Posts Tagged ‘ cervical cancer ’

Parents Daily News Roundup

Friday, March 8th, 2013

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

‘The Most Fabulous Story Ever Told’ Protested By Pioneer Valley Performing Arts School’s Parents
The Daily Hampshire Gazette reported that Scott Goldman, head of school at the Pioneer Valley Performing Arts School received emailed petitions and phone calls protesting the school’s planned performance of Paul Rudnick’s award-winning 1998 play later this month. (via Huffington Post)

U.S. Childhood Obesity Fight Sees Some Success: Group
U.S. companies and other groups that have made attempts to reverse the nation’s rising childhood obesity rate are starting to see results as more American kids exercise and have better access to healthy foods, they said on Thursday. (via Reuters)

Less-frequent Pap Smears May Miss Cancer Precursors
Certain types of cervical abnormalities that can lead to cancer may be missed when young women go years between Pap smears, a new study suggests. (via Reuters)

In Arkansas, Challenges Expected for Nation’s Strictest Abortion Law
Abortion rights groups say they plan to challenge a new Arkansas law adopted on Wednesday that will prohibit most abortions after about 12 weeks of pregnancy and is the most restrictive abortion law in the United States. (via Reuters)

Kids on Food Stamps Don’t Eat Any Healthier: Study
Children whose families are on food stamps are just as likely to be overweight and obese as other low-income youth, a new study suggests. (via Reuters)

Mom Bloggers Petition to Rid Kraft Mac & Cheese of Artificial Coloring
Two food blogging moms from North Carolina are petitioning Kraft to stop artificially coloring the cheese mix in its macaroni and cheese product. (via Fox News)

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10 Celebrities Who Used Surrogates to Conceive

Friday, February 22nd, 2013

This post was written by our friends at Celebrity Baby Scoop.

CelebrityBabyScoop is taking a look at 10 celebrities who have used a surrogate mother to expand their families. From Elton John, to Nicole Kidman, to Giuliana Rancic, to Sarah Jessica Parker, hear how gestational carriers have helped change the lives of some high-profile families.

Elton John
Sir Elton John and David Furnish welcomed their second son Elijah on January 11, 2013. The doting daddies used the same surrogate mother for their 2-year-old son Zachary.

“She is a wonderful, kind and loving woman,” Elton said of their surrogate, who thinks of her as “part of our family.”

The couple used the same egg donor for both boys and have chosen not to find out either of their son’s paternity.

Nicole Kidman
Nicole Kidman and Keith Urban welcomed daughter Sunday on July 8, 2008. But after a “roller-coaster ride with fertility,” the couple used a gestational carrier for their second child, now 2-year-old daughter Faith.

“Having given birth and then being there to see my child born in that way, I felt so much love for our surrogate, gestational carrier,” Nicole said.

The Academy Award-winner went on to discuss why she uses the term “gestational carrier” as opposed to “surrogate” – something she was criticized for in the days following the announcement of Faith’s birth.

“We were trying to be accurate,” she shared. “The term ‘gestational carrier’ is used if it’s your biological child and if it isn’t, then you use ‘surrogate.’ I mean, who knows what it is. But she’s the most wonderful woman to do this for us.”

Elizabeth Banks
What to Expect When You’re Expecting actress Elizabeth Banks and husband Max Handelman have welcomed both sons – Felix, nearly 2, and Magnus, 3 months – via surrogate mother.

“Like Felix, Magnus was born via gestational surrogate,” she shared. “This experience has exceeded all expectations, taught us a great deal about generosity and gratitude, and established a relationship that will last a lifetime. I am also so very thankful to our family and friends for their support throughout this process, as well as the Center for Surrogate Parenting for helping make all this possible.”

“It was a womb issue for me. Embryos wouldn’t implant,” she said of her fertility issues. “It’s a big leap, inviting this person into your life to do this amazing, important thing for you. And it’s hard losing that kind of control. But our surrogate is so extraordinary, and she’s still in our lives. She’s like an auntie.”

Neil Patrick Harris
How I Met Your Mother star Neil Patrick Harris and partner David Burtka are dads to 2-year-old twins Harper and Gideon. The Doogie Houser alum opened up about welcoming the twins via surrogate mother.

“We really, really wanted kids,” NPH said. “We really had thought it through financially, emotionally, relationship-wise. We didn’t just accidentally get pregnant and decide that now we need to make this work. These kids come into our world with nothing but love.”

The handsome couple talked the science behind the birth of the fraternal twins, revealing each father fertilized one egg and the twins were carried and born via one surrogate.

Burtka explained that the twins were conceived by “two eggs, two embryos, one of mine, one of his.”

The couple knew the surrogate, whom Burtka described as “more like the oven.” And they found an anonymous egg donor through a donation bank where they were able to research her personal and medical history.

(more…)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Friday, January 4th, 2013

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Single-Sex Schools Have Negative Impact on Kids, Says Study
Boys and girls may be opposites, but new research shows that in the classroom, separating the two sexes may not be the best way for either gender to learn and grow. (via ABC News)

Women Getting Unneeded Paps Post-Hysterectomy
Many women don’t need to be screened for cervical cancer after a hysterectomy, but a new study says most get the test anyway. (via NBC News)

Is the Medical Community Failing Breastfeeding Moms?
When women have trouble breast-feeding, they’re either prodded to try harder by well-meaning lactation consultants or told to give up by doctors. They’re almost never told, “Perhaps there’s an underlying medical problem—let’s do some tests.” (via TIME)

Obama Administration Okays More Health Insurance Marketplaces
Injecting a rare shot of bipartisanship in the nation’s contentious health care overhaul, the Obama administration cleared four Republican-led states to build their own consumer-friendly insurance markets on Thursday. (via NBC News)

An Embryo That Is Neither Male nor Female: Impact of Three Unexpected Sex Determination Factors Analyzed
So, is it a girl or a boy? This is the first question parents ask at the birth of an infant. Though the answer is obvious, the mechanism of sex determination is much less so. Researchers at the University of Geneva (UNIGE) attempt to shed light on this complex process by identifying the crucial role played by insulin and IGF1 and IGF2 growth factors, a family of hormones known for its role in metabolism and growth. (via ScienceDaily)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, September 13th, 2011

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Mississippi Voters Can Decide ‘Personhood’ of the Unborn, Court Rules
Voters in Mississippi will be given a chance to decide whether life begins at conception, a controversial abortion-related ballot initiative that the state’s highest court has refused to block.

In Study, Fatherhood Leads to Drop in Testosterone
Testosterone, that most male of hormones, takes a dive after a man becomes a parent. And the more he gets involved in caring for his children — changing diapers, jiggling the kid on his knee, reading “Goodnight Moon” for the umpteenth time — the lower his testosterone drops.

Study: IUD’s Lower Cervical Cancer Risk
Intrauterine devices (IUDs) prevent unwanted pregnancies, and as an added benefit they may also help protect against cervical cancer, according to a new study in the Lancet Oncology, a British medical journal.

In Suburb, Battle Goes Public on Bullying of Gay Students
A sprawling suburban school system north of Minneapolis is caught in the eye of one of the country’s hottest culture wars: how homosexuality should be discussed in the schools.

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