Posts Tagged ‘ chapter books ’

5 New Children’s Books to Check Out

Friday, June 13th, 2014

A few weeks ago, I took my 11-year-old daughter, Katie, to BookExpo America in New York City, where many adult and children’s publishers have their latest titles plus sneak peeks of upcoming ones for fall and winter. Our fave finds:

Frozen Hide-And-Hug Olaf

It’s Disney’s version of Elf on the Shelf. The box contains a new Frozen story with a hide-and-seek theme, and a plush Olaf that parents are supposed to hide for kids to find (and hug). It will be available at the end of October; here’s a link for pre-order.

A World Without Princes

This is the second part of a chapter-book triology called the School for Good and Evil. It’s perfect for 8- to 12-year-olds, especially those who are fans of fantasy fiction. The kids who reviewed the first book in the series for Parents Best Books story last year loved it, and it was a close runner-up for the Best Chapter Book. (In fact, it was Katie’s top choice.) We had a chance to meet the author, Harvard-educated, Soman Chainani, who says he wrote the series because “growing up he watched a lot of Disney movies and felt that the good characters weren’t always the most interesting ones.” Both books are available now; my daughter says the second one is even better than the first.

Sisters

Over at the Scholastic booth, Katie was drawn to advance copies of this graphic novel paperback. She recognized the name of the author (Raina Telgemeier) because she had read Smile, a story that Raina wrote in 2010. Katie finished the book before we left New York City: Sisters is a breezy (yet satisfying) read about siblings who patch up their relationship. It’s coming out at the end of August; pre-order here.

JoJo’s First Word Book

Once we got past the crowds waiting to see Grumpy Cat in the Chronicle Books book, we were struck by the adorableness of this title. It features more than 200 objects and a carrying handle. You can watch a video about it here or buy it here.

Kid Presidents

We’re fans of non-fiction, and this chapter book for kids 8 to 12 is so clever, delivering quirky childhood stories from 16 presidents. (For instance, kids will learn that FDR’s mom followed him everywhere and that Harry Truman broke a collarbone while combing his hair.) It will be available in October; pre-order here.

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Keep on Reading! Children’s Book Week (May 7-13)

Wednesday, May 9th, 2012

Children's Book Week 2012 poster David WeisnerIt’s Children’s Book Week, which means this week is another special reason to encourage your kids to read!  This celebration of books (sponsored by the Children’s Book Council and Every Child a Reader) officially began in 1919, though the idea was originally formulated in 1913 by Franklin K. Matthiews, the librarian of the Boy Scouts of America.  To date, this week is considered the longest-running literacy program in the U.S. (Read more about the history at bookweekonline.com)

Each year, events with children’s book authors and illustrators are also sponsored across the country.  Find a 2012 event at a city near you.  You can also request a free copy of this year’s Children’s Book Week poster by David Wiesner (“Art & Max,” “Flotsam,” and “The Three Pigs”) and download a free Children’s Book Week bookmark by Lane Smith (“It’s a Book,” “Grandpa Green,” and “Madam President”).

Since spring and rain are on my mind (it’s been endless wet weather in New York), here are some new and old spring-related books that are perfect for the season:

Gem by Holly Hobbie – The author/illustrator of the “Toot and Puddle” series showcases her superb watercolors in this (mostly) wordless book about a frog and a young girl’s discovery of the world.

And Then It’s Spring by Julie Fogliano – Spare and poetic as a haiku, this first-time author focuses on a boy waiting for his garden to bloom.  Subdued illustrations by Erin E. Stead, who won the 2011 Caldecott Medal for “A Sick Day for Amos McGee,” are a perfect accompaniment.

Green by Laura Vaccaro Seeger – A tribute to nature and the environment, Seeger shares the different  shades of green that exist in the world, along with scenes of what a world would be like without green.  Strategic cut-outs on each page also give a hint of what will come next.

The Curious Garden by Peter Brown – Inspired by the High Line in New York City, this story follows a little boy as he plants a rooftop garden with the hope of transforming a dark and dreary world into something bright and bold. (Brown’s signature drawings are detailed, lush, and vibrant.)

Yellow Umbrella by Dong Il Sheen and Jae-Soo Liu – Gentle sounds of rain from the accompanying CD pulls you through this wordless book, which follows a yellow umbrella as it travels through a sea of dark and colorful umbrellas.

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“Book People Unite” — Pinocchio and Jack Black Want You to Support Reading

Wednesday, April 18th, 2012

This cute and catchy music video came across my inbox yesterday and I’ve watched it at least three times.  If you love books and reading as much as I do, you will also love this video from Reading Is Fundamental (RIF), the largest non-profit children’s literacy organization.  RIF just launched the national ”Book People Unite” campaign to encourage book lovers to band together, and this Public Service Announcement features an original song produced by The Roots.

A montage of assorted puppets (by Jim Henson’s Creature Shop) and animations (by Curious Pictures) of beloved book characters (Pinocchio, Curious George, Babar, Humpty Dumpty, Clifford, Raggedy Ann and Andy, and Madeline) are all seen or heard singing ”Book People Unite.”  Famous musicians and celebrities such as Chris Martin from “Coldplay,” John Legend, Regina Spektor, and Jack Black also contribute vocals for the characters or make appearances alongside them. LeVar Burton, who hosted “Reading Rainbow,” also makes a cameo. (NYTimes.com also has a feature-length piece about the video.)

Last year, RIF provided 14 million books to 4 million children, and the non-profit hopes to give more books to the 16 million children living in poverty in our country.  To show your support for literacy, sign the “Book People Unite” reading pledge and receive a free download of the song.

Can you spot all the book characters or match them to the celeb voices?

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Celebrate National Reading Month with Cheerios

Tuesday, March 27th, 2012

Cheerios Spoonsful of StoriesBefore March ends, make sure to encourage bring your little bookworm to the library since March is National Reading Month.

To help promote a love for reading, Cheerios is celebrating the 10-year anniversary of its Spoonfuls of Stories program, which places one free book written by award-winning authors inside specially-marked cereal boxes.  This year, six different books (with English and Spanish versions) will be distributed together:

  • Peeny Butter Fudge, by Toni and Slade Morrison and illustrated by Joe Cepeda
  • Mostly Monsterly, by Tammi Sauer and illustrated by Scott Magoon
  • Noodle & Lou, by Elizabeth Garton Scanlon and illustrated by Arthur Howard
  • If I Were a Jungle Animal, by Amanda Ellery and illustrated by Tom Ellery
  • Hello Baby, by Mem Fox and illustrated by Steve Jenkins
  • Can I Just Take a Nap?, by Ron Rauss and illustrated by Rob Shepperson

Since 2002, Cheerios has distributed 60 million books in boxes and donated $3.8 million to First Book, a non-profit dedicated to improving literacy for low-include families by providing them their first new books.  This year, Cheerios will  be giving 50,000 children’s books and $300,000 to First Book.

You can also donate to First Book through your mobile phones by using short code 20222 and texting Books2Kids.  By doing so, a $5 donation will be made  that will provide two new books to a child in need.  Standard messaging rates apply, and the donation amount will appear on your cell phone bill. Parents can also find other book-related events sponsored by Cheerios near you.

Happy reading!

More about books and reading on Parents.com

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2012 Newbery and Caldecott Award Winners

Thursday, January 26th, 2012

If you’re looking to add new reads to your child’s bookshelf, consider these two distinguished winners of this year’s Newbery and Caldecott awards. The books were announced by the American Library Association (ALA) this week.

John Newbery Medal (outstanding contribution to children’s literature): “Dead End in Norvelt” by Jack Gantos, published by Farrar, Straus & Giroux.  In this YA novel, a boy named Jack Gantos (same name as the author) is grounded but his life then changes over two months when a neighbor offers him a job of typewriting obituaries.

Randolph Caldecott Medal (distinguished American picture book for children):  “A Ball for Daisy,” illustrated and written by Chris Raschka, published by Schwartz & Wade Books (imprint of Random House Children’s Books). A story told without words, the book follows a playful dog named Daisy as her favorite ball is ”lost” but then “returned” to her.

Find out the honorary mentions and the winners of other awards.

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Join Our Raise a Reader 2011 Program — Win $5,000 for Your School Library

Monday, October 3rd, 2011

Get your kids reading and on their way to become bookworms!  This year, Parents magazine and Parents.com partnered with the National Association of Elementary School Principals (NAESP) for our second Raise a Reader program.

Two contests are running simultaneously as part of the Raise a Reader program, the School Challenge and the Family Challenge. The School Challenge is open to parents with school-age kids, and the school with the highest reading minutes will win $5,000 for the library.  The Family Challenge is open to parents with and without school-age kids, and 50 kids with the highest reading minutes will win $50 gift cards.

FOR THE SCHOOL CHALLENGE:

1-      Between October 1-30, 2011, school administrators and teachers can register their school for the program at parents.com/reading/school/signup

2-      Starting November 7, 2011, parents must begin registering their individual kids into to the program.  Parents can register at parents.com/reading/ and start tracking their children’s extracurricular reading minutes.  Only 100 minutes maximum can be entered each day. Students can be enrolled any time until January 30, 2012, when the contest ends.

3-      When parents register their kids, they must add a school in order to be a participant in the program.  Parents with school-age kids who participating in the School Challenge are automatically enrolled in the Family Challenge.

FOR THE FAMILY CHALLENGE:

1-      Starting November 7, 2011, parentswithout school-age children also register their individual kids into the program.  Parents can register at parents.com/reading/ and start tracking their children’s extracurricular reading minutes.  Only 100 minutes maximum can be entered each day. Kids can be enrolled any time until January 30, 2012, when the contest ends.

2-      When parents register their kids, they are automatically enrolled into the Family Challenge.

 

View frequently asked questions here and full contest rules here. Get your child’s school involved today!

More About Reading on Parents.com

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March 9 Is ‘World Read Aloud Day’

Wednesday, March 9th, 2011

books-twokidsWant to join the global movement for literacy?

Startling statistics from LitWorld.org states that almost 1 billion people around the world today still can’t read or write, and that 171 million children could overcome poverty if they learned to write and read in school.  

To share how power of words to change the world, LitWorld is making today World Read Aloud Day.  World Read Aloud Day “motivates children, teens, and adults worldwide to celebrate the power of words, especially those words that are shared from one person to another, and creates a community of readers advocating for every child’s right to a safe education and access to books and technology.”

Since last year, LitWorld has advocated for reading and writing in over 35 countries through 40,000 people who partcipated in sharing the word.  This year, LitWorld invites you to continue sharing the importance of literacy in several ways: reading with your kids and family,  joining a reading event at your local library or in your community, or stopping by Times Square in New York  City for a 24-hour Read Aloud Marathon.

More about reading on Parents.com

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2011 Newbery and Caldecott Award Winners

Wednesday, January 12th, 2011

Growing up, I remember looking–with reverance–at books branded with silver and gold Newbery and Caldecott medals.  I knew those books were extra special, awarded by the American Library Association as being the best of the best in written (Newbery) and illustrated (Caldecott) children’s books.  

This week, the ALA press release announced their winners of this year’s Newbury and Caldecott medals:

John Newbery Medal (outstanding contribution to children’s literature): “Moon over Manifest,” written by Clare Vanderpool, is the 2011 Newbery Medal winner. The book is published by Delacorte Press, an imprint of Random House Children’s Books, a division of Random House, Inc. (Click here for more book award winners.)

Randolph Caldecott Medal (distinguished American picture book for children):  “A Sick Day for Amos McGee,” illustrated by Erin E. Stead, is the 2011 Caldecott Medal winner. The book was written by Philip C. Stead, and is a Neal Porter Book, published by Roaring Brook Press, a division of Holtzbrinck Publishing. (Click here for more book award winners.)

 

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What were your favorite children’s books growing up? What books do your kids like to read?
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