Posts Tagged ‘ c-section ’

Parents Daily News Roundup

Wednesday, March 6th, 2013

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

The Rise of Tablets as Textbooks
Well before the cleanup from Superstorm Sandy was in full swing, students could read about the weather system that slammed the East Coast in their textbooks. Welcome to the new digital bookcase, where traditional ink-and-paper textbooks have given way to iPads and book bags are getting lighter. (via Huffington Post)

CPS Sex Education: Nation’s Third Largest District Extending Lessons to Kindergarteners (VIDEO)
Is five years old too young to begin receiving sex education lessons? Last week, Chicago Public Schools’ Board of Education approved expanding expanding sexual education in their schools as a means of addressing the high rates of gonorrhea and Chlamydia cases among the city’s teens, as well as a teen HIV rate that has risen 43 percent since 2000, DNAinfo Chicago reports. (via Huffington Post)

New Video Game Detects Vision Problems in Children
Technology is changing the way we view the world, and the American education system is no exception. With as many as one in four children living with undiagnosed vision disorders that may be affecting their performance in school, it’s more important than ever for kids to get screened early. (via Fox News)

New Allergy Guidelines Advises Giving Babies Peanuts Earlier
An article in Tuesday’s Wall Street Journal highlights a new approach to combating food allergies: Introducing allergenic foods like peanut butter and eggs to babies as young as 4 to 6 months old, according to a study in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice. (via Fox News)

Parents to Congress: Police No Solution to Mental Illness
Liza Long’s son first went into the juvenile justice system at 11. He’s mentally ill, but the woman who wrote the viral Internet essay “I am Adam Lanza’s mother” told Congress the police are often the only authorities who can help deal with violent, mentally ill children. (via NBC News)

Rate of Caesarean Deliveries Varies Widely Across U.S.
The rate of Caesarean deliveries, the most common operating-room procedure performed in the United States, varies drastically among hospitals across the country, a new study has found, ranging from 7 percent of all births at the hospital with the lowest share of Caesarean deliveries to 70 percent at the hospital with the highest rate. (via New York Times)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, December 13th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Falling TVs Can Kill, But Few Parents Aware of Risk
Falling TV sets have killed more than 200 children since 2000, but parents remain largely unaware of the danger, according to new reports. (via USA Today)

C-Section Babies More Likely to Become Overweight
Children born via cesarean section are slightly more likely than babies delivered vaginally to become heavy or obese, according to a new review of studies. (via Reuters)

Delaying Childbirth May Reduce Risk of One Form of Breast Cancer
Younger women who wait at least 15 years after their first menstrual period to give birth to their first child may reduce their risk of an aggressive form of breast cancer by up to 60 percent, according to a new study. (via ScienceDaily)

Peanut Butter, Garlic Bread Back on School Plates
The Obama administration recently reversed some of the new school healthy lunch rules, and the kids are happy again. (via CNN)

Stroller Recalled Because of Collapsing Hazard
Baby Jogger City Versa strollers are being recalled because the frame can fail to lock in place and collapse while in use, posing a fall hazard to children in the stroller. (via Huffington Post)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Friday, November 16th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Therapy Can Help Scared Moms Avoid C-Sections
Group therapy can help women avoid risky and costly cesarean sections, especially first-time mothers fearful of childbirth, according to a new study. (via NBC News)

Clues to Cause of Kids’ Brain Tumors
New research on a genetic condition that causes brain cancer is helping scientists better understand the most common type of brain tumor in children. (via ScienceDaily)

Bacteria on Binkies: A Recipe for Crankiness
The latest research suggests that instead of curing crankiness, pacifiers may actually cause babies to be more unruly. (via Time)

School Districts Brace for Cuts as Fiscal Crisis Looms
If the government is unable to resolve the looming debt crisis, federal education programs for elementary and high schools will lose a little over $2 billion starting next fall. (via New York Times)

Four Family Cultures of America Indentified
Four types of family cultures—the Faithful, the Engaged Progressives, the Detached and the American Dreamers—are molding the next generation of Americans, a new study finds. (via ScienceDaily)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Monday, November 12th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Study Tentatively Links Flu in Pregnancy and Autism
Kids whose mothers had the flu while pregnant were slightly more likely to be diagnosed with “infantile autism” before age three in a new study. But the children’s overall risk for the developmental disorder was not higher than that of other kids. (via Reuters)

Next-Day Discharge After C-Section May Be Okay: Study
Some women who deliver their babies by cesarean section may be able to check out of the hospital the next day without raising their risk of problems, according to a new study. (via Reuters)

Children’s Headaches Rarely Linked to Vision Problems
If your child gets recurring headaches and you think they might need glasses, you may be mistaken – a new study says children’s headaches are rarely triggered by vision problems. (via CNN)

Early Stress May Sensitize Girls’ Brains for Later Anxiety
High levels of family stress in infancy are linked to differences in everyday brain function and anxiety in teenage girls, according to new results of a long-running population study. (via ScienceDaily)

Cell Phone Use In Schools A Possibility With ‘Bring Your Own Technology’ Initiative
As schools try to add more technology during a time when they are receiving less funding, many will begin to consider allowing students to use devices they already own. That will include cellphones and electronic tablets like iPads. (via Huffington Post)

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Friday, May 25th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

More Kids Eating Detergent Packs, Docs Report
Miniature laundry detergent packets arrived on store shelves in recent months as an alternative to bulky bottles and messy spills. But doctors across the country say children are confusing the tiny, brightly colored packets with candy and swallowing them.

Childhood Cancer Effects May Linger in Adults
Survivors of childhood cancers have an increased risk of disfigurement and persistent hair loss later in life, and for some that may lead to long-term emotional distress, suggests a new study.

Study Links Obesity to C-Section Births
Elizabeth Cohen discusses a study linking babies born via C-section to obesity.

Supreme Court Rules Against Benefits for Posthumously Conceived Kids
Karen Capato used her deceased husband’s frozen sperm to conceive twins. The Supreme Court has ruled the kids aren’t eligible for federal benefits because of their posthumous conception.

9-Ounce Newborn May Leave the Hospital
Kenna Moore was born at a wee nine ounces, perhaps one of the smallest babies in the world to survive.

School Plans Condom Giveaway for Prom
Bedford-Stuyvesant Preparatory High School in Brooklyn, N.Y. will make 500 condoms available at the school’s June 7 prom.

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Wednesday, March 14th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

Repeat C-section May Be Safer Option for Moms, Babies
For women who delivered their first baby by cesarean section, delivering a second baby also by C-section may be somewhat safer for both mother and baby than a vaginal birth, a new study reveals.

US Mortality Rates Dropped, Biggest Decline in Young Children
The risk of dying at any given age has dropped sharply over the last 75 years in the United States, with the most dramatic improvement seen among young children, according to a new government analysis of mortality rates.

Early Childhood Neglect Has Negative Impact on Kids
New research shows that children who spend the first two years of their life watching more television than engaging with books, toys and people are more likely to have long-term effects including delayed language skills and a brain that’s not wired for learning and development.

Can Playing Maternal Voice and Heartbeat Sounds Benefit Premies?
A new study suggests that premies may miss mom’s sounds by being born early.

Fatty Foods Linked to Poor Sperm Quality
A new study, published online in the European journal Human Reproduction, found that men who ate diets higher in saturated fat had lower sperm counts and concentration than men who consumed less fat. But men who consumed more omega-3 fatty acids — healthy fats found in fish and plant oils — had better formed sperm.

Kids Can’t See Anti-Bullying Film Due to R Rating
Kids, the very audience who would benefit most from seeing the new documentary “Bully,” aren’t allowed to see it without a parent or guardian. The film earned an R rating from the Motion Picture Association of America due to adult language.

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Thursday, February 9th, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

10 States Given Waivers From No Child Left Behind Law
President Obama will waive central provisions of the No Child Left Behind federal education law for 10 states that have embraced his educational agenda and promised to raise standards, and improve accountability and teacher effectiveness, the White House announced on Thursday morning.

FDA Approves a 10-Minute, No-Comb Treatment for Head Lice
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved on Tuesday a prescription-strength lotion for the treatment of head lice in children 6 months and older.

C-Sections Can Increase Premature Babies’ Risk of Breathing Problems
Contrary to popular belief, cesarean section appears not to be the best way to deliver preterm babies who are small for their age, according to research presented Thursday at the annual meeting of the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine.

Youths Are Watching, but Less Often on TV
Americans ages 12 to 34 are spending less time in front of TV sets, even as those 35 and older are spending more, according to research that will be released on Thursday by Nielsen, a company that tracks media use.

Pageant Mom’s ‘Go-Go’ Juice Comes Under Fire
One mother routinely gives her daughter caffeine before each pageant competition.

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Parents Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, January 31st, 2012

Goody Blog Daily News Roundup

AIDS Prevention Inspires Ways to Make Circumcisions Easier
Donors are pinning their hopes on several devices being tested in efforts to increase speed and reduce pain.

Don’t Blame C-sections for Fat Children, Study Says
Past research from Brazil had found a link between excessive weight and C-sections, leading some scientists to suggest that not being exposed to bacteria from the birth canal could make children fatter, but the latest findings — published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition — suggest this doesn’t appear to be the case.

More Newborns Suffering Drug Withdrawal at Birth
A dramatic rise in newborns experiencing drug withdrawal after being exposed in the womb poses challenges for clinicians on how to detox these tiny victims, a new report indicates.

‘Sonicated’ Sperm: Could Ultrasound Be the Next Male Contraceptive?
Condoms aren’t foolproof, and vasectomies may be too much so. Now researchers say they’re working on another contraceptive option for men that offers them more flexibility and control over their fertility. It’s based on ultrasound.

Pneumonia Bug Evolves to Evade Vaccine, Study Says
Bugs that cause childhood pneumonia and meningitis have evolved to evade vaccines by swapping bits of their genome with other bacteria, according to a study published Sunday.

Teen Wishing to Donate to Locks of Love Is Suspended for Violating School’s Hair Policy for Boys
Michigan high school student J.T. Gaskins, a leukemia survivor, was recently singled out for perfect behavior. Now he’s suspended, caught up in a face-off with his school, Madison Academy, near Flint, Mich., for violating the dress code for boys as he grows out his locks for a cancer charity.

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