Posts Tagged ‘ children ’

Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, April 4th, 2013

Woman sues Ohio clinic over failed abortion after delivering healthy ‘miracle’ baby
An Ohio woman is suing an abortion clinic after she says she made the painful decision to terminate her pregnancy because her life was in danger, only to discover she was still pregnant after the procedure. (via Fox News)

Indiana Bill Would Require Armed Guards In Schools
The National Rifle Association on Tuesday released its long-awaited “National School Shield Report,” a lengthy document that recommends that schools arm and train staff members who want to carry guns. (via Huffington Post)

Drinking, drugs more common for kids of deployed
Teens and preteens with a parent deployed in the military may be more likely to binge drink or misuse prescription drugs, according to a new study. (via Yahoo News)

Parents jailed for deaths of 6 children in UK fire
A judge has sentenced the father of six British children who died in a house fire to life, with a minimum of 15 years in prison, describing him as the “driving force” behind setting the blaze. (via Fox News)

Department of Education announces that 20 new schools will open in the Bronx next fall
Bronx high schoolers can prepare for careers in health care and software design at two new schools set to open in September. (via NY Daily News)

Police believe couple abducted their children from grandmother
Police believe a Louisiana man abducted his two young sons early Wednesday after breaking into the Florida home of the children’s grandmother and tying her up. (via CNN)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, April 2nd, 2013

Nao The Robot Teacher Becomes Newest Edition To Kansas School’s Teaching Staff 
The Career and Technical Education Academy in Hutchinson, Kan., has hired a new teacher who may fit in perfectly at an institution with such a technological name. The Hutchinson News reports Nao, a robot teacher, has arrived mid-year at the high school but is already making a big impact. (via Huffington Post)

The Real Long-Term Effects Of Adderall Use
Overachieving students are popping Adderall and other drugs to stay focused and get ahead. But how does this habit affect them long term? (via Huffington Post)

Student Sues School, Says Bullying Attack Leaves Him Disabled
An Iowa teenager is suing his school district and several administrators because he says they didn’t do enough to protect him from bullying and an assault that left him permanently disabled. (via Huffington Post)

After “Tan Mom,” New Jersey bans children from tanning beds
New Jersey Governor Chris Christie signed a bill into law on Monday banning children under 17 from using commercial tanning beds, a move stemming from the case of a local woman accused of taking her 5-year-old daughter into a tanning booth. (via Reuters)

‘What Color is Monday?’ A look at life with autism
New statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show an increase in the number of children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders – one in 50 – up from previous estimates of one in 88. (via Fox News)

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What To Do With Your Kids’ Outgrown Shoes

Thursday, October 4th, 2012

Is your little one outgrowing her shoes so quickly that you now have a pile of sneakers she no longer wants or needs? Instead of throwing them away, consider donating them to the “Big Hearts, Little Shoes” initiative instead. This shoe drive is a joint effort between The Little Gym, a chain of learning and physical development centers for kids, and Soles4Souls, the world’s largest provider of shoes to families in need. Outgrown shoes can be dropped off at Little Gym locations, even if your child does not attend classes there. And don’t worry if the shoes are worn out from lots of playtime, because Soles4Souls will still find a use for them by recycling the materials. This way, you clear off some extra space on the family shoe rack and children in need benefit from your donation. Plus, your kids will learn about charity and helping others. It’s a win-win. Find your nearest drop-off location and start spreading the love now.

Photo courtesy of The Little Gym.

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Buckle Up!

Thursday, August 9th, 2012

It’s 6:00 p.m., and your daughter has soccer practice on the other side of town. As you gather her gear and frantically load the car, take a few extra minutes to be sure she is safely secured.

While it might seem obvious, a new study released in the American Journal of Preventative Medicine earlier this week found that only 3 percent of 1- to 3-year-olds and 10 percent of 8- to 10-year-olds were properly restrained in a car. Although car crashes are the leading cause of death for children over age 3, researchers say parents just aren’t used to adhering to the new regulations set in recent years.

So what’s the best way to keep your child safe in a vehicle?

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that children should sit in rear-facing seats until age 2, while toddlers should sit in front-facing seats with harnesses until they exceed the seat’s weight and height. And as your child continues to grow, the APA recommends using a booster seat until your bid kid is at least 57 inches tall.

Think you’ve got it figured out? Try taking our latest quiz on child car seat regulations here so you can make sure you’re ready for the road ahead.

Image: Woman helping a girl to fasten her seat belt in a car via Shuttershock

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, July 24th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Survival Rates for Premies Are Better Than Previously Reported
Premature babies are more likely to survive when they are born in high-level neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) than in hospitals without such facilities. Pediatric researchers who analyzed more than 1.3 million premature births over a 10-year span found that the survival benefits applied not only to extremely preterm babies, but also to moderately preterm newborns. (via Science Daily)

Severely Obese Babies: Hearts Already in Danger
Heart disease is normally associated with middle age, but the early warning signs were detected in children between the ages of two and 12. Two-thirds of the 307 children studied had a least one early symptom such as high blood pressure. (via BBC)

Social Deprivation Has a Measurable Effect On Brain Growth
Severe psychological and physical neglect produces measurable changes in children’s brains, finds a study led by Boston Children’s Hospital. But the study also suggests that positive interventions can partially reverse these changes. (via Science Daily)

After 30 Years, Unintended Birth Rate Still Almost 40 Percent
About 37 percent of births in the United States are the result of unintended pregnancies, a proportion that has remained fairly steady since 1982, according to new research from the National Center for Health Statistics, a branch of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (via ABC)

Childhood Obesity Linked to Cancer Risk
According to the American Heart Association, one in three children and teenagers are now considered overweight or obese. There is a growing recognition of health problems associated with extra pounds, including the risk of diabetes, heart disease, and joint and muscle pain. (via Science Daily)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, July 19th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Is Early Potty Training Harmful?
Many experts’ recommendations to get children out of diapers before age three can be dangerous for some children. A child’s bladder, which continues growing to its standard size until age three, grows stronger and faster when it’s filling and emptying uninhibited. You interrupt that process when you train early, one expert claims. (via ABC News)

US Panel: Improve Child Custody Rules for Military
A national legal panel that works to standardize state laws wants to simplify child custody rules for military service members, whose frequent deployments can leave them without clear legal recourse when family disputes erupt. (via Associated Press)

Lack of Exercise Is a Global Pandemic, Researchers Say
Lack of exercise causes as many as 1 in 10 premature deaths around the world each year — roughly as many as smoking, researchers say. This global pandemic is largely due to four major diseases: heart disease, Type 2 diabetes, breast cancer, and colon cancer. (via TIME)

Study Reveals How Some Kids Can Overcome Egg Allergies
Giving children with egg allergies small, and then increasingly higher, doses of the very food they are allergic to may eliminate, or at least reduce, reactions, a new study shows. (via MSNBC)

Mothers Who Use Fertility Drugs May Have Shorter Kids
A new study from Australia found boys whose mothers used fertility drugs were on average 1 inch shorter at ages 3 to 10, compared with boys of mothers who did not use the drugs. (via Fox News)

Breastfeeding Tied to Kids’ Nut Allergies in New Study, But Not All Agree
Australian researchers claim children who are exclusively breastfed for their first six months have a greater risk for developing a nut allergy than those given other foods or fluids, either exclusively or in combination with breast milk. (via Huffington Post)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, July 17th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Assault: Children With Disabilities Are More Likely to Be Victims of Violence, Analysis Shows
Children with disabilities are almost four times more likely to be victims of violence than other children, according to a new report commissioned by the World Health Organization. The report, published in The Lancet on Thursday, found that disabled children were 3.6 times more likely to be physically assaulted and 2.9 times more likely to be sexually assaulted. (via NY Times)

Girls as Young as 6 Want to be ‘Sexy,’ Study Says
Most girls as young as 6 are already beginning to think of themselves as sex objects, according to a new study of elementary school-age kids in the Midwest. The study, published online July 6 in the journal Sex Roles, also identified factors that protect girls from objectifying themselves. (via MSNBC)

Women Beat Men on IQ Tests For First Time
New research is providing an answer to the age-old, delicate question: who is smarter, men or women? A new study has come down on the feminine side of that argument, finding that women now score higher on IQ tests than men. (via ABC News)

Tooth Fillings Made With BPA Tied to Behavior Issues
Kids who get dental fillings made using BPA are more likely to have behavior and emotional problems a few years later, according to a new study. (via Fox News)

Cord Blood Stem Cells Restore Toddler’s Hearing
Madeleine, 2, became the first child to undergo an experimental hearing loss treatment through an FDA-approved trial at Memorial Hermann-Texas Medical Center that infused stem cells from her own banked cord blood into her damaged inner ear. Within the last six months, Connor says she’s seen a dramatic improvement in Madeleine’s ability to hear. (via Yahoo!)

Study Links Child Abuse to Home Foreclosures
Researchers found just under a 1 percent increase in the number of general physical abuse cases reported at 38 pediatric hospitals every year between 2000 and 2009 and a more than 3 percent rise in the number of traumatic brain injuries seen in babies. (via MSNBC)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Monday, July 16th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Study: Breast-Feeding Keeps Women Thinner, Even Decades Later
While breast-feeding is touted partly as a way to help new mothers lose weight, it may help keep their weight down even decades later, a new study from England suggests. (via MSNBC)

Strength Training Key in Preventing Alzheimer’s
Studies presented at this year’s Alzheimer’s Association International Conference found that resistance training was particularly beneficial for improving the cognitive abilities of older adults. (via CNN)

Adopt These Three Habits to Lose Weight
Three habits are key to weight loss and sustained weight control, a new study finds. Women in the study who were most successful at losing weight kept track of their food intake in a journal, didn’t skip meals and avoided eating out, especially for lunch. (via MSNBC)

Questionnaire Completed by Parents May Help Identify One-Year-Olds at Risk for Autism
A new study by University of North Carolina School of Medicine researchers found that 31 percent of children identified as at risk for autism spectrum disorders (ASD) at 12 months received a confirmed diagnosis of ASD by age 3 years. (via CNN)

Study: More TV Linked to Larger Waists and Weaker Legs for Kids
The more television a child watches, even in the first years of life, the more likely he or she is to be thicker around the middle and less muscularly fit, according to a new study. (via ABC News)

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