Posts Tagged ‘ Breast Feeding ’

Daily News Roundup

Tuesday, December 28th, 2010

Goody Blog Daily News RoundupVitamin D Helps Kids’ Breathing, Study Says: Are Supplements Smart?
Strong bones aren’t the only benefit of vitamin D. A new study suggests that the “sunshine vitamin” helps prevent breathing problems in infants and young children.”Our data suggest that the association between vitamin D and wheezing, which can be a symptom of many respiratory diseases and not just asthma, is largely due to respiratory infections,” study leader Dr. Carlos Camargo, associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, said in a written statement. [CBS News]

Madonna Plays Santa for Malawi Children
Madonna wasn’t able to visit Malawi this Christmas, but she let the children in the six orphanages she funds there know they were very much on her mind this holiday season.  Boxes of toys, chocolate, other sweets and clothes were shipped with a handwritten note from the star, which read, “To my Malawi children on Christmas and Boxing Day. I wish I was with you. See you soon M.” Inside the goodie boxes were miniature Christmas cards signed by Madonna, Lourdes and Rocco. [CNN]

Teacher Effort Is Linked To Difficult Students’ Inherited Traits
Challenging students take up more of their teachers’ time – and the difference between a tougher student and an easier one appears to be genetic, according to a new study published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. The study looked at young twins in the U.K. and asked their teachers how much of a handful they are. [Medical News Today]

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White House Supports Working Mothers Who Breastfeed

Tuesday, December 21st, 2010

Mothers who want to breastfeed their children at work find that office spaces are rarely conducive to privacy and support.  To make it easier for mothers to transition back to the workplace while maintaining a bond with their babies, the White House Council on Women and Girls announced yesterday that new efforts will be made to support the Affordable Care Act. 

Signed by President Obama on March 23, 2010, the Affordable Care Act requires that employers  provide a private place (other than a bathroom) and a reasonable break time for new moms who need to express milk and nurse their babies for up to one year.

Under the new amendment, the Wage and Hour Division at the Department of Labor will be improving on three things to enforce the ACA:

1- Releasing a Frequently Asked Questions document and a Request for Information.  The former will provide guidelines on how companies can comply with the law while the latter will allow for public comment on the law. 

2- Delegating responsibility to the Director of the Office of Personnel Management to make sure federal agencies are enforcing the Affordable Care Act in companies.

3- Providing a new online breastfeeding resource that will help nursing mothers understand the new amendments to the Affordable Care Act. Visit www.dol.gov/whd/nursingmothers/

The White House would like to encourage companies to support breastfeeding moms because the benefits of breastfeeding include increased workplace productivity, increased company brand reputation and recruitment, increased health benefits for mom and baby (reduced risk of infection, breast cancer, obesity, diabetes, etc.), decreased absenteeism and employee turnover, and increased cost savings on company healthcare.

Read more information about the Affordable Care Act:

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Study: No Extra Sleep for Formula vs. Breast-Feeding Moms

Wednesday, November 10th, 2010

Moms-to-be thinking of going the formula route in hopes of gaining some extra zzz’s each night may want to think again.

According to a new study published in the journal Pediatrics, a mother who breast feeds and one who formula feeds will get about the same amount of sleep each night. “The perception is that the breast-feeding mom is up day and night, always breast-feeding,” Miriam Labbok, director of the Carolina Global Breastfeeding Institute at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, was quoted as saying in Pediatrics. “But when you’re bottle-feeding, you’re up day and night always bottle-feeding, too,” she continues.

Hawley Montgomery-Downs, an assistant professor of psychology and coordinator of the behavioral neuroscience program at West Virginia University in Morgantown and the study’s lead author explained in the article that while “there is some small evidence that infants who are breast-fed sleep less, no one has ever looked at the mother’s sleep until now.”  However, after conducting the study, which tracked new moms’ sleep habits using a watch-like monitoring device over a period of 2 weeks after baby’s birth to 12 weeks, ”we found absolutely no difference in the mother’s sleep based on how babies were fed,” said Montgomery-Downs.

These new findings come as music to breast-feeding advocates’ ears–they’re, of course, hoping undecided moms-to-be will now be swayed toward the idea that breast is best, and in doing so, allow their babies to reap the many health benefits natural feeding is shown to provide. Regardless, the good news is that when it comes to sleep for mom, breast and formula are on equal footing.

Does this new study change your mind on breast feeding vs formula feeding? Share your thoughts with us!

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Daily News Roundup

Monday, November 8th, 2010

Goody Blog Daily News RoundupMany breast-fed babies lack Vitamin D - Although breast milk may be the best source of nutrition for babies it is low in Vitamin D. Newborn babies need 400 international units of Vitamin D a day, and can not get that from breast milk alone. Mothers who have breastfed should also give their child a Vitamin D droplet.  This is a simple solution however, only five to thirteen percent of breastfed babies receive these supplements according to the American Academy of Pediatrics.  [MSNBC]
 
Cute naked photos of tots pose dilemma for parents - It seems that the days when parents could take photos of their baby taking a bath are now over.  They have the potential of getting arrested themselves for the exploitation of a minor if they post the nude shots online or in public. [MSNBC]
 
Kids get an eyeful of fast food marketing – According to researchers from Yale University’s Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity there has been a substantial increase in fast food adds bombarding child audiences, and it seems to be working. Forty percent of children ages 2 to 11 ask their parents to take them to McDonald’s at least once a week, and 15 percent of preschoolers ask to go every single day. [Washington Post]
 
Mental health visits rise as parent deploys – As multiple deployments become a norm there is a need to investigate their effects on military families as a whole.  A new study, published in the Journal of Pediatrics including more than half a million children, released information suggesting that it is harder on their psyche than anticipated. Visits for mental health concerns, like anxiety and acting out at school, were the only kind to increase during deployment; complaints for all physical problems declined, the study found. [The New York Times]
 
In efforts to end bullying, some see agenda – Angry parents and religious critics agree that schoolyard harassment should be stopped, but are charging liberals and gay rights groups as using the anti-bullying banner to pursue a hidden “homosexual agenda.” [The New York Times]

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Daily News Roundup

Thursday, October 28th, 2010

GoodBlog imageEven the sickest babies benefit from breast-feeding: Pediatric researchers at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia describe a successful program in which nurses helped mothers attain high rates of breast-feeding in very sick babies–newborns with complex birth defects requiring surgery and intensive care. [Medical News Today]

Breakthrough in understanding life-threatening childhood liver disease: Until now, doctors weren’t sure what caused biliary atresia, which is important to know in order to develop better treatments. The CU researchers propose that an infection late in the third trimester of pregnancy or soon after birth initiates the bile duct injury. [Medical News Today]

Cardiac wakeup call for kids: “Sleep disorders in kids are on the increase. They are marching hand in hand with other increasing cardiovascular risk factors such as overweight and obesity, lack of physical activity, a poor diet, and high levels of unhealthy cholesterol,” Dr. McCrindle today told the Canadian Cardiovascular Congress 2010, co-hosted by the Heart and Stroke Foundation and the Canadian Cardiovascular Society.[Medical News Today]

Candidates use children to make final pitch: Candidates who have spent months and millions of dollars slugging it out are replacing attacks ads with gauzy images designed to leave voters with a warm and fuzzy feeling. And what better way to do that than with children? [Washington Post]

Breast milk study furthers understanding of critical ingredients: Ask someone in the know to list the substances in breast milk that make it the ideal food for newborns and you may hear about proteins that guard against infection, fats that aid in the development of the nervous system and carbohydrates that promote the growth of healthy bacteria. But, you may not hear too much about the nitrite and nitrate in breast milk and their contributions to developing gastrointestinal, immune and cardiovascular systems. [Science Daily]

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Flex Spending Rules: Breast Pumps Out, Acne Cream In

Wednesday, October 27th, 2010

Thanks to health care reform, individuals can now take care of personal health needs with IRS-sheltered flex accounts. Unless they’re breast-feeding moms.

The IRS states breastfeeding doesn’t have “enough health benefits to qualify as a form of medical care,” according to The New York Times–which means you won’t be able to use your new tax-free flexible spending account for breast pumps.

Basically, it comes down to whether breastfeeding is considered preventative care, or just nutrition. The flexible spending accounts are tax-free and, according to the Times, could apply to denture tape, acne cream, and the replacement of grass with astroturf for parents of children with allergies.

Advocates for seeing breastfeeding as preventative care point out that the antibodies in breast milk prevent disease, “including one recent study that found it could prevent the premature death of 900 babies a year.”

Breast pumps, which could cost $500-$1000, are a loaded topic because they are instrumental in enabling new moms to juggle care for their babies and go back to work.

What do you think about breast pumps not being covered under health care?

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