufacturers Association, said it was unrealistic to expect the industry to eliminate every possible hazard. “Window blinds are not children’s products, he said, nor are they defective.” He goes on to imply that it’s a parent’s responsibility to take precaution around such products in order to keep their children safe and urges parents of young children to install cordless shades if they have concerns.

 While the task force suggests ceasing the production of any blinds except cordless is an obvious solution to solving the problem entirely, manufacturers point out that cordless styles are more difficult to produce than corded blinds and can cost twice as much to make.

While Vasami predicts the number of deaths “will inevitably decline as older products are replaced by those with more safety features,” parents who have tragically lost a child to cord strangulation are taking a more assertive approach. One couple recently founded the Parents for Window Blind Safety, while all agree that anything that can be done to prevent another family from enduring the pain they have gone through is worth whatever it takes.

Share your thoughts on this issue. Do you think manufacturers are correct in their assertion that parents are ultimately responsible for keeping their children safe, regardless of the overall safety of a product— or do you side with the task force and believe it’s a manufacturer’s job to provide completely hazard-free products, no matter the cost?

Be sure to keep your family safe and find information on the very latest product recalls with our Recall Finder on Parents.com.

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